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Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing

Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Researchers are wiring plants to harness their intelligence and use them as organic biosensors.

 

"Italian researchers are building a network of connected "cyborg" plants (plantborgs? cyplants? cyberflora?) to use as organic biosensors. The plants are embedded with a tiny electronic device to monitor things like pollution levels, overuse of chemicals, temperature, parasites, acid rain, and communicate the data through a wireless network back to the lab."


Via ddrrnt
Trimtab-in-Training 's insight:

"Those roots sprawling out through the ground and branches reaching up into the sky are plants' eyes and ears, constantly monitoring natural chemical and physical stimuli to survive—that intelligence is why plants have been able to adapt and evolve on Earth for so many millennia, Vitaletti explains. Plants give off an electrical signal when they interact with environmental stimuli, and now scientists want to analyze those signals to glean insights from the cybernetic flora."

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The Health Benefits of Medicinal Mushroom Extracts | Fungi Health | Medicinal Mushroom Extract | Reishi | Cordyceps | Maitake | Shiitake | Lions Mane | Agaricus Blazei Murill

The Health Benefits of Medicinal Mushroom Extracts | Fungi Health | Medicinal Mushroom Extract | Reishi | Cordyceps | Maitake | Shiitake | Lions Mane | Agaricus Blazei Murill | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Medicinal mushrooms offer many health benefits. Some of these health benefits our medicinal mushroom extracts are associated with are listed below. Research on medicinal mushrooms in western medicine is still new.
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Lectures Aren't Just Boring, They're Ineffective, Too, Study Finds

Lectures Aren't Just Boring, They're Ineffective, Too, Study Finds | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
"Active learning" boosts grades, reduces failure rates in undergraduate STEM classes, concludes major review

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Volkmar Langer's curator insight, May 15, 12:40 AM

Definitely a must read!

Julie Bourguignon's curator insight, May 15, 1:37 AM

A bold statement...

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, May 30, 1:33 AM

aulas expositivas nao sao apenas chatas, sao ineficientes para aprendizagem também...

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Documentary kickstarter for Inhabit: A Permaculture Perspective

Inhabit is a feature length documentary introducing permaculture. It presents a vast array of projects, concepts, and people, and it translates the diversity of permaculture into something that can be understood by an equally diverse audience.

 

Permaculture is a road map for the redesign of human systems. It calls for a culture that acts in harmony with the forces of nature and it says "let's design an agriculture that increases the quality of life for all beings, and let’s achieve the same through our social, economic, and political systems."

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Scientists create circuit board modeled on the human brain

Scientists create circuit board modeled on the human brain | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

(Phys.org) —Stanford scientists have developed faster, more energy-efficient microchips based on the human brain – 9,000 times faster and using significantly less power than a typical PC. This offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain. For instance, a chip as fast and efficient as the human brain could drive prosthetic limbs with the speed and complexity of our own actions.

Stanford scientists have developed a new circuit board modeled on the human brain, possibly opening up new frontiers in robotics and computing.

For all their sophistication, computers pale in comparison to the brain. The modest cortex of the mouse, for instance, operates 9,000 times faster than a personal computer simulation of its functions.

Not only is the PC slower, it takes 40,000 times more power to run, writes Kwabena Boahen, associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford, in an article for the Proceedings of the IEEE.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-04-scientists-circuit-board-human-brain.html#jCp


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The artificial leaf that could power the world using sunlight, water and some catalysts to split water

The artificial leaf that could power the world using sunlight, water and some catalysts to split water | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

As Daniel Nocera gazed down on one of his experiments in what has come to be known as the "holy grail" of energy research, his response was to shrug:

 

"Oh, that can't be right."

 

It was a glass of tap water with a thumb-sized strip of silicon floating in it. When he held the glass up to the light, the strip began to gently bubble.

 

It seemed to be splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen...


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, May 4, 8:10 AM

Simple and efficient - producing hydrogen and oxygen from water by use of light and catalysts.

They say electricity is cheap and no one wants the new technology, so Nocera is setting his sights on the developing world...

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Resources | PLEASED

Resources | PLEASED | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
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Plantoid - Home

Plantoid - Home | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Trimtab-in-Training 's insight:

"The plant roots as a model for Collective Adaptive Behaviour and as a source
of inspiration for
Soft Robotics

The plant root system morphologically adapts to the environment and explores it with a number of rich sensorized probes.

Plants represent an excellent paradigm in terms of energy efficiency, low speed, strong actuation, and low power consumption.

Plants show adaptively variable growth and development during their  lifetime."

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Cellulose nanocrystals possible 'green' wonder material

Cellulose nanocrystals possible 'green' wonder material | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
The same tiny cellulose crystals that give trees and plants their high strength, light weight and resilience, have now been shown to have the stiffness of steel.
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Upskilling for Post Growth Futures, Together | Post Growth Institute

Upskilling for Post Growth Futures, Together | Post Growth Institute | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

When I was seven, I was given an Apple Macintosh in the hope that Mavis Beacon would teach me how to touch type. It was an unreasonable expectation, for I was actually more interested in escaping to the fantasy lands of computer games such as Dungeons and Dragons, and Lode Runner. Yet, these games had a lasting, unexpected impact on my thirst for learning. In playing Dungeons and Dragons, I remember being particularly excited each time my archetypal characters would gain ‘experience points’ that enabled them to upgrade their abilities.

 


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Terence Mckenna - Culture is not your friend.


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The Asymptotic Leap's curator insight, November 15, 2013 4:07 PM
A brilliant insight by the brilliant Mckenna about that which enslaves everyone of us.
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Potential activity of aqueous extract of... [Int J Med Mushrooms. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Trimtab-in-Training 's insight:

" Macroscopically, those rats whose wounds were dressed with HEFB and those in the Intrasite gel-treated group healed earlier than those treated with sdH2O. Histological analysis of healed wounds dressed with HEFB showed less scar width at wound enclosure and the healed wound contained fewer macrophages and more collagen with angiogenesis, compared to wounds dressed with sdH2O. In conclusion, wounds dressed with HEFB significantly enhanced the acceleration of wound healing enclosure in rats."

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Free online learning venture to go live next week - Massey University

Free online learning venture to go live next week - Massey University | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Massey will offer expertise in three of its core disciplines of Agriculture, Emergency Management and Māori Studies when its first open online courses go live next week.
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Data Geeks Say War, Not Agriculture, Spawned Complex Societies

They had relatively simple social structures, which consisted of perhaps a few dozen people, all of whom knew each other, and they didn't engage in complex cooperative tasks. But eventually, complex societies evolved ...

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The Collective Intelligence Blog - Exploring new models of collaboration and network organization

The Collective Intelligence Blog - Exploring new models of collaboration and network organization | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Exploring new models of collaboration and network organization

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, May 21, 1:10 PM

Looks an interesting blog

luiy's curator insight, June 10, 10:41 AM

Nature can inspire us to explore emerging models of interaction that will help to better understand patterns of collective intelligence in human groups. Steven Johnson, in his book “Emerging Systems” (2001), masterfully demonstrates how that connection (called Biomimicry or biomimetics) is full of metaphors. The Web Ask Nature, the Biomimicry Institute, brings together hundreds of examples of such associations.

 

In a previous post I mentioned that one of the things I liked about the Collective Intelligence Conference held at MIT in April 2012 was to listen to Deborah Gordon (Stanford) and Ian Couzin (Princeton), two behavioral biologists, who focused on the study of the patterns of behavior of animals in their natural habitats. They are not “biologists” in its classical sense but work as multidisciplinary groups that are making increasing use of mathematics and computer science as well as tracking and geolocation devices to investigate the collective behavior of swarms or “Swarm Intelligence“, a branch of artificial intelligence based on the collective behavior of decentralized and self-organized systems. 

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New Phytol: Fungal associations in Horneophyton ligneri from the Rhynie Chert (c. 407 million year old) closely resemble those in extant lower land plants (2014)

New Phytol: Fungal associations in Horneophyton ligneri from the Rhynie Chert (c. 407 million year old) closely resemble those in extant lower land plants (2014) | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

Fungi (Eumycota) form close associations with plants, with which they have co-existed since the dawn of life on land, but their diversity in early terrestrial ecosystems is still poorly understood.We studied petrographic sections of exceptionally well-preserved petrified plants from the 407 million yr-old Rhynie Chert (Scotland, UK). For comparative purposes, we illustrate fungal associations in four extant lower land plants.We document two new endophytes in the plant Horneophyton lignieri: Palaeoglomus boullardii (sp. nov. Glomeromycota) colonizes parenchyma in a discontinuous zone of the outer cortex of the aerial axes, forming arbuscule-like structures, vesicles and spores; Palaeoendogone gwynne-vaughaniae (gen. nov., sp. nov. Mucoromycotina) colonizes parenchyma in the basal part of the plant, where it is present in intercellular spaces and as intracellular coils but absent from rhizoids.Critical comparisons between the newly discovered Horneophyton endophytes, fungi previously described from the Rhynie Chert and fungal colonization in extant lower land plants reveal several features characteristic of both Mucoromycotina and Glomeromycota. A reappraisal of fungal associations in early land plants indicates that they are more diverse than assumed hitherto, overturning the long-held paradigm that the early endophytes were exclusively Glomeromycota.


Via Christophe Jacquet, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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My Research in a Nutshell

My Research in a Nutshell | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

"The human species can be defined by its special ability to manipulate symbols. Each great augmentation in this ability has brought enormous economic, social, political, religious, epistemological, educational (and so on) changes.

I think that there has been only 4 of these big changes. The first one is related to the invention of writing, when symbols became permanent and reified. The second one corresponds to the invention of the alphabet, indian numerals and other small groups of symbols able to represent “almost everything” by combination. The third one is the invention of the printing press and the subsequent invention of electronic mass media. In this case, the symbols were reproduced and transmitted by industrial machines. We are currently at the beginning of a fourth big anthropological change, because the symbols can now be transformedby massively distributed automata in the digital realm. My main hypothesis is that we still did not have invented the symbolic systems and cultural institutions fitting the new algorithmic medium. "


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, April 15, 11:07 AM

Pierre Levy has been thinking deeply about augmented collective intelligence for a long time and has written extensively. In this blog post, he succinctly summarizes his research into what he calls "Information Economy MetaLanguage."

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Future smart phones could be printed on your clothes | KurzweilAI

Future smart phones could be printed on your clothes | KurzweilAI | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

Monash UniversityDepartment of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (ECSE) engineers have modeled the world’s first “spaser” (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) to be made completely out of carbon.

Spasers are analogous to lasers, but generate surface plasmons (coherent electron oscillations) instead of photons.

PhD student and lead researcher Chanaka Rupasinghe said the modeled spaser design using carbon would offer many advantages. “Other spasers designed to date are made of gold or silver nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots, while our device would be comprised of a graphene resonator and a carbon nanotube gain element,” he said.

These materials are more than 100 times stronger than steel, can conduct heat and electricity much better than copper, and can withstand high temperatures, he noted.


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Delivering the Internet from space to billions of people who don't have internet access

Delivering the Internet from space to billions of people who don't have internet access | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

If all goes according to plan, North Koreans will soon have free, uncensored Internet provided by satellites the size of toaster ovens. 

 

That’s part of a project called Outernet, which hopes to launch hundreds of tiny satellites—known as CubeSats—to provide Internet to every person on Earth. Forty percent of the world’s people currently don’t have access to the Web. In a little more than a year, Outernet plans to have a fleet of 24 satellites operational and testing to pave the way for a globe-spanning network.


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The Asymptotic Leap's curator insight, February 21, 7:56 AM

New "wiring" paths for the growing global brain

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Detection and Classification of Extracellular Action Potential Recordings | Research Groups, Michigan State University

Detection and Classification of Extracellular Action Potential Recordings | Research Groups, Michigan State University | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
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Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing

Welcoming plants to the Web of Thing | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Researchers are wiring plants to harness their intelligence and use them as organic biosensors.

 

"Italian researchers are building a network of connected "cyborg" plants (plantborgs? cyplants? cyberflora?) to use as organic biosensors. The plants are embedded with a tiny electronic device to monitor things like pollution levels, overuse of chemicals, temperature, parasites, acid rain, and communicate the data through a wireless network back to the lab."


Via ddrrnt
Trimtab-in-Training 's insight:

"Those roots sprawling out through the ground and branches reaching up into the sky are plants' eyes and ears, constantly monitoring natural chemical and physical stimuli to survive—that intelligence is why plants have been able to adapt and evolve on Earth for so many millennia, Vitaletti explains. Plants give off an electrical signal when they interact with environmental stimuli, and now scientists want to analyze those signals to glean insights from the cybernetic flora."

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A wiki platform for self moderated groups that work online

A wiki platform for self moderated groups that work online | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

"The VE wiki continuously monitors and measures how well structured are the groups that collaborate on its pages. If needed, it can also be used to maintain collaborative work within certain levels of equity and evenness. Thus the tool serves a double purpose. On the one hand, it can be used as a monitoring tool, for understanding how collaboration is structured. On the other, it can be employed for adjusting collaboration along particular parameters desired by the instructor or site administrator. The wiki is built around the MediaWiki platform, through which content can be edited by any user, including non-registered ones, all changes are permanently stored, and access to information that was edited or added is instantaneous. In addition, all pages come with “talk” areas, which allow discussions and interactions about the editing process. This makes it well adapted for collaborative work, especially of a textual nature."


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:50 AM

Wiki collaboration is one of the strongest forms of augmented collective intelligence, and as always, the technology requires intelligent use in order for emergent intelligence to manifest in any useful way. This tool enables groups and managers/facilitators of groups to see how contributions are made, who makes the most contributions, and to make these efforts visible to others. Based on research by Sorin Adam Mateir at Purdue, it can be adapted to collaborative learning or to collaborative production.

Inteligência coletiva's curator insight, December 23, 2013 2:39 PM

As  plataformas Wiki permitem desenvolver  trabalho colaborativo integrando  multiplos participantes pois permitem  ao professor/administrador ter a noção do contributo de cada participante,  promover discussões e eventos. São uma ferramenta eficaz tanto para utilizadores dos média sociais, comunidades de aprendizagem, como ao nível da Educação formal, presencial ou a distância.

É o exemplo duma ferramenta com multiplas funcionalidades,  que se coaduna com a promoção do processo de inteligência coletiva.

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The Real Humanities Crisis-For those with humanistic and artistic life interests, our economic system has almost nothing to offer

For those with humanistic and artistic life interests, our economic system has almost nothing to offer

-

“Crisis” and “decline” are the words of the day in discussions of the humanities. A primary stimulus for the concern is a startling factoid: only 8 percent of undergraduates major in humanities. But this figure is misleading. It does not include majors in closely related fields such as history, journalism and some of the social sciences. Nor does it take account of the many required and elective humanities courses students take outside their majors. Most important, the 8 percent includes only those with a serious academic interest in literature, music and art, not those devoted to producing the artistic works that humanists study..


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Yamabushitake - Scientific Review on Usage, Dosage, Side Effects

Yamabushitake - Scientific Review on Usage, Dosage, Side Effects | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
Yamabushitake, known as the Lion's Mane Mushroom, is a dietary mushroom that can be a supplement. It appears to be a promising cognitive enhancer and immunomodulator (thought to stimulate or suppress inflammation depending on context).
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Nature: Symbiosis leads to diversity (2013)

Nature: Symbiosis leads to diversity (2013) | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v494/n7436/full/494151c.html

 

Species interactions such as competition and predation spur on diversification — as can symbiotic relationships, a study of plant-invading insects has found.

 

Many species of a family of insects known as gall midges (Cecidomyiidae) rely on fungi to help them break down plant tissues; in return, the female gall midges deposit the fungal spores along with their eggs when they move from plant to plant. In a survey of the literature, Jeffrey Joy at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, found that gall midges that are associated with fungi tend to use a wider variety of host plants (pictured) compared with those with no association. Moreover, his analysis of gall-midge lineages revealed that symbiotic insect species are more than 17 times as diverse as non-symbiotic ones.

 

Forming a relationship with plant-digesting fungi could allow for greater evolutionary diversity in other insect species by providing them with a greater number of potential hosts, Joy suggests.

 

Proc. R. Soc. B http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.2820


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A radical new holistic view of health based on cooperation and disease based on competition | KurzweilAI

A radical new holistic view of health based on cooperation and disease based on competition | KurzweilAI | Perma-Tech Inspirations | Scoop.it
A cytoscape analysis of all candidate genes identified at least twice and for which network information was available shows that many of the candidate genes

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, September 22, 2013 6:49 AM

This is biology yet highly relevant to the Global Brain.