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Landrace Gardening: Saving Landrace Seeds - Mother Earth News

Landrace Gardening: Saving Landrace Seeds - Mother Earth News | Permaculture University | Scoop.it

"Seed saving is an integral part of landrace gardening. We can localize our gardens to our specific growing conditions and way of doing things by planting genetically diverse seed, allowing them to cross pollinate, and then saving and replanting the seeds.

 

Saving seeds doesn’t have to be the complicated highly involved and technical process that some writers would have you believe."

 

 

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Beautiful Cob House Built By Retired Teacher With Only $250 Dollars

Beautiful Cob House Built By Retired Teacher With Only $250 Dollars | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Beautiful Cob House Built By Retired Teacher With Only $250 Dollars
PlanetSave.com
Ever think about building your own house? Perhaps a cob house? I know that I certainly have.
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Three way street: Permaculture ethics on the ground

Three way street: Permaculture ethics on the ground | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
These are seeds. They're from my garden. I collected them this year. I've never been more proud.
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A Plant Based Diet - You Can Grow That! - Gardening Jones

A Plant Based Diet - You Can Grow That! - Gardening Jones | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
A plant based diet is as close as your garden gate. Go ahead and try it, after all- what have you got to lose?
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Huge List of Homesteading Skills to Learn

Huge List of Homesteading Skills to Learn | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Have you always dreamed of living in the country and becoming a homesteader ? Great news, you can build your homesteading skills anywhere you live while saving to buy the perfect piece of property to suit your family’s needs. It takes a long time to build the skills you will need to be self sufficient, here is a list to get you started. Don’t get discouraged, you will have to go outside your comfort zone but it will be worth tackling every challenging task.
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Why your grandparents didn’t have food allergies…but you do

Why your grandparents didn’t have food allergies…but you do | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
by CATHERINE CROW Did your grandparents have food allergies? Mine sure didn’t. A stark comparison to the growing epidemic of food allergies, worsening with every generation. So why did your grandparents not have food allergies?
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Q&A With Joel Salatin: A Tree-Hugging, Christian, Libertarian Farmer (Part Two)

Q&A With Joel Salatin: A Tree-Hugging, Christian, Libertarian Farmer (Part Two) | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Alongside a recent trip to Polyface Farm, I interviewed farmer Joel Salatin. In the second part of my interview (read part one), he discusses government regulation and the best way to “feed the world.”
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How to build a permaculture suburb

How to build a permaculture suburb | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, all the talk in hippy circles was of the end of suburbia. But what if we could create suburbs that are designed to function in harmony with their surroundings? That’s the concept behind Village Homes in Davis, California. From passive solar housing through neighborhood fruit orchards, chicken coops and beehives to a carefully designed system of swales which is intended to let rainwater percolate into the ground, this 70 acre, 225-home site is about as harmonious as one can image any suburb to be.
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Winter in the Beeyard - Mother Earth News

Winter in the Beeyard - Mother Earth News | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
This is the time of year when things get really slow in the beeyard, so take advantage of it! It’s the perfect time for building and repairing woodenware that you’ll need when the spring buildup starts (it’ll be here before you know it!). Re-gluing, re-nailing, replacing broken or rotted wood, putting together and wiring frames, checking veils for holes that need closing up (nothing’s worse than a bee in your veil!)—that kind of thing.
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Permaculture with Jack Spirko Part 16 - A Survival House and Survival Garden Permaculture Style - YouTube

It seems that I have described "Y2K Dave's Survival Garden" from Geoff Lawton and Bill Mollison's PDC on DVD course many times. Every time I find it very difficult to convey in audio format so I decided to do a video and in spite of my poor artistic skills I think it will make a lot more sense this time around. Effectively what Y2K Dave ended up with was a bug out location within a bug out location and the construction cost was about 1,000 dollars. It certainly isn't a 3 bed, 2 bath condo on the water but it would keep you cool in summer, warm in winter and dry in the rain. The garden is well protected from predators, the up grade pond produces water pressure on demand and the swale systems could produce more perennial foods then a small family could need. If you like this and haven't seen Geoff Lawton's new video yet called, How to Survive the Coming Crisis you should really get on over to his website and view it, it is 30 incredible minutes on creating fully sustainable food based systems. http://bit.ly/geofflawton
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General Mills Announces GMO Ingredient Changes

General Mills Announces GMO Ingredient Changes | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
General Mills Inc. has started producing Cheerios free of genetically modified content, making the 73-year-old breakfast cereal one of the highest-profile brands to change in the face of growing complaints over such ingredients from activist groups and some consumers.
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Nuts for the Northeast- Keith Morris with Mark Shepard at NOFA MA January 11, 2014

Nuts for the Northeast- Keith Morris with Mark Shepard at NOFA MA January 11, 2014 | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Since the dawn of time, nuts have been some of the most important food plants for human beings. Nut trees and shrubs offer some of the most nutrient dense foods, provide habitat, show the potential for a ‘carbon-negative’ and flood resilient agriculture, and are economically valuable for a variety of products in addition to nuts themselves.
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Our Aquaponics: How to adjust pH in aquaponics systems

Our Aquaponics: How to adjust pH in aquaponics systems | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Our Aquaponics: How to adjust pH in aquaponics systems http://t.co/Le078DuCS0
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Episode-1269- You Are Your Only Solution

Episode-1269- You Are Your Only Solution | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
TweetDay in and day out I get emails from listeners that mean well, but frankly most don’t get it. They are emails about passing a law for this or that, as if that would really fix anything. Franky I am … Continue reading →...
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Landrace Gardening: Survival of the Fittest

Landrace Gardening: Survival of the Fittest | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
A photo essay showing off the stunning success of landrace gardening on my farm. Landrace gardening is a traditional method of growing food in which the seeds to be planted next year result from the survival of the fittest in a particular garden in previous years. Landrace varieties become attached to a region, and thrive in that region. Landrace varieties are genetically variable so that as conditions change from year to year the population can adapt to the changes. The first landrace crop that I grew was Astronomy Domine sweet corn. It was the product of a breeding project by Alan Bishop of Bishop’s Homegrown in Pekin, Indiana. The essence of the project was to throw as many cultivars of sweet corn as possible into a field, let them cross pollinate, and see what survived and how the descendants fared. Around 200 cultivars contributed their diversity to the gene pool. Some plants grew vigorously, many grew decent, and some struggled to survive. I saved seed from the parents that thrived and that did okay, and replanted the next year. The results were fantastic! I was hooked on growing genetically diverse crops and saving seeds from them. My version of Astronomy Domine had diverged from the original version. My population is about ten days shorter season than the original. That is to be expected because in my cold mountain valley a crop has to produce quickly and thrive in cool nights if I am to get a harvest. After the stunning success of the sweet corn project, I determined that I wanted to explore growing other varieties of localized landrace crops. Melons seemed like a good test project, because they have traditionally done poorly in my valley, and because they are highly popular. Melons are an out-breeding crop, so they cross-pollinate readily, and can produce huge numbers of genetically unique individuals. Generating lots of variety is one of the key principals of landrace gardening. More diversity provides more opportunities to find family groups that thrive in any particular garden. To start the cantaloupe project, I gathered together the seeds from the few melons that had produced a fruit the previous year, and I added to them as many varieties as I could obtain: from local farm stands, from the Internet, from seed catalogs, from the grocery store. I planted a packet of seeds per row until I had planted a large patch of melons. Then I sat back and watched one melon disaster after another. Some varieties didn’t germinate. Some varieties were eaten by bugs within days of emerging. Others just sat there and shivered in the cold. Some individuals shrugged off the adverse growing conditions and grew robustly. The two best growing plants produced more fruit than the rest of the patch combined. Here are photos that demonstrate the differences. Each seed was planted on the same day, a few feet from each other in the garden. The photos were taken a few minutes apart. The first photo shows what an average cantaloupe from a seed packet grows like in my garden. The second photo shows what a well adapted cantaloupe grows like in my garden (after only one year of selection). I collected the seed from the best growing melons and replanted it. Oh my heck!!! I was used to trying to grow maladapted cantaloupes. I never imagined that cantaloupes might actually produce an abundant harvest for me: I was harvesting a hundred pounds of fruit at a time! Early in the process of developing a locally adapted cantaloupe population, I was contacted by a grower who grows in the same mountain valley as my farm. Since that time, we have shared seeds liberally with each other. I trust her seeds implicitly, because we share the same climate, the same soil, the same altitude, the same bugs, and the same philosophy towards diversity. Her seeds thrive in my garden because our gardens are so similar. I love our collaboration. It is nice to see the grandchildren of my seeds coming back home to grow among their cousins. Half of the watermelon and cantaloupe seeds that I planted this spring were grown by her. She provided most of my sweet pepper seed. I am coming to favor the yellow watermelons that are emerging from the collaboration. They taste excellent and grow well in our valley. When did anyone ever say that before about watermelons in our valley? The watermelon project included collaborators from around the world. We have shared seeds liberally among all participants. The most reliable imports into my garden have consistently came from the collaborator in my valley. To start the watermelon project, I planted around 700 seeds: A few seeds each from as many varieties as we could get our hands on. The first planting included the promiscuously pollinated hybrid offspring of hundreds of varieties. I harvested about 5 fruits the first year. That is great odds for a survival of the fittest plant breeding program. One of those fruits was from the variety of watermelon that my daddy has preserved for decades in our valley. Because of my success with cantaloupes, I decided to convert all of my crops to locally-adapted survival-of-the-fittest landraces. Spinach was among the first crops that I converted. It was the simplest for me. I planted a number of varieties of spinach next to each other and weeded out the plants that were slow growing, or quick to bolt. About 4 of the 12 varieties were suitable for my garden. I allowed them to cross pollinate and set seed. This spring someone gave me a packet of spinach seeds so I thought I’d plant it next to my locally-adapted landrace to compare them. See that little speck of green that I marked with a red dot? That is the imported spinach: Already gone to seed. I pulled it and laid it next to my landrace spinach to demonstrate the huge difference in growth. They were planted on the same day a few feet from each other. Sometimes when I start adapting a new crop to my garden, I import hundreds of varieties to trial. Other times I take a slow and steady approach, by growing one new cultivar in the row next to my crop. If the new variety does well then I save seeds from it and add them to the landrace. If the new variety does poorly, then it might contribute some pollen. I do not try to keep varieties pure, other than basic things like keeping hot peppers separate from sweet peppers, and sweet corn separate from popcorn. Turnips are a crop that I approached by the slow and steady method. They already grew well for me, so there wasn’t any reason to search far and wide for something that would do better. I plant another packet of seed every few years, and may include a couple of roots from the new strain among the seed-parents the following year. The dry bean landrace has been fun for me because it is tremendously colorful. It draws lots of attention at the farmer’s market. I started it by planting beans, all jumbled up together from as many species and cultivars as I could acquire. I think that there were around 12 species, many of which I had never grown before. I planted them in hot weather, not knowing that some of them are cool-weather species. I didn’t know if they were bush beans or pole beans. Nevertheless, some of them grew very well and produced a harvest in my short growing season. I collected the seeds of the survivors and planted them a couple weeks ago. This year I am expecting them to do great, because I selected (mostly) for bush types whose parents thrived in my garden. I tend to give my crops names that describe the plant or its use, such as “dry bush bean landrace”. “Dry bean” describes what the crop is used for, “bush” describes how it grows, and “landrace” implies that it is genetically diverse and has been localized to my garden by passing the survival of the fittest test. Some crops can achieve the landrace label in my garden in one growing season, other crops may take many years before I could say that they are thriving in my garden. I could write and write about how successful landrace gardening has been for me, but it would just be more of the same: The locally adapted plants thriving, and the imports from far away struggling to survive. I hope that this post has helped show in photos why I believe that landrace gardening is a path towards food security through common sense and traditional methods. Next time I’ll write more about naming all the new plants that arise in a landrace garden. Joseph Lofthouse grows vegetables in a cold mountain valley where he practices the art of landrace gardening in order to feed his community more effectively. Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/landrace-gardening-survival-zbcz1306.aspx#ixzz2pNcbQFvO
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Heating a Greenhouse with Compost and Manure

Heating a Greenhouse with Compost and Manure | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Maddy visits Charles Dowding's No Dig market garden and is inspired by his hot bed that both heats his greenhouse and helps raise tender plants. She goes home and experiments with hot composting in mid winter to heat a small greenhouse.
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Gardening in Winter with Container Herbs

Gardening in Winter with Container Herbs | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Growing culinary herbs during winter in containers. Suggestions for harvest and eating. Includes basil, chives, cilantro, coriander, fennel, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage and thyme.
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The Congressman Who Went Off the Grid

The Congressman Who Went Off the Grid | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
When Roscoe Bartlett was in Congress, he latched onto a particularly apocalyptic issue, one almost no one else ever seemed to talk about: America’s dangerously vulnerable power grid. In speech after late-night speech on the House floor, Bartlett hectored the nearly empty chamber: If the United States doesn’t do something to protect the grid, and soon, a terrorist or an act of nature will put an end to life as we know it. Bartlett loved to conjure doomsday visions: Think post-Sandy New York City without power—but spread over a much larger area for months at a time. He once recounted a conversation he claimed to have had with unnamed Russian officials about how they could take out the United States: They would “detonate a nuclear weapon high above your country,” he recalled them saying, “and shut down your power grid—and your communications—for six months or so.”
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How To Make Calendula Salve

How To Make Calendula Salve | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Carl Legge describes how to make a Calendula salve, a traditional healing balm or ointment, and explains the meaning of the plant's name, Calendula Officinalis. It is all Latin and Greek to him!
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Architect Couple Build a Backyard Office From a Shipping Container

Architect Couple Build a Backyard Office From a Shipping Container | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Karl Wanaselja and his business partner and wife Cate Leger from Berkley, California opted to build a home office using a retired shipping container. They chose to do so primarily because they live in an earthquake prone area, which makes shipping containers the perfect choice as building blocks. They purchased the 40 foot container, which was once a refrigerated unit, for just $1800 from the Port of Oakland.
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Permaculture A Beginner's Guide

Permaculture A Beginner's Guide | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
What is 'Permaculture'? This graphic guide provides the answers, and more importantly encourages the reader to apply it's ethics and principles of sustainability and working with, rather than against, nature to their land (whether it's a windowbox or a 1000 hectare farm), their community or their life. Newly revised, updated and expanded edition.
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Seedbombing: Applying The Principles Of Permaculture To Finance - CounterCurrents.org

Seedbombing: Applying The Principles Of Permaculture To Finance - CounterCurrents.org | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Permaculture is a body of thought that attempts to build ecological dynamics into design. A permacultural designer entirely understands the idea of obtaining a yield from the earth by investing time and energy, but the key difference is that they attempt to do so without undermining ecological balance. The focus is on mutualistic integration with ecologies, acting in accordance with natural regenerative processes rather than parasitically exploiting them. So can we use permacultural principles to design financial instruments and institutions?
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Bringing Soil to Life - Permaculture Magazine

Bringing Soil to Life - Permaculture Magazine | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
High-input cropping is taking a heavy toll of Britain's soils. This means reduced crop yields and lower profits for the farmer. And for everyone else the result is degraded foods and reduced food security. But the remedy is now clear. Today's farming systems have been too concerned with chemistry and taken too little account of soil biology. Which is why the farmer sessions at the 2014 Oxford Real Farming Conference will concentrate on living soils – how to unlock their productive potential using biological systems.
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Vandana Shiva: Small is big. The future of food security lies in protecting and promoting small farmers.”

Vandana Shiva: Small is big. The future of food security lies in protecting and promoting small farmers.” | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
“The living economies of the small need to join hands with the living democracies of the small to create peace and harmony, abundance and well-being.” And please see Laura Bruno’s post on the European Commission’s war on heirloom seeds: European...
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Radical Mycology featured on Punk Rock Permaculture

Radical Mycology featured on Punk Rock Permaculture | Permaculture University | Scoop.it
Evan Shoepke at Punk Rock Permaculture recently did an interview with Peter from the Radical Mycology collective about the ways that working with the fungal kingdom can influence and inform the world.
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