Personal and Class Needs and How they are Met for Early Stage 1
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The Little Red Yellow Black Website-an introduction to Indigenous Australia

The Little Red Yellow Black Website-an introduction to Indigenous Australia | Personal and Class Needs and How they are Met for Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it

A focus on Families

Monica Touma's insight:

Given that the website has been created by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), it is a highly trusted site with authentic information on indigenous culture. As well as having its own publishing house, Aboriginal Studies Press, The AIATSIS library provides one of the most comprehensive collections of print materials on Australian Indigenous studies in the world. The website is a primer to the book The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia.Though the information present in the site is not appropriate for the learning level of kindergarteners the material can be adapted to suit the needs of the students in their understanding of how personal needs are met in Indigenous Communities.  

 

The book itself has comprehensive information on kinship family structures that can help direct the teacher when planning a lesson. For example, students can identify the roles and responsibilities of members in an Indigenous family compared to how this might be similar or different from their own.  Students can then draw, name and label their own family members and share their drawings with a partner. This activity can then extend to how families meet these needs in an Indigenous family compared to their own.  This can be achieved by asking children to describe a situation when a family member has provided them with a basic need (NEALS, 2011).

 

Reference:

AIATSIS. (2012). The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia. Australia: Aboriginal Studies Press.

 

NEALS. (2011). Early stage 1 teaching programs. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/teaching/earlystage1/index.htm

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Classroom Objects -English Language - YouTube

Identifying and Sharing Classroom Objects

Monica Touma's insight:

This resource focuses on achieving a level of understanding related to how children can meet their learning needs at school by first identifying the items required to meet those needs. This video lists the potential objects found in a classroom which, as each item is mentioned, children can point to the object in the classroom or where it is located. This is an excellent resource given that visuals facilitate the greatest memory recall which Wiman and Mierhenry (1969) conclude: “…people will generally remember: 10% of what they read, 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see and 50% of what they see and hear (p.107). ” However this video should not act alone as a teaching resource.

 

For a teaching idea, begin by asking the students what are some of the things they need to help them learn in the classroom. Follow this by asking them to draw the basic needs they see in the classroom such as colouring in pencils, reading books, whiteboard, teacher etc. As a potential numeracy activity, ask the children to count how many items they have drawn. Teachers can follow this up with a literacy activity by asking the children to write down the name of the object they have drawn.

 

This video also paves way for the teacher to explain the need for students to be respectful of their peers and the benefits of that to their classmates. This can be achieved by showing a YouTube video called ‘Sharing Cookies: Sesame Street: Little Children, Big Challenges.’ This video complements the first in that it explains how those needs can be met by sharing and why it is important to share. Since brains are programmed to remember experiences that have an emotional element, which is evident in the clip, videos have a powerful ability to relay experience through the emotions evoked by images (Wiman and Meierhenry, 1969, p. 107). Another teaching idea following from the Sesame Street video is for students to role play some behaviours where there might be situations requiring them to share. Conclude by showing the students a YouTube video called ‘Sesame Street Sharing Song.’

 

Reference:

Wiman, R. V. & Meierhenry, W. C. (Eds.). (1969). Educational media: Theory into practice. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

 

YouTube. (2013). Sesame Street: Sharing Song. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewhwY5-EP38  

 

YouTube. (2014). Sharing Cookies: Sesame Street: Little Children, Big Challenges. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Qg6JwNEbXs

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Basic needs and children's rights | Global Education

Basic needs and children's rights | Global Education | Personal and Class Needs and How they are Met for Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Monica Touma's insight:

This website provides five comprehensive activities related to children’s rights and the rights of children globally. It is aimed at level F-2 which is equivalent to NSW K-2. The aim of activity one is for Students to understand why their name is an important part of their identity, central to their sense of self and belonging as well as a key to access services. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, it is essential for individuals to find a sense of belonging in order to reach self-actualisation (Lester, 1990, p.1187). Activity two delves deeper into this concept by developing an understanding that children around the world have the right to have their needs met and protected. Some of the activities are a little bit advanced for Kindergarten and this needs to be taken into consideration when planning lessons.

 

Activity four is a springboard in creating awareness that play is not only fun, but essential in developing language skills, social skills, empathy and imagination in children (Alliance for Childhood, 2009). The International Centre for Human Rights Education (2008) proceeds to say that children have the right to play and rest (Equitas, 2008).  In this activity, children explore and experience games and toys from around the world. If those toys are easily accessible, the teacher can assign each child with a toy from other countries and get the child to explain to the class which country it originates from and how does the toy/game work. This can take the form of an assessment task relating to the English syllabus whereby students engage in the common activity of Show and Tell.

 

Reference:

Alliance for Childhood. (2009). Crisis in the Kindergarten: Why Children Need to Play in School. Retrieved April 6, 2014 from http://www.allianceforchildhood.org/publications

 

Equitas. (2008). Play it Fair: Human Rights Education Toolkit for Children. Montreal: Quebec.

 

Lester, D. (1990). Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 2(11), 1187-I 188.

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Workers in the Commumity

Workers in the Commumity | Personal and Class Needs and How they are Met for Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Monica Touma's insight:

Skwirk is and interactive website that covers a range of topics aimed at the younger primary years.The Workers in the Community link is the focus in addressing the syllabus related to educating students on personal and class needs and how they are met. This is an age appropriate resource for early Stage 1 given its vibrant colours and user-friendly access to resources within the site.  It is an excellent tool for children not only for the aforementioned reasons but as a means to equip students with computational skills. It is also good for a more collaborative/whole class approach in learning where the website could be put up on an interactive whiteboard (Smith, 2014). The website however addresses concepts on a basic level which would then require teachers to expand on these ideas.

 

A sub-link under Workers in the Community is Wants and Needs. This link takes the students to four mediums of accessing information. The first link precedes children through an explanation of the difference between wants and needs. By the end of the cartoon animation, an activity is available where students categorise items as a need or want. Teachers can expand on this activity by asking students to categorise items around the room into needs or wants which would address class as well as personal needs. This would be a great segway for the teacher to explain the source and cost of these materials to support the need to care for classroom resources. As a teaching idea, students can role play some behaviours showing appropriate care and organisation of classroom resources.  This would make for a good introduction in arranging a roster of classroom helpers.

 

Reference:

NEALS. (2011). Early stage 1 teaching programs. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/teaching/earlystage1/index.htm

 

Smith, P. (2014). Great Benefits of Technology in Education. Retrieved April 5, 2014 from http://edtechreview.in/news/705-benefits-of-technology-in-education

 

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Mr McGee and the Apple Tree

Mr McGee and the Apple Tree | Personal and Class Needs and How they are Met for Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it

From Tree to Shop

Monica Touma's insight:

Mr McGee and the Apple Tree is a wonderful text that illustrates the sequence of events of an apple from tree to shop. This website provides a means with which to purchase the resource. Picture books are a great way to engage children in new concepts (Beck and McKeon, 2001, p.10) Research suggests the most valuable aspect of the read-aloud activity is that it gives children experience with decontextualized language, requiring them to make sense of ideas that are about something beyond the here and now (Beck and McKeown, 2001, p. 10)

 

As an activity, get the class to cooperatively create a flow chart or sequence of events of the apple from tree to grocery store. Expand the concept to other products and services by collecting and exhibiting some images such as food items, water, electricity, clothing, cars, doctor, houses, and newspapers for example. Ponder with the children questions such as where these products come from, where we buy them, do they come from animals/plants or whether or not the items are manufactured. It is imperative to then discuss why we need these things, consider what life would be like if basic needs are not met and to identify who provides these needs (NEALS, 2011).

 

As an assessment task, get the children to create a chart of products and services and the name of the person who provides the service or the product. For example, meat is the product and butcher is the person who provides the service. Given that the assessment is aimed for students in kindergarten, teachers should provide students with the vocabulary needed. Children can cut and paste or draw pictures to complement the words.

 

Reference:

Beck, I.L & McKeown, M.G. (2001). Text talk: Capturing the benefits of read-aloud experiences for young children. The Reading Teacher, 55 (1), 10-20. 

 

NEALS. (2011). Early stage 1 teaching programs. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/teaching/earlystage1/index.htm

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