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The Common Traits Of The Most Successful People

The Common Traits Of The Most Successful People | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Do you have a routine for focus and a feeling of connectedness in your work? These great innovators had these traits in common.
Eric Anderson's insight:

Looking forward to reading Robert Greene's latest book, "Mastery".

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The Physics of Productivity

The Physics of Productivity | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Newton’s three laws of motion can be used as an interesting analogy for increasing your productivity, simplifying your work, and improving your life.
Eric Anderson's insight:
Check out this take on David Allen's 2-minute rule and where we focus our attention. A great way to look at overcoming procrastination. Hyrum Smith presented something similar in the early '90s in the original "TimeQuest" training.
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Culture Eats Strategy – Innovation Psychology Explored

Culture Eats Strategy – Innovation Psychology Explored | Personal Best | Scoop.it

The late, great Peter Drucker said “Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast”.  Of his many insights, this might be the most important for Innovation.  However, just as a fish doesn’t see the water, culture is often invisible to those that operate inside of it, and can therefore be difficult to influence or even evaluate. Unlike strategy, which can be mapped out in a memo, or innovation processes, which can be taught at an offsite, culture needs to be grown and nurtured over time. When it is, it can be both powerful and resilient, even if it isn’t always obvious. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Eric Anderson's insight:

Worth the read!

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 24, 2014 2:11 PM

Excerpt from the article: 


So what is a great Innovation culture, and where can I buy one?  There is no one size fits all, but there are some components that are almost universally important for Innovation.


1.  Autonomy and Purpose: There is a significant body of evidence that suggests for creative tasks, as long as people receive enough compensation to be comfortable, it is intrinsic, rather than extrinsic motivation that drives performance.   That is, autonomy, alignment with purpose, and respect are all more likely than money to have a team ordering pizza at 9pm because they cannot put a problem down.  If you want to dig deeper into this, Dan Ariely has done a lot of work in this area, and Dan Pink has an excellent video/TED talk where he discusses the power of  Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose in driving intrinsic motivation.


2.  Mastery and T-Shaped Innovators: Mastery is critical.  We need to be very lucky to create something innovative without knowing what’s gone before.  The more established the field, the more mastery is typically needed, and acquiring it should be a life long process that evolves with the field, something that a learning culture should encourage.  A culture that values mastery can also value a fresh perspective, but without mastery, nine times out of ten, this will simply reinvent the wheel.  Interestingly, mastery comes in at least two flavors.  Deep knowledge of a subject is of course crucial, but emergent innovation usually comes from the integration of ideas from different areas.  This is where T-shaped innovators, or expert generalists become crucial to the process.  A culture therefore needs to reward both experts in a single field, and these more diversified experts who know a lot about a lot of different stuff, and who can bridge between experts.


3.  Failure as learning and Respect.  It’s now quite fashionable to embrace fast failure, but in many cases there remains a knowing-doing gap.  It’s easy to thoughtfully build it into a strategy, but still freak out when bad data comes in just ahead of an important stage gate in the process!  Also related to this is the productive pause, and taking time out to define a problem.  It is easy for a culture to become action orientated, and reward energetic ‘doers’.  However, taking time out to really define a problem, and think before acting can be at least as important. Respect lies at the heart of these cultural concepts, as few people will willfully fail, or sit around doing nothing.  A culture of respect assumes this.


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Not Just at Desks, Standing Is Now for Meetings, Too

Not Just at Desks, Standing Is Now for Meetings, Too | Personal Best | Scoop.it
New research shows people are most collaborative if there are no chairs at a meeting
Eric Anderson's insight:

The title says it all...

 

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Be a Leader People Want to Work For

Be a Leader People Want to Work For | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Eric Anderson's insight:

There are more than 11 tips--solid principles, actually--in these 11 slides. Short, memorable, actionable...essential.

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Put the Big Rocks In First

Put the Big Rocks In First | Personal Best | Scoop.it
This is a principle so simple and yet so profound, it will completely change your life if you consistently practice it. The big idea is that you must schedule time for your most important priorities first. If you don’t, you will never get to them. Here’s how.
Eric Anderson's insight:

"The main thing is to the keep the main thing the main thing" Stephen Covey reportedly said. To do that, you must know what your "main things" are, which he called "Big Rocks". And to keep those "first things first", you must schedule those Big Rocks during weekly planning and stay true to your purpose in the moment of decision and action daily.

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9 Beach Reads For Ambitious People

9 Beach Reads For Ambitious People | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Instead of bringing a trashy romance novel to the beach this summer, stuff your beach bag with the following productivity books to reenergize before...
Eric Anderson's insight:

What a list! "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People"; "Getting Things Done"; "The Power of Habit"; "Switch"…. an ambitious vacation reading list indeed!

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How To Hack Your To-Do List - YouTube

We talked with David Allen, the author of, "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity," about how to hack through your to-do list and free up ...
Eric Anderson's insight:

The first two steps of the GTD methodology boiled down to a practical 2-minute animated video. 

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The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog - Thinkers 50

The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog - Thinkers 50 | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Marshall Goldsmith is one of the world’s leading execut […]
Eric Anderson's insight:
"Leadership is a Contact Sport: Think." http://youtu.be/GGkZvcERU9MA couple of the key ideas in this video:"Why should I be trusted to control anything else if I cannot even control myself" - Frances Hesselbein.Avoid speaking when angry or out of control. The second I lose control, where is the problem? It's not "out there": it's now "in here."
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The Most Important Hour of Your Life

The Most Important Hour of Your Life | Personal Best | Scoop.it
An executive called me up a few months ago in existential pain. He had spent the last several years pursuing a career path he now admitted was not right for him. He had overstayed his time building a
Eric Anderson's insight:

Did you know that on average people check their phones over 100 a times a day, and at peak 900 times? Not surprisingly, the "urgent" can overwhelm the "important",  and we can get lost in the thick of thin things. This article has several powerful anecdotes and self-reflective questions that can help you determine what's most important to you and your end-in-mind. If you are climbing the ladder of success, be sure it's leaning against the right wall for you. 

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Seven Signs You're Wasting Your Talent

Seven Signs You're Wasting Your Talent | Personal Best | Scoop.it
When we teach career development courses, we start with the basics:You were born, so you have a reason to be here. You have a little flame inside you, and you've had it since you were tiny. Your job
Eric Anderson's insight:

Everyone should read this! Are you growing or stagnating at work? Here are seven signs that should prompt changes to behavior and conversations.

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We make judgments on appearance quicker than we can blink.

According to a 2011 study by Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, P&G, Boston University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, it only takes 250 milliseconds for others to judge your competence, likeability, and trustworthiness – based exclusively on how you look. Two hundred-fifty milliseconds equals a quarter of a second. By comparison, a complete human blink is about 300 to 400 milliseconds. We make judgments on appearance quicker than we can blink.

Eric Anderson's insight:

This info is from a newsletter by Rachel Lamb - Exec|Comm consultant

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Want to Get Ahead? Stop Trying So Hard to Get Ahead.

Want to Get Ahead? Stop Trying So Hard to Get Ahead. | Personal Best | Scoop.it
We often assume that the people most likely to zoom ahead within organizations are the ruthless, pragmatic types who are all about No. 1: People always looking for ways to benefit themselves. “Operators” who try to derive maximum gain from every workplace transaction. According to Adam Grant, that assumption is...
Eric Anderson's insight:

A workplace full of givers is an ideal scenario. This article about Adam Grant's research and book, "Give and Take", explains that generosity and selfless giving can create valuable networks, fulfillment in your work, and drive your own success.

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How to Beat the Twisted Psychology of Busyness

You actually have more free time than you think.
Eric Anderson's insight:
Great takeaway: Reduce fragmentation in your life by scheduling uninterrupted leisure time.
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Jim Collins - Articles - Best New Year's Resolution?

Jim Collins - Articles - Best New Year's Resolution? | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Eric Anderson's insight:

Do you have a "Stop Doing" List?

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6 Secrets to Success Only Early Birds Know

6 Secrets to Success Only Early Birds Know | Personal Best | Scoop.it
It’s been proven time and time again that the most successful people tend to be early risers. The person you spy out your window going for an early morning jog while you’re still in your pajamas
Eric Anderson's insight:

Be more productive, healthier and happier... Get up!

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What College Can’t Do - The New Yorker

What College Can’t Do - The New Yorker | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Much of the conversation around the “crisis in higher education” is needlessly complicated by nostalgia for a premodern university.
Eric Anderson's insight:

A longer, thought-provoking, well-considered article. It reframes the discussion. It reminded me of some of Douglas Rushkoff's ideas from his recent book "Present Shock." If work and business (and busyness) has replaced a higher purpose or higher meaning, and you're in a role or job that doesn't fulfill your personal sense of purpose, more busyness is not the answer. 

 
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The Psychology of Organizational Change

The Psychology of Organizational Change | Personal Best | Scoop.it
“ Most organizational change ignores brain science and psychology research”
Via Anne Leong, Create Wise Leader
Eric Anderson's insight:
Interesting last sentence: "...people's primary motivation in the workplace is neither money or advancement but rather a personal interest in their jobs, a good environment to work in and fulfilling relationships with their boss and colleagues."
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8 Slow, Difficult Steps To Become A Millionaire

8 Slow, Difficult Steps To Become A Millionaire | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Money of course isn't everything. Not by a long shot. Where your definition of success is concerned, money may rank far down the list. Everyone’s definition of “success” is different. Here's mine.
Eric Anderson's insight:

Passion and persistent development of your self, skills and "product" can lead to financial success.  Great quote from Disney that I hadn't seen before: 

We don't make movies to make money, we make money to make more movies. ~Walt Disney

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Is it Zen, or just the art of getting things done?

Is it Zen, or just the art of getting things done? | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Is the path to enlightenment as easy as this simple mental purge? BBC’s David G Allan gives it a try — with surprising results.
Eric Anderson's insight:

Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them. #GTD

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The Secret of Effective Motivation

The Secret of Effective Motivation | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Encourage people to do something for its own sake, not for its benefits.
Eric Anderson's insight:

A key take-away: "Helping people focus on the meaning and impact of their work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of their work but also their financial success."

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Valary Oleinik's curator insight, July 22, 2014 4:51 PM

Often we view motivation as a choice between extrinsic and intrinsic but there is also instrumental motivation to consider.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 22, 2014 7:40 PM

Instrumental and internal motivation mix together. When one exists without the other, it can be problematic. I think of learning that way. Frequently, adhering to the planned curricula overrides the need for us to individually make sense of the learning outcomes. This applies to teachers, as well. When we get a good mix, the results can be incredible.

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New Study Destroys Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 Hour Rule

New Study Destroys Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 Hour Rule | Personal Best | Scoop.it
It takes more — or less — than "deliberate practice."
Eric Anderson's insight:

"There is no doubt that deliberate practice is important, from both a statistical and a theoretical perspective. It is just less important than has been argued," the study's lead author, Brooke Macnamara, said in a statement. "For scientists, the important question now is, what else matters?"

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If you can dream it, you can accomplish it. - YouTube

Everyone has dreams, ambitions, goals. LinkedIn offers a unique set of tools that helps professionals reach them. What's your dream? Picture yourself where y...
Eric Anderson's insight:

This video is inspirational. What do your kids dream that they want to be? What is your dream "when you grow up"?

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The Best Business Book I’ve Ever Read

The Best Business Book I’ve Ever Read | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Not long after I first met Warren Buffett back in 1991, I asked him to recommend his favorite book about business. He didn’t miss a beat: “It’s Business Adventures, by John Brooks,” he said. “I’ll
Eric Anderson's insight:

Take note! The "best business book" recommendation from Warren Buffett and Bill Gates, and a well-written review with application from Gates.

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3 Things About Problem Solving Which Albert Einstein Teaches Us

3 Things About Problem Solving Which Albert Einstein Teaches Us | Personal Best | Scoop.it
Problem solving has a synonym in the corporate world today – fire fighting. Up to 70% of employees’ time at work is spent fire fighting. Thus they spend more than 6 hours out of 9 in a day grappling
Eric Anderson's insight:

Great quote! “If I had an hour to solve a problem, I’d spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions.”

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