Period 8: Globalization
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China's Recovery Falters as Manufacturing Growth Cools - Bloomberg

China's Recovery Falters as Manufacturing Growth Cools - Bloomberg | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Bloomberg
China's Recovery Falters as Manufacturing Growth Cools
Bloomberg
China's manufacturing is expanding at a slower pace this month on weakness in global and domestic demand, fueling concern that the world's second-biggest economy is faltering.

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Olivia Brooks's comment, May 2, 2013 1:53 PM
It's not good that China's stock market is slowing down because it it will effect the rest of the world because we won't get all the products we need
Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:29 PM
China has real problems with their working age population declining and their demand for food and good air is inclining. It was a big shock to me that manufacturing is actually slowing down.
zach Wilz's comment, May 6, 2013 1:07 PM
Its bad for China that there stock market is slowing down. But it surprises me that there manufactoring is slowing down also. China makes most of the stuff that comes to America so im wondering if this will affect us.
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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:16 PM

I feel as though marriage can be complicated in China due to the one child policy. The amount of males outweigh the females. Therefore, there will not be as many marriages because there are not enough females to go around. Grooms have to put out so much for their brides. For example, in this article, her groom is unable to even get in the room to see her unless he puts up a chunk of money first. This is a typical ordeal for Chinese weddings. People describe it as a negotiation process. He must do whatever is told of him before seeking her hand in marriage. The "bride price" is when the groom gives the brides family a fair amount of money. A typical amount for an ordinary family to give is around $10,000. This is so much to get married and on top of all this, gender roles are typically unbalanced. In order to get married in China, you best make sure your a man ready to fulfill every request of your bride.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 5:53 PM

I always heard that men were more desirable in China because they are the ones that carry out the family name and provide for the family. Women, however, are seen as much weaker and are treated as lesser. For the newly wed couple in the article, they hope to have a baby girl because it is much cheaper when she gets married. I never thought of it this way but having a girl would be much cheaper as the parents would not have to pay the "bride price" or for the apartment in which their daughter will be living in. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:48 AM

Unit 3

Culture

Cultural Practices

Cultural practuces in China are changing, but old customs are staying the dame. An old tradition is still being help up, called the "bride price.;This is a price that men must pay in order to marry. In China the male to female ratio is vey off, with 117 men to every 100 women.

Insight

Women are still being given a price on their head. It's a little different than it is in America.The culture behind the bride price is still going on in China and with China's ways of remembering traditions. China is a very traditional place with cultures following old traditions. The One Child policy, resulting in many males compared to females, and the strong traditions in China all result in why their customs stay for so long. 

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China and the internet

China and the internet | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

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Dustin Hogan's comment, May 2, 2013 1:53 PM
China has profited from the internet while finding ways to control it. The Chinese gov't controls the info that people can access
Tanner Stumm's comment, May 2, 2013 4:31 PM
China has more and more people on the internet, but people are being blocked from many large websites. This could effect how well people are informed in China.
Annika Della Vedova's comment, May 3, 2013 2:51 PM
China's government has put up the "great firewall" and blocked many Outside websites such as Facebook and YouTube. By blocking these websites they are potentially blocking ways from their people to be informed.
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HP cracks down on forced labor from temps, students in China

HP cracks down on forced labor from temps, students in China | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

HP has given direction to its Chinese suppliers that the use of temporary and student workers should be limited and should not be forced.


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Riley McCoy's comment, May 3, 2013 11:12 AM
Due to another failed plan of action by the chinese they are left with an aging population, smaller workforce, and not enough children or young people to care for there elderly parents. They should not have to resort to going to high school students and other underage workers to have to get there products mass produced.
zach Wilz's comment, May 3, 2013 2:53 PM
I dont think its fair that these kids are being overworked. I think that HP is doing the right thing by cracking down on these young kids working.
Zach Deaton's comment, May 6, 2013 11:04 AM
This could be a good thing if it's scaled back and kids are given jobs related to their study. It should be a optional "course."
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End Of Outsourcing To China?

End Of Outsourcing To China? | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
CNBC: Walk onto the shop floor at Prince Industries in Shanghai, China and it looks like most other manufacturing plants in this country. (U.S.

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Zach Deaton's comment, May 6, 2013 11:29 AM
Where as some will say this will bring jobs back to the US, I believe that it will move to other countries where it is cheaper. Also, one must see that a rise in workers' rights in China will make our goods more expensive here.
zach Wilz's comment, May 6, 2013 1:01 PM
I think that companies will start leaving China as costs keep rising. I tyhink though that they will move to countries like veitnam though where there is still cheap labor.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:41 PM
china's prices will drive companies away, but I dont think this will create more jobs for america, but ccreate more outsourcing to cheaper countries
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China profile

China profile | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

China is simply to important to ignore and this profile is a good primer for students unfamiliar with the East Asian country to get caught up to speed. 


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Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:23 PM
China has a huge population but is has a horrible life style. It
Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:25 PM
China has a huge population but it has a horrible life style. It's really bad when people have to protest for human rights. Even though their economy has boosted their pollution problems are unexceptable.
Joel Roberts's comment, May 3, 2013 2:37 PM
China's huge population growth isn't necessarily such a good thing because most of the new population is males because parents want males so they can have more workers after they get married but its harder to get married because there is less and less girls in China's population.
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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.

 

Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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Running Track Acts As Green Roof For China School - EarthTechling

Running Track Acts As Green Roof For China School - EarthTechling | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Running Track Acts As Green Roof For China School EarthTechling While searching for room for a playground and for ways to make the project more sustainable, the designers at LYCS Architecture have proposed a combined playground, running track and...

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Brad Hrubes's comment, May 3, 2013 6:53 PM
Having a green roof helps kids not be exposed to China's air pollution. The exercise area added 32,000 sq. ft of space for students. It also lowers electricity costs because the windows let in natural light.
Connor Robson's comment, May 6, 2013 9:56 AM
This green roof idea is a very safe for the kids and the economy. The roof track and the courtyard keep the kids safe from the city traffic and the large windows allow natrual light from the courtyard. I think you will continue to see this in other cities.
Lindsey Settle's comment, May 7, 2013 10:23 PM
This is such an interesting and innovative idea! It's tackling pollution, environmental, use of space, and modern issues. I think this will prove to be a new successful way of thinking that countries around the world could benefit from.
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China's urbanization drive leaves migrant workers out in the cold

China's urbanization drive leaves migrant workers out in the cold | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
BEIJING/SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Twenty minutes' drive from Shanghai's glitzy financial district, dozens of migrant workers are preparing to abandon homes in old shipping containers, as one of the more unusual...

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Riley Trent's comment, May 2, 2013 4:20 PM
This story is very shocking from a numbers standpoint. From an ethics standpoint, the ageless split between rich and poor has been publicly exposed in China. Seeing this and reading it kind of makes me look at our own streets for a while.
shyla clark's comment, May 2, 2013 4:21 PM
migrant workers should have a better place to live. If they lived closer to there jobs it would give them more oppertunities to be better at there jobs.
Tanner Stumm's comment, May 3, 2013 4:31 PM
China needs to expand and make room for urban residents, as well as upgrade infrastructure and housing. This creates a problem for migrant workers who cannot afford the new housing.
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Can China keep its workers happy?

Protests in China, particularly among migrant workers, are on the rise with an estimated 30,000 protests in the past year - but what is the Chinese government doing to keep its workers happy, and its economy ticking over?

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Taylor Brown's comment, May 3, 2013 2:55 PM
The migrant workers should be able to live in the city if they want to. If anyone has a problem with it they should just move. They need to treat all of their workers the same no matter where they come from. There has even begun to be rioting because they want higher pay, and the businesses need to keep their workers under control.
Emmy Farrell's comment, May 3, 2013 4:32 PM
there has been to many riots about better pay, but they are not doing any thing about it
Iryl Bacdayan's comment, May 5, 2013 6:28 PM
I think that the workers should be able to change their household registration so that they can send their kids to local schools. If they want to change it they have to meet a ton of requirements, which could be very hard to meet. I also think that it's not very fair how they are denied of the rights that city dwellers have.
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Apple: Poor working conditions inside the Chinese factories making iPads

Apple: Poor working conditions inside the Chinese factories making iPads | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Staff and safety experts have spoken out about the conditions in Chinese factories, with banners in one giving a warning of: 'Work hard on the job today or work hard to find a job tomorrow'.

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Taylor Brown's comment, May 3, 2013 2:45 PM
The workers at Foxconn are not treated ass well as they should be. Some are forced to stand during 24 hour long shifts, and they have to share rooms with many other workers. They don't get paid nearly enough for the hard work they do. Workers have even been injured and they don't even do anything about it besides fire them. They need to treat their workers with more care.
Claudia Bresson's comment, May 3, 2013 2:47 PM
Apple is inconsiderate of their workers. Almost 140 workers were injured 2 years ago cleaning iPhone screen with a poisonous chemical. Even though workers have many benefits of working at Apple, they also have poor working conditions.
Savanna Henning's comment, May 5, 2013 1:26 PM
The treatment of many Apple workers in China is often overlooked by Apple.All they want is to be able to make more of their products faster and cheaper. Workers are often forced to work long hours, live in crowded dormitories, and are explosed to dangerous chemicals. However, the workers often have worse living conditions where they came from and need the job so they tolerate the conditions.
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Pollution Is Radically Changing Childhood in China’s Cities

Pollution Is Radically Changing Childhood in China’s Cities | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
High levels of deadly pollutants in Beijing and other cities have led parents to alter their children’s day-to-day activities drastically, and some plan to leave the country.

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Madi Day's comment, May 3, 2013 1:49 PM
China's air pollution is getting worse and worse. Many parents are not allowing their children to go outside because it is so bad. Also the pollution is causing respitory problems in many people.
Emmy Farrell's comment, May 3, 2013 4:01 PM
pollution is is a serious problem in china, there are parents that are moving away from china, and they arent letting there kids go outside
Gabriel Pavlik's comment, May 3, 2013 4:15 PM
I never knew that china's pollution problem was this bad. that is not thier only problem though, if many rich people leave, they will have much of the wealth in china disappear.
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China Took the Clean Energy Lead in 2012, and Will Likely Stay There

China Took the Clean Energy Lead in 2012, and Will Likely Stay There | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

China's environmental woes—whether it be smog, toxic metal dumps, reef collapse, tiger farms, and so on—are fairly well known. But China, in its race to develop the infrastructure it needs, is also a powerhouse when it comes to clean energy. And according to a new study from Pew Charitable Trusts, China was the world leader in clean energy investment in 2012. The US, meanwhile, saw its grip loosen on many of the clean energy technologies it developed.

 

 


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jean lievens's comment, May 2, 2013 4:44 PM
that's true
Dustin Hogan's comment, May 3, 2013 1:58 PM
The cost of manufacturing in china is going up and rising quickly and that is making china have more health concern. by 2015 it is estimated that the cost of manufacturing in china will be equal to the cost of manufacturing in the U.S
Tyler Ashton's comment, May 5, 2013 1:21 PM
Although China is the worlds largest producer of carbon dioxide, China was the worlds largest leader in clean energy investment in 2012. In 2011 the high in clean energy investment totaled 302 billion dollars, and in 2012 it totaled 269 billion dollars, Even though there was a decrease that is still fairly high.
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How China Is Making Its Own Daily Temps Go Up

How China Is Making Its Own Daily Temps Go Up | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — China, the world's largest producer of carbon dioxide, is directly feeling the man-made heat of global warming, scientists conclude in the first study to link the burning of fossil fuels to one country's rise in its daily...

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Rainier Manuel's comment, May 3, 2013 3:19 PM
I can't imagine the weather in China especially for a overpopulated country. China has the largest Carbon Dioxide producer bigger than the US and India. Their government need to look at this and fix it.
Gabriel Pavlik's comment, May 3, 2013 4:25 PM
China has a problem with their thermostat and so I don't want to go their.
Zach Deaton's comment, May 6, 2013 11:10 AM
There's obviously a trade-off here. Economic growth for overpopulation and large carbon emissions. This pollution can, will, and is creating big problems. I wouldn't ever want to move here.
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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted. 

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Chinese caught in disposable tableware panic - China.org.cn

Chinese caught in disposable tableware panic - China.org.cn | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it

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Annika Della Vedova's comment, May 4, 2013 4:16 PM
the chopsticks turned the water yellow because of excessive amounts of sulfur left in them. Companies used the sulfur to whiten the chopsticks and used to much. Because excessive amounts of sulfur dioxide over extended periods of time can cause damage to the human body, many people where upset.
Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 3:17 PM
The pollution created by these disposable tableware products are raising awareness of the harmful toxins to the people in China. Many citizens want more restrictions on the factories making these products to help the environment and society's overall health. The picture of the yellow water was quite startling because you wouldn't expect that a few chopsticks could turn plain water that color in only a few minutes.
Connor Robson's comment, May 6, 2013 9:55 AM
I think that the water turning yellow is a natural cause of sulfur but is it because of to much sulfur? If it is because of to much sulfur, is the sulfur causing harm to the people using them? China needs to put an investigation on to make sure its people are not being harmed due to chopsticks.
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Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Yang Lan, a journalist and entrepreneur who's been called "the Oprah of China," offers insight into the next generation of young Chinese citizens -- urban, connected (via microblogs) and alert to injustice.


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Trey Rouse's comment, May 2, 2013 1:02 PM
I thought that this was insanely intriguing, informative and entertaining. I mean she made the most interesting and correct points in how China has changed and showed that they aren't all tight and restricting as they were and I actually thought to myself while watching only the first 5 minutes, "Well if her generation fought for all of this then what is the current one doing?" and to that she answered, "Well they don't seem to be doing much." and that is so true. This I would definitely agree with. What are they doing? Who knows what.
Braden Oldham's comment, May 2, 2013 9:48 PM
China is becoming a less tight and more freedom country. Also it made me wonder how does our generation change our country.
Aj highsmith's comment, May 3, 2013 1:55 PM
It made think that maye the change in China might change the world or how people look at china and what they think of it.
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China's 'left behind' children

China's 'left behind' children | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Many of China's migrant workers have young children back in their villages and do not see them for months or even years on end.

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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 3:24 PM
Many children in China live in the villages while their parents work in the big cities and send home money for them. These children don
Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 3:25 PM
These children don't see their parents for months, even years sometimes and feel very sad. I know that I would be devastated if my parents just left me behind without ever coming to visit.
Connor Robson's comment, May 6, 2013 10:03 AM
All these children not being able to see their parents is very sad. This girl and most of her classmates dont see their parents due to their parents leaving their villages to go and work in a city to make more money.
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Shanghai Migrant Workers Photographs

Shanghai Migrant Workers Photographs | Period 8: Globalization | Scoop.it
Website of the french photographer Alain Delorme...

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Gabriel Pavlik's comment, May 1, 2013 4:23 PM
in totem # 10 there is one man carrying fabric and another man carrying something else in the back ground, and the fact that multiple people are carrying these huge loads just amazes me
Emmy Farrell's comment, May 1, 2013 4:23 PM
in totem #13 i think it is interesting that he has a cage on it, and that is how he is carrying these bottles. there is also a guy who looks like he is staring in amazment at the cage, surprised about that he can carry them all.
seth marshall's comment, May 2, 2013 12:28 PM
it looks pretty hard including that there is no motor most of it if foot powered and i would find it hard to place my balance on it properly