HSIE S1: Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6)
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Vaucluse/Watsons Bay Sydney - Google Maps

Vaucluse/Watsons Bay Sydney - Google Maps | HSIE S1:  Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6) | Scoop.it
View maps and find local businesses on the web.
Janey Jankelson's insight:

As an introduction to learning about personal and shared responsibilities towards local features and sites, I decided that a Google Maps search would be a useful start for viewing and identifying natural and built up physical features (and making a comparison). Using a Google maps search allows students to zone in and out of Vaucluse/Watsons Bay and experience locations realistically- individually or collaboratively (Turner, 2013). Google Earth/Maps is a fantastic tool for exploring geographical content and communicating ideas to students about place, space and the world thereby providing an opportunity for: “students to learn to identify features, places, sites and environments and develop knowledge of relationships between them” (HSIE syllabus, 2007, pg 11). Students are able to identify the surrounding features and sites within this neighbourhood, as it is a highly accessible visual tool; “inspiring students to investigate the world and think spatially”(Google, 2012). By searching within Google Maps, natural features (such as: a beach or a park) and built features (e.g. a ferry station, heritage houses, playground), students are able to manually navigate with this suburb to locate the local area and features from an aerial or zoomed in perspective. Zooming in (using the ‘Street View’), students can interact with the environment they observe. An assessment idea could be that teachers could list places and using this tool students are required to ‘find and navigate’ for that place. Google Maps enhances a lesson by incorporating the outside world into the classroom, which is stimulating and engaging. Google Maps, too, enables students to interactively journey beyond their local environment incorporating the idea of a bigger world and environment beyond their suburb.

 

Bibliography:

 

- Turner, M, (2013), Bringing the street into the classroom: A directions lesson with Google Maps, Japan Association for Language Teaching, Retrieved 30/3/14 from http://jalt-publications.org/tlt/departments/myshare/articles/3463-bringing-street-classroom-directions-lesson-google-maps

 

- Google (2012), Google Maps: Education. Retrieved 30/3/14 from http://maps.google.com/help/education/learn/index.html

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Skwirk Stage 1 HSIE online education: The Need for Shelter

Skwirk Stage 1 HSIE online education: The Need for Shelter | HSIE S1:  Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6) | Scoop.it
http://www.skwirk.com/content/upload/Kiddies/HSIE/main.swf Interactive Lessons and Games: 'Natural and Built Features", as well as, 'Changing Environments"
Janey Jankelson's insight:

These two animated interactive videos are great reference points for students to identify the difference between natural and built features in their own local environment and the ways humans interact with them. The videos can activate prior knowledge and introduce concepts such as: responsibility, recycling, pollution and the relationship between land and people (HSIE syllabus, 2007, pg 32). Teachers could begin the lesson with this video and ask students “Why do you think this is happening?” or “what do you think we can do?” which enables high-order thinking and requires students to unravel the idea of personal and shared responsibility. This active involvement, and feedback, encourages engagement and motivation that help students to construct meaning (McInerney,D & McInerney, 2010, p8-12). Interactive, specific content on their local area can thereafter be implemented into the lesson as the videos initiates the ideas. Technology engages students and provides an opportunity for learning content in alternative forms thereby also assisting teachers with new possibilities (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p 181). Learning activities with animation, colours and music gains attention resulting in improved learning. The game at the end tests the comprehension skills of the students building on the outcome EN1-4A in English (English syllabus, 2012, p 59).

 

An assessment idea could be requiring the students to make a natural vs. built comparison table of all the places observed, which could be developed into a localized context task within their local area (ENS1.5). The teacher could provide a group of environmental pictures of their area and the students would sort them accordingly and find ways to value the area. Students can understand that these ideas (manmade versus natural wonders and personal and shared responsibilities) occur globally and locally and can be applied to other areas (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p 246). This video exposes students to the fact that the world extends beyond their immediate environment, hence why it is a general, non-contextual video for children.

 

Bibliography:


NSW Board of Studies (2012) English K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

McInerney,D & McInerney, V., (2010), Educational Psychology: Constructing learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia

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GOING GREEN! (Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle!)

A song about how to take care of the Earth! This can be applied locally, nationally or globally.

Janey Jankelson's insight:

 A global perspective on a particular topic is essential for teachers to embed into their lessons. Thinking globally allows students to gain a sense of responsibility about their local land and community in contrast with other cultures around the nation and world. Implementing a global perspective enables one’s sense of being part of a continuum and an individual with a purpose to assist the future (Browett & Ashman, 2010, back cover). This fun, child-friendly song about ‘Going Green- Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ introduces key global ideas to students in a captivating interactive form. The concepts of ‘Reduce, reuse and recycle’ can be applied to a local, national or global level (HSIE syllabus, 2007, p 31). Another resource is the book “In the Bin”, which is a rhyming picture book on environmental issues as mentioned in the video (http://www.kelliebollard.com.au/books.html# ). This could supplement the video/song in a picture book form, which makes learning about environmental safety and issues appealing.

 

A teacher could create a lesson by playing (or teaching) the ‘Going Green’ song to students, thereafter read the ‘In The Bin’ book and together read the ‘How to Help’ ideas (http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Environmental_checklist.pdf ). It would also be very useful for students to understand another culture and their environment where a teacher could use one of Oxfam’s resources (https://www.oxfam.org.au/act/resources-for-teachers/classroom-resources/ ).

After introducing these ideas, students could brainstorm in groups and discuss through a compare and contrast/PNQ method about how people can look after the environment and some ways people don’t look after the world. An assessment could be a drawing that a child makes about themselves being responsible in their environment or a Flow Chart/Futures Wheel (http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/1840.html) to finalize their thoughts and ideas on global environmental issues. Through these activities of identifying the relationship between peoples’ uses and the environment, students are able to understand personal and shared responsibilities about caring for their environment (HSIE syllabus, 2007, p 31). By implementing the differing cultures’ living environment, students are able to compare their own and draw on differences and similarities using their global framework mind. This can develop an appreciation of their local environment and the impact their care may have on the future (HSIE syllabus, 2007, p31).

 

Bibliography:

Browett, J., & Ashman, G., (2010), Thinking Globally: Global Perspectives in the early years classroom, Ausralian Government: Aus Aid

 

Bollard, K, (2011), In The Bin, Growing Up Greener: Australia

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How Does Your Garden Grow?

How Does Your Garden Grow? | HSIE S1:  Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6) | Scoop.it

A great resource for teachers to use within this area for students to investigate the global idea of sustainability and responsibility towards the environment. This program is run by the local historic working estate site, Vaucluse House.

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Welcome to Watsons Bay - YouTube

"Welcome to Watsons Bay" scenic video

Janey Jankelson's insight:

This You Tube video explains, describes and visually illustrates the area of Watsons Bay/Vaucluse. This resource introduces students to identifying the natural and built features in this immediate relatable environment seen through the restaurant situated on the beach. The video tours the coexistence between manmade and natural environments by showing parks, beaches, cafes and buildings in the area and the human interaction that encompasses it all. The use of historical dates, and Aboriginal history and music, adds to the framework of understanding the area’s development.

 

Mishra and Koehler (2006, p.1030) discuss how videos synthesize information, which help students make links between ideas. This video assists teachers and students to compare and contrast features in the environment and helps understand the relationship towards local features, sites and places within the area. Using a video resource, such as this one, helps students make connections between two seemingly unrelated ideas.

This video could serve as lesson where a teacher could pause certain aspects of the video and ask students to pinpoint features that are either natural or built and link it to the environment and people. By the end of the topic, students would be able to identify different features, whether man-made or built using a compare or contrast method of either discussion or drawing images to represent. In groups, students could thereafter discuss, via a brainstorming method, what are some ways to be individually responsible towards these features and sites. If extra scaffolding is required, sentences or images could be placed on the board for assistance and thereafter requiring own/prior knowledge. Students, too, could elect a site mentioned and explore human awareness for communal environmental maintenance.

The uses from this resource can be effective, simple and creative.

 

Bibliography:

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054.

 

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A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction

A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction | HSIE S1:  Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6) | Scoop.it
Janey Jankelson's insight:

This resource is a useful lesson plan for students focusing on the environment through an Aboriginal perspective. By having a local Aboriginal person present to the students creates a sense of authenticity providing a rich understanding of cultural differences and recognizing the special relationship Aboriginal people have with the land (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p 385). Aboriginal perspectives help students understand the shared history of the land and features within the environment (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p 390).

 

The excursion option (to a local National Park with an Aboriginal perspective) suggested within this resource can be implemented via the Woollahra Municipal Council ‘Bush Tucker Walk’ that is offered in Nielsen Park as it has remnants of Aboriginal art engravings (http://www.woollahra.nsw.gov.au/events/events_list/environmental/bush_tucker_walk_-_october5) (or the excursion option run by the NSW government in the link below). This walk incorporates Aboriginal culture of tasting bush tucker whilst exploring the area- enabling students to gain a concrete relatable experience. Students are then able to identify local areas with Aboriginal significance, adding to the notion of natural and built environments and people’s interaction. A teacher, too, could use this website (http://www.sydneybarani.com.au/) and the interactive timeline included in conjunction with the lesson to show other local Aboriginal areas within Sydney, encouraging the connection to the broader context. An assessment option for this lesson can be centralized around a discussion of observational records from the excursion or from the speaker. By participating with the community and implementing an Aboriginal perspective, non-indigenous and Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders are able to mutually respect different cultures, demonstrate an awareness of features in the local area and land history and understand the shared responsibility towards the environment (http://www.reconciliation.org.au/about/).

 

 

Bibliography:

Barani Sydney Aboriginal History, (2013), City of Sydney http://www.sydneybarani.com.au/

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B, (2011), Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Reconciliation Australia, (2014), http://www.reconciliation.org.au/about/

 

Woollahra Municipal Council, (2014), Bush Tucker Walk, ESORA: Sydney, http://www.woollahra.nsw.gov.au/events/events_list/environmental/bush_tucker_walk_-_october5

 

NSW Government- NSW National Parks  and Wildlife Services: Nielsen Park  The Need for Shelter http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/NationalParks/parkExcursions.aspx?id=N0039&evId=20131106090455201

 

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The Macquarie Lighthouse, Australia's First Lighthouse

The Macquarie Lighthouse, Australia's First Lighthouse | HSIE S1:  Personal and Communal Responsibilities Towards the Environment (ENS1.5 &1.6) | Scoop.it

A local built place where students are able to explore and understand the responsibility towards valuing this site.

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