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Future Phone Displays Could Take Your Temperature, Analyze DNA - Mashable

Future Phone Displays Could Take Your Temperature, Analyze DNA - Mashable | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Future Phone Displays Could Take Your Temperature, Analyze DNA Mashable Your future smartphone display might detect if you have a cold and could even analyze your DNA.
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Our second issue of Genome explores how technology can (and can't) change our health. This article from Mashable says phones will soon be able to analyze your DNA.
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Personal Cancer Cures? All About Cancer Genomics in 9 Tweets - ABC News (blog)

Personal Cancer Cures? All About Cancer Genomics in 9 Tweets - ABC News (blog) | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
ABC News (blog) Personal Cancer Cures? All About Cancer Genomics in 9 Tweets ABC News (blog) This sounds like a far-fetched concept but it is closer to becoming reality thanks to the growing field of cancer genomics.
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Gulf Oil Spill "Not Over": Dolphins, Turtles Dying in Record Numbers

Gulf Oil Spill "Not Over": Dolphins, Turtles Dying in Record Numbers | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Four years after the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, the Gulf of Mexico's wildlife species are still struggling to recover, according to a new report released today.
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Missing WWII soldier may be found with help of college's DNA lab - Fox News

Missing WWII soldier may be found with help of college's DNA lab - Fox News | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Fox11online.com Missing WWII soldier may be found with help of college's DNA lab Fox News MADISON, Wis. – The University of Wisconsin's DNA lab may help bring the final member of a World War II unit home.
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New models of drug-resistant breast cancer point to better treatments - Washington University in St. Louis News

New models of drug-resistant breast cancer point to better treatments - Washington University in St. Louis News | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
New models of drug-resistant breast cancer point to better treatments Washington University in St.
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Discovery of oldest-yet human DNA muddies family tree - Alexandria Town Talk

Discovery of oldest-yet human DNA muddies family tree - Alexandria Town Talk | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Discovery of oldest-yet human DNA muddies family tree Alexandria Town Talk In a scientific tour de force, researchers analyzing a scrap of bone from an ancient human have extracted DNA at least 300,000 years old, more than double the age of the...
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700,000-Year-Old Przewalski’s Horse Found in Yukon Permafrost Yields Oldest DNA Ever Decoded

700,000-Year-Old Przewalski’s Horse Found in Yukon Permafrost Yields Oldest DNA Ever Decoded | personalized medicine | Scoop.it

The frozen remains of a horse more than half a million years old have reluctantly given up their genetic secrets, providing scientists with the oldest DNA ever sequenced.

 

The horse was discovered in 2003 in the ancient permafrost of Canada’s west-central Yukon Territory, not far from the Alaskan border.

 

The Przewalski’s Horse, which lives on the steppes of central Asia, likely deviated from the lineage leading to modern domesticated horses some 50,000 years ago. (Photo: Joe Ravi)

And although the animal was dated to between 560,000 and 780,000 years old, an international team of researchers was able to use a new combination of techniques to decipher its genetic code.

 

Among the team’s findings is that the genus Equus — which includes all horses, donkeys, and zebras — dates back more than 4 million years, twice as long ago as scientists had previously believed.

 

“When we started the project, everyone — including us, to be honest — thought it was impossible,” said Dr. Ludovic Orlando of the University of Copenhagen, who coordinated the research, in a statement to Western Digs.

 

“And it was to some extent, with the methods available by then. So it’s clearly methodological advances that made this possible.”

 

Orlando and his colleagues published their findings this summer in the journal Nature; he discussed them today in a lecture at The Royal Society, London.

 

Previous to this, the oldest genome ever sequenced was of a 120,000-year-old polar bear — no small feat consider that the half-life of a DNA molecule is estimated to be about 521 years. By this reckoning, even under the best conditions, DNA could remain intact for no more than 6.8 million years.

 

But Orlando’s team was able to make the most of what they had for a number of reasons, he said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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All the Things That Mutate Our DNA | RealClearScience

All the Things That Mutate Our DNA | RealClearScience | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
June 14, 2014. All the Things That Mutate Our DNA. Megan Scudellari, The Scientist. The Associated Press. On an otherwise ordinary day in 1964, Bruce Ames picked up a box of potato chips and read the list of ingredients.
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Epigenetics: the ever-changing genetic landscape within us - Health & Wellbeing

Epigenetics: the ever-changing genetic landscape within us - Health & Wellbeing | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
When it comes to your health, the genes you inherit from your parents and grandparents play a significant role. But it's not just about their genes; you can also be affected by the environmental factors they encountered.
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Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants

Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Genetic imprint from traumatic experiences carries through at least two generations.
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Should Oklahoma collect DNA from arrestees? - Grandlakenews

Should Oklahoma collect DNA from arrestees? - Grandlakenews | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Should Oklahoma collect DNA from arrestees? Grandlakenews For Maggie Zingman, the scenario is clear, although still just a hope. A man is arrested on criminal charges in Oklahoma and booked into jail.
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Chromosome 13 - BRCA2 and DNA Damage

Mistakes in the "recipe" of your DNA -- if bits of code go missing, or get swapped or damaged -- could spell the difference between life and death. DNA often gets damaged by everyday processes within our bodies, but also from external factors such as UV radiation or tobacco smoke. Luckily, our bodies are well equipped to fix this damage thanks, in part, to the BRCA2 gene, found on chromosome 11.
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The FDA Wants 23andMe To Stop Selling Its Genetic Testing Kits

The FDA Wants 23andMe To Stop Selling Its Genetic Testing Kits | personalized medicine | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration is ordering 23andMe to stop selling its saliva collection kits for its personal genome service.

 

23andMe is a health and ancestry DNA startup, founded by Anne Wojcicki in 2006. For $99, you receive a spit kit, provide 23andMe with a saliva sample, and send in your results.

Within a few weeks, you receive a bunch of information about what your DNA says about you.

But now the FDA is accusing 23andMe of violating the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, it recently stated in a warning letter addressed to 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki. In the letter, the FDA claims that 23andMe marketed its saliva collection kit and personal genome service without clearance or approval.


Via Alex Butler
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Cambridge company embarks on genome engineering - Boston Globe

Cambridge company embarks on genome engineering - Boston Globe | personalized medicine | Scoop.it
Cambridge company embarks on genome engineering
Boston Globe
“You can basically cut and paste to alter the DNA sequence.” The chief benefit of the CRISPR approach to genome engineering is its extreme precision and versatility.
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It's a brave new world we're living in!  Exciting stuff!

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