Personality in Life and Learning
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Personality in Life and Learning
Psychological issues on personality, his/her existense problems and developments, coping with problems in life and learning
Curated by Iryna Sekret
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Creativity in the English language classroom

This is the presentation from my 16th July webinar for the British Council. The webinar was based around concepts and ideas from the book I co-edited with Alan…

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Sue Valdeck's curator insight, July 18, 2015 1:21 AM

View the C Group blog to get more information about the aims of the group and some great lesson ideas for your EFL / ESL classroom. You'll find the address for the blog plus a free eBook when you click through the slides in this presentation.

 

Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:15 PM

Perfect.

Thank you for sharing.

Ayotomi Fasuyi's curator insight, March 11, 7:47 AM

Webinar about the book I co-edited.

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What is Person-Centered Therapy? Carl Rogers

What is Person-Centered Therapy? Carl Rogers | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
The Person-Centered Therapy was developed from the concepts of humanistic psychology. This approach views people as capable and able to solve their difficulties, realize potential and change their lives for the better.

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Theories Related to Connectivism - by Stephen Downes

Theories Related to Connectivism - by Stephen Downes | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

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Arne Krokan's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:10 PM

Hvilke temaer henger sammen med connectivismen? Les hva en av "oppfinnerne" skriver om dette emnet.

 

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11 Rules for Critical Thinking

11 Rules for Critical Thinking | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

A fantastic list of 11 rules from some of history’s greatest minds. These are Prospero’s Precepts and they are found in AKA Shakespeare: A Scientific Approach to the Authorship Question:


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The competencies required for effective performance in a university e-learning environment - Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

The competencies required for effective performance in a university e-learning environment - Australasian Journal of Educational Technology | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
The competencies required for effective performance in a university e-learning environment

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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, January 7, 2014 1:42 PM

Worth a read --

 

Abstract:

 

The aim of this study was to identify and rate the importance of the competencies required by students for effective performance in a university e-learning environment mediated by a learning management system. Two expert panels identified 58 e-learning competencies considered to be essential for e-learning. Of these competencies, 22 were related to the use of technology. The remaining 36 competencies encapsulated a range of practices considered to be essential for learning within a social constructivist framework. Six of the competencies identified were either new or substantially different from what had been previously identified in the literature. A survey of e-learning stakeholders rating the importance of the e-learning competencies indicated that the competencies were not of equal importance. Critically, a number of key competencies from a social constructivist perspective that dealt with interacting and working with others were rated as being unimportant. This suggests that there is a disconnect between what the literature says about the importance of social constructivism to e-learning environments in theory and what e-learningstakeholders perceive its importance to be in practice.

siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, January 8, 2014 7:52 AM

Abstract:

 

The aim of this study was to identify and rate the importance of the competencies required by students for effective performance in a university e-learning environment mediated by a learning management system. Two expert panels identified 58 e-learning competencies considered to be essential for e-learning. Of these competencies, 22 were related to the use of technology. The remaining 36 competencies encapsulated a range of practices considered to be essential for learning within a social constructivist framework. Six of the competencies identified were either new or substantially different from what had been previously identified in the literature. A survey of e-learning stakeholders rating the importance of the e-learning competencies indicated that the competencies were not of equal importance. Critically, a number of key competencies from a social constructivist perspective that dealt with interacting and working with others were rated as being unimportant. This suggests that there is a disconnect between what the literature says about the importance of social constructivism to e-learning environments in theory and what e-learning stakeholders perceive its importance to be in practice.

Jaime Salcedo Luna's curator insight, January 12, 2014 5:30 PM

Competencias requeridas de los estudiantes para se efectivos en un curso online.

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David Thornburg: Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today

David Thornburg: Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
A conversation with David Thornburg about designing a better classroom


“Of all the places I remember from my childhood,” David Thornburg writes, “school was the most depressing.”  The now award-winning educational futurist and creator of the “educational holodeck,” Thornburg’s early experience in the classroom prompted him to help others rethink traditional classroom design. In his latest book, From the Campfire to the Holodeck: Creating Engaging and Powerful 21st Century Learning Environments, Thornburg outlines four learning models: the traditional “campfire,” or lecture-based design; the “watering hole,” or social learning; the “cave,” a place to quietly reflect; and “life”—where ideas are tested.


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Aldo de A. Barreto's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:25 AM

Of all the places I remember from my childhood,” David Thornburg writes, “school was the most depressing.”  

Meryl van der Merwe's curator insight, November 18, 2013 3:27 PM

Great points here - I think I want to read his books

Annette Schmeling's comment, November 20, 2013 10:59 AM
Engagement is the key. When the teacher, or professor, themselves have fully engaged with the material and used multiple senses in mastering the content they are more apt to spark the passion and interest for others. Even their lectures will be more engaging.
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Cultural dimensions of learning: Addressing the challenges of multicultural instruction

Cultural dimensions of learning: Addressing the challenges of multicultural instruction | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
Cultural dimensions of learning: Addressing the challenges of multicultural instruction

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Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases

Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is an increasingly important skill that has been overlooked by many as information becomes more accessible and superfluous.
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The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer

The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

"The difference between assessment of learning and assessment for learning is a crucial one, in many ways indicative of an important shift in education.

Traditionally, tests have told teachers and parents how a student “does,” then offers a very accessible point of data (usually percentage correct and subsequent letter grade) that is reported to parents as a performance indicator."


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Mary Starry's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:04 PM

"Assessment for learning" versus "assessment of learning" is also promoted as a key component of the learning portfolio all colleges of pharmacy need to have to demonstrate student achievement.

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:40 PM

I have practiced a system that covers four of the 5 key strategies for many years starting at five years of age.  I would not teach any other way. With this kind of assessment students after seven years of age can lead parent teacher conferences with ease and confidence. Had a dad in tears once who confessed it was the first time his son had talked meaningfully to him about his learning. Then I was in tears too....

Aunty Alice's curator insight, November 21, 2013 8:03 PM

A good little diagram but it does not address the issue of how to do it..it requires modelling, first by the teacher, then slowly devolving the responsibility to the learner, and focus on one subject area at a time e.g. Literacy . In my experience it also requires set aside time with each student to assess together, recording what has been discussed so it is not forgotten. I am talking about elementary learners here.. 

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A Brief History of IQ Testing

A Brief History of IQ Testing | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
Intelligence has been an important and controversial topic throughout psychology's history. In addition to debates over how to define intelligence, researchers.

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History of Intelligence Testing

History of Intelligence Testing | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
Interest in intelligence dates back thousands of years, but it wasn't until psychologist Alfred Binet was commissioned over 100 years ago to identify students who needed educational assistance that the first IQ test was born.

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Rachel Roberts-Jones's comment, February 15, 2013 4:07 PM
With cognitive abilities being so diverse is intelligence testing just too simplistic a tool for measurement? If intelligence can not be defined how can it be tested?
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Epistemologies for qualitative research

Qualitative Psychology Nexus: Vol. 8Hannu Soini, Eeva-Liisa Kronqvist & Günter L. Huber (Eds.)Epistemologies forQualitative Research
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Rebooting "Learning Styles" | Knewton Blog

Rebooting "Learning Styles" | Knewton Blog | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

A learning strategy is a student’s learning path, whether deliberate or not, through particular content, and the resulting learning outcomes. And Knewton can measure the effects of these strategies, to the percentile, for every student, at the concept level.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 26, 2014 5:39 PM

Interesting and controversial article.

Lou Salza's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:44 AM

This reframing makes sense to me. It does an 'end run' around the arguments about learning styles--and goes right to the heart of what works for learners.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

A learning strategy is a student’s learning path, whether deliberate or not, through particular content, and the resulting learning outcomes. And Knewton can measure the effects of these strategies, to the percentile, for every student, at the concept level.

There are myriad learning strategies that Knewton measures and adjusts for. A sample of the ones we’re focused on now: the amount of content covered per session, the format of the learning experience (text vs. video vs. game vs. physical simulation vs. group discussion, etc.), the difficulty level of prose explaining a given concept, the difficulty of accompanying practice questions, the time of day, whether content contains mnemonic devices, whether it confuses cause and effect, whether it makes use of lists, student attention span, student engagement with particular learning content, strategic modalities (e.g., does the content define a procedure vs. address a common misconception vs. use a concrete example?), the presence or absence of learning aids (e.g., hints), user-specific features (e.g., difficulty relative to the student’s current proficiency), and many, many more.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:37 PM

It is more likely we possess a mixture of learning styles, learning strategies, and intelligences. Schools have become places where we attempt to push students into conforming and moving towards a mythical ideal which means those who do not conform stand out and there must be something wrong in their learning. It is more likely humans are on a continuum and learning is different for each of us. Yes, there are some who are at extreme ends of the continuum and learning is a challenge which has to be met. What would happen if the vast majority were given more freedom in their learning and teachers given freedom in working relationally with students?

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The Roberto Marzano’s 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic

The Roberto Marzano’s 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
The Robert Marzano's 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic summarizes the 9 instructional strategies to improve students' learning.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 2014 3:50 PM

For those that are lifelong learners  and in the learning mode as opposed to the knowing mode.  Let me count the ways to get a message across no matter what the age of the student is.

Rocio Watkins's curator insight, February 22, 2014 10:34 PM

Marzano's famous "Nine" continue to be the topic of many professional development agendas, and continue to deliver research-based and improved student outcomes.  A "must-know" for the teaching vocation.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, February 23, 2014 6:15 PM

This is a keeper!

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Connectivism (Slidecast)


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2020 Vision: Outlook for online learning in 2014 and way beyond

2020 Vision: Outlook for online learning in 2014 and way beyond | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:04 PM

Excellent article. Very thorough. This will help with looking at open classrooms. 

niftyjock's curator insight, January 22, 2014 4:23 PM

Very interesting 2020 vison, but can we please stop using 2020

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 9, 2014 7:26 PM

It sounds like digital technologies are the only way people will be educated. Blending what has been done with new tools is essential moving forward.

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Adult Learners - Learning Styles

Adult Learners - Learning Styles | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:19 AM

"Knowles' Andragogical Model is based on four basic assumptions of adults as learners that distinguish them from children.

 

 

1 Self concept
2. Experience
3. Readiness to learn
4. Orientation to learning."

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:30 PM

Great one.

ghbrett's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:10 AM

This is an interactive posting. Each button for a Law presents content in the box to the right. Interesting.

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Portfolio Community of Practice: Assessing ePortfolios.

Portfolio Community of Practice: Assessing ePortfolios. | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:34 AM

Here are some good how-to instructions to work from.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, November 18, 2013 3:33 PM

As many of you know, I collaborate regularly with Tina Schneider and Barbara Tallentt, founders of LiveBinders.  I am a strong believer in the development of ePortfolois.  This flow chart is a good start to developing a solid assessment rubric regarding ePortfolios. 

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, November 24, 2013 2:33 PM

get the pdf version of the document: http://blogs.ubc.ca/portfolios/files/2013/11/Assessing-ePortfolios.pdf ;

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AugCog: The Center for Augmented Cognition

Augmented cognition is about making tools for thinking. It is not about designing tools that humans can use, but about extending humanity's abilities through software, hardware or conceptual tools. We focus mainly on software here, curating a collection of links and resources. Email Sam Gerstenzang with any suggestions.


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IT's curator insight, November 5, 2013 6:00 AM

Tools for thinking. Amazing.

Katterley's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:50 AM

Exciting! Get involved and get busy!

Helen Teague's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:28 PM

Howard Rheingold's insight:

"A promising new site. They name Vannevar Bush, J.C.R. Licklider, and Douglas Engelbart as 'the canon,'"

their blog continues to  develop

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Dialogue and Connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning

Dialogue and Connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it
Dialogue and connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:30 AM

Connectivism offers a theory of learning for the digital age that is usually understood as contrasting with traditional behaviourist, cognitivist, and constructivist approaches. This article will provide an original and significant development of this theory through arguing and demonstrating how it can benefit from social constructivist perspectives and a focus on dialogue. Similarly, I argue that we need to ask whether networked social media is, essentially, a new landscape for dialogue and therefore should be conceived and investigated based on this premise, through considering dialogue as the primary means to develop and exploit connections for learning. A key lever in this argument is the increasingly important requirement for greater criticality on the Internet in relation to our assessment and development of connections with people and resources. The open, participative, and social web actually requires a greater emphasis on higher order cognitive and social competencies that are realised predominantly through dialogue and discourse. Or, as Siemens (2004) implies, in his call to rethink the fundamental precepts of learning, we need to shift our focus to promoting core evaluative skills for flexible learning that will, for example, allow us to actuate the knowledge we need at the point that we need it. A corollary of this is the need to reorient educational experiences to ensure that we develop in our learners the ability “to think, reason, and analyse.” In considering how we can achieve these aims this article will review the principles of connectivism from a dialogue perspective; propose some social constructivist approaches, based on dialectic and dialogic dimensions of dialogue, which can act as levers in realising connectivist learning dialogue; demonstrate how dialogue games can link the discussed theories to the design and performance of networked dialogue processes; and consider the broader implications of this work for designing and delivering sociotechnical learning.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, October 28, 2013 1:27 PM
Ana Cristina Pratas's insight:

Connectivism offers a theory of learning for the digital age that is usually understood as contrasting with traditional behaviourist, cognitivist, and constructivist approaches. This article will provide an original and significant development of this theory through arguing and demonstrating how it can benefit from social constructivist perspectives and a focus on dialogue. Similarly, I argue that we need to ask whether networked social media is, essentially, a new landscape for dialogue and therefore should be conceived and investigated based on this premise, through considering dialogue as the primary means to develop and exploit connections for learning. A key lever in this argument is the increasingly important requirement for greater criticality on the Internet in relation to our assessment and development of connections with people and resources. The open, participative, and social web actually requires a greater emphasis on higher order cognitive and social competencies that are realised predominantly through dialogue and discourse. Or, as Siemens (2004) implies, in his call to rethink the fundamental precepts of learning, we need to shift our focus to promoting core evaluative skills for flexible learning that will, for example, allow us to actuate the knowledge we need at the point that we need it. A corollary of this is the need to reorient educational experiences to ensure that we develop in our learners the ability “to think, reason, and analyse.” In considering how we can achieve these aims this article will review the principles of connectivism from a dialogue perspective; propose some social constructivist approaches, based on dialectic and dialogic dimensions of dialogue, which can act as levers in realising connectivist learning dialogue; demonstrate how dialogue games can link the discussed theories to the design and performance of networked dialogue processes; and consider the broader implications of this work for designing and delivering sociotechnical learning.

Teacher Rose's curator insight, November 1, 2013 4:59 AM

Los latinos somos conectivistas por naturaleza. 

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UNESCO IITE - Policy Brief: Learning Analytics

UNESCO IITE - Policy Brief: Learning Analytics | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

"Learning Analytics is a rapidly growing research field and commercial , with potentially disruptive potential. While educationalresearchers have for many years used computational techniques toanalyse learner data, generate visualizations of learning dynamics,and build predictive models to test theories — for the first time, these techniques are becoming available to educators, learners and policy makers. Learning analytics promise is to transform educational research into a data-driven science, and educational institutions into organisations that make evidence-based decisions. However, critical debate is needed on the limits of computational modelling, the ethics of analytics, and the educational paradigms that learning analytics promote."

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The Contested Nature of Empirical Educational Research (and Why Philosophy of Education Offers Little Help) - PHILLIPS

The Contested Nature of Empirical Educational Research (and Why Philosophy of Education Offers Little Help) - PHILLIPS | Personality in Life and Learning | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:18 PM

This paper suggests that empirical educational research has not, on the whole, been treated well by philosophers of education. A variety of criticisms have been offered, ranging from triviality, conceptual confusion and the impossibility of empirically studying normative processes. Furthermore, many of those who criticise, or dismiss, empirical research do so without subjecting any specific examples to careful scholarly scrutiny. It is suggested that both philosophy of education, and the empirical research enterprise, stand to profit if philosophers pay more attention to real cases—and this attention is especially important at present, when research funding is being based on spurious scientistic criteria such as the use of ‘gold standard’ randomised experimental research designs.

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Investigating Students' Epistemologies in CSCL Discourse Through Re...

Short paper presentation at the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2011 Hong Kong
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