Persepolis
26 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Persepolis

Persepolis | Persepolis | Scoop.it

The story was set in Tehran, Iran during the revolution of  1980-1988. The main characters in the story are Satrapi, and her mom and  dad. From the age of six, Satrapi witnessed her parents participate in demonstrations against the Islamic regime and always wanted to join into the fight of women's rights and equality. She was steadily informed on the current events happening from past and present stories from her father, mother, and grandmother. As time moved on, their country started changing laws on like how women should wear veils out in public, not being able to leave the country (set boarders), and how you must obey the government at all times. Satrapi witnessed killings, nuclear bombings, and political disputes. Soon she grew up, at age 14 living in fear of her town being destroyed and debating if should leave and live or stay and fight for her country. At the end of the book her parents decided to ship her off to France to a school to get a better education, and leaves with a broken heart...to be continuted

 

The theme of this story is that no matter what was going on in the world, corruption, violence,distruction, you have to remember what your values are. You have to remember your cultural background.

 

This book was really good to me. I usually can't focus on a good book with just alot of clumped up words, but with the images and comments that the characters say is very cool. Some may look at it and say there it wouldn't have that much information in a graphic novel but it has alot of imformation to learn about.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Iran Map

Iran Map | Persepolis | Scoop.it
Jewelle's insight:

This image of the country of Iran and the Captal, Tehran. The Setting in the Story Persepolis

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Raising a Child in Iran's Cultural Divide

Coping with the gulf between Iranian private and public life is a difficult skill even for adults to manage. So what should we teach our children?
Jewelle's insight:

 Azadeh Moaveni is born and grew up in Iran, and she found herself pregnant with her first baby. Thinking about her son/daugther's life, she was concerned on the school system in the present day. She talked to a friend and heard that her son was being brainwashed by the teachers there."The very idea that I would be competing with my child's teachers and other role models over basic values (the role of religion in daily life, whether or not Western culture is corrupt) is intimidating. What if they win out, even for a phase? What's even scarier is that by doing the right thing — poising your kid's mind against extremist mullahs and their dogma — you may not be instilling tolerance, but safety hazards."(Moaveni) She wants to teach her child the cultural ways of Iran in secret so her child won't be corrupt in the future. 

 

In the book, Persepolis, when Marji first started school her teachers just started enforcing the governements policies( like wearing veils in public for women). But the school system was changing against the cultural system that it first started with. In the book there were many changes that effected Marji."I Agreed with my mother. I too tried to think only of life. However, it wasn't always easy at achool, they lined us up twice a day to mourn the war dead. They put on funeral marched, and we had to beat our breasts. Hitting yourself is one of the country's rituals. During certain religious ceremonies, some people flagellated themselves brutally."(Satrapi) There were expressing cultural changes throughout the country that changed the ritual of school system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

World History In Context - Document

World History In Context - Document | Persepolis | Scoop.it
World History In Context
Jewelle's insight:

 Summary: In the article it talks about how young children are involving
themselves in many different groups to fight against the government. In the article it says , " Although youth movements are modern phenomena, youths' collective involvement in politics is not new to the Middle Eastern societies. The futuwwa brotherhoods in medieval periods consisted of semireligious, voluntary, urban, youth organizations engaged in acts of chivalry (javan-mardi) protecting the less fortunate, supporting public
causes, and at times acting in parallel with official security forces.Though not always viewed positively or engaged in benevolent acts, the futuwwa groups represent early forms of collective action by youths in Muslim societies. These youth organizations imposed strict ethical standards on their members and required strong group loyalty." (Mahdi) Student activists deal with sociological and political factors with the problems with the country of Iran. They work hard to make a difference and to add more young activists to groups.  
      
 Connection: As a young child in the story, Marji knew alot about the  Iranian government and the harm it was bringing to the iranian people. She wanted to fight for her people so bad that she would ask her mother and father if she could join them, but she was only 10 and it would be too  dangerous for her to be out. Like the article, she decided to risk the chance of something happening to her to defend her country. "My faith was not unshakable. The year of the Revolution I had to take action. So I put my prophetic destiny aside for a while. We demostrated in the garden of our house."(Pg 10 Satrapi) In this passage, Marji is so engaged with the world and deadicated to her country that she wants to help in any way she can to fight. Throughout the story, she is joining in more demostrations and more rallys to feel more apart of the cause to fight the government.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Iran Revolution

Iran Revolution | Persepolis | Scoop.it

"The Iranian Islamic Republic Army demonstrates in solidarity with people in the street during the Iranian revolution." (Getty)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Children of the Revolution ; Islamic Iran not for sale !

"Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad insists the capitalist system, established by Israelis, is on verge of collapse, adding that the 9/11 was a set-up to ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

GIC | Article: Iranian Revolution: Lingering Issues

Jewelle's insight:

The Iranian Revolution was a series of mass demonstrations against the Iranian monarchy through 1978, culminating in the abdication of Iran’s leader, Shah Reza Pahlavi, in January 1979. One month later Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, a Shia religious leader whose anti-Shahist sermons had inspired many protesters, returned from exile in France and declared an Islamic Republic. He created a new governmental structure, placing himself at the top as “Supreme Leader,” a position he occupied until his death in 1989. His rule and legacy continues to have vast implications for Iran to this day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

GIC | Article: The Iran-Iraq War: 1980 to 1988

GIC | Article: The Iran-Iraq War: 1980 to 1988 | Persepolis | Scoop.it
Jewelle's insight:

This passage talks about the conflicts between Iran and Iraq and the divisions between the Middle East. This conflict soon caused the terrible Iranian War, stemming from the Persians against the Arabs, where they were questioned their form of identity. From their ethnic group, their religious group, or to their nationality, this became the point where people had to choose. One of the conflicts that led to the Iran-Iraq War was a dispute over the shared border between the two countries.  
 

In Persepolis, Marj's home town is Tehran, the capital
 of Iran, and there was many bombings in her area. She would fear that in
 the middle of the night that her town and everyone she loved would be  destroyed in a firey explosion. There were a couple times in the book that the sirens would go off in Tehran and everyone would stop what they were doing flee to the basement. For example, Marj and her family were having a party(which was forbidden and would be arrested if caught) and all of a  sudden the sirens went off. "Suddlenly, sirens started to wail...and my
aunt did too. I found myself with the newborn baby we had been celebrating in my arms. Her mother had already abandoned her. Since that day, I've had doubts about the so-called " maternal instinct"."(107 Satrapi) This made me think about the phrase "Every man for himself" because everyone is set on staying alive and when it comes down to it, will leave anyone they care about to save themselves.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Gettysburg Times - Google News Archive Search

Gettysburg Times - Google News Archive Search | Persepolis | Scoop.it

This Newspaper was released in September 22, 1980. It talks about the bombing of 7 airports all around Iran and its capital, Tehran.

Jewelle's insight:

In this newspaper article, in September 22 of 1980, 7 Iran airports were bombed by Iraqi Migs. The cause was reported over Iraqi News that " Iraq forces attacked after Iranian gunboats opened fire on a British cargo ship sailing toward the Iraqi port of Basrah" (Gettysbury Times) This soon causing the despute between Iran and Iraq, fighting along the borders. Secretary of Defense, Harold Brown told Cbs-T, said that " The border fighting was not a major war" but added " I think it is very dangerous to both of those countries: It's very dangerous to all countries in the region and it's potentially dangerous to the peace of the world."( Gettysburg Times).  
       In the story, Marji was faced with many bomb threats in
 Tehran. In the story, Marj heard a bomb go off while she was in the jewelry store and learned it landed in her neighborhood. "A few days after our trip, and just before I had to go back to school, I went to my father's office."Type this and make three copies" "OK"..BOOM.."Help!!" It was the first time i'd seen fighter jets. " Too much! it's our army flying!" "I don't think so. Those are probably Iraqis." " What? Why do you say that???" "Because they don't look like our F-14s!" It was a tough call, but dad was an engineer. He was a specialist. Iranian or Iraqi, the jets hugged the ground before suddenly zooming up into the sky right before the mountains on the horizon. "Quick, the radio. "Here, dad!" "Iraqi Migs have bombed tehran..." "No! the bastards!" (Satrapi pg 80). In this, the Iraqi Migs have just dropped bombs on Tehran hile Marji and her father were in themiddle of working. They struggle to figure out the answers of what planes and why it decided to strike there.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jewelle
Scoop.it!

Legacy of Nonviolent Movements in Iran | Watch Documentary Online Free

Legacy of Nonviolent Movements in Iran | Watch Documentary Online Free | Persepolis | Scoop.it
This film takes a look into the two most recent mass movements in Iran’s history: the 1979 Revolution that brought the clerics to power, and the 2009 mass
Jewelle's insight:

This documentary films the protests against the Iranian government. This film put the Iranian Revolution in to a chilling
 perspective of brutal bloody beatings, mass women rights demonstrations, and destruction of public property. "This film takes a look into the two most recent mass movements in Iran’s history: the 1979 Revolution that brought the clerics to power, and the 2009 mass protests, known as the Green Movement, that threatened the foundation of the same clerical rule. The film presents interviews with Ivan Marovic, a founder of OTPOR, the Serbian movement that ended the rule of Slobodan Milosevic and Mohsen Sazgara, a founding member of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, among other activists."(Documentary Heaven) 
      
     Connection: Throughout the whole book there were chapters on
     demonstrations, violent protestings, and

more...
No comment yet.