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Theme 4: People & Development
Reliable links for Focus Units: Feeding the world's people & the geography of disease
Curated by nzgeogeek
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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Theme 4: People & Development | Scoop.it

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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:18 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | Theme 4: People & Development | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   


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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists

Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists | Theme 4: People & Development | Scoop.it
Water scarcity's effect on food production means radical steps will be needed to feed population expected to reach 9bn by 2050...

 

This article represents a good example of neo-Malthusian ideas concerning population growth and food production.  The recent drought and subsequent food shortage/spike in global food prices has renewed interest in these ideas.


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Charles M's comment, August 27, 2012 11:00 AM
Being a vegetarian is a lifestyle that not many people wish to embrace. People are looked down upon for being a vegetarian. In reality, as a vegetarian the food is incredible and the feeling after you eat food is drastic compared to a meat eater. As a vegetarian you think more abou what you are putting into your mouth, and eventually body.
Lim Jun Heng's curator insight, February 1, 2013 7:46 AM

From this article I can tell that the lack of water is getting more and more out of hand, affecting our food supply. It will not be a surprise for humans to become vegetarians as the lack of meat is apparent. Having a vegetarian diet is the only way for us human to have enough water for our own consumption. , I think it is not that bad to be a vegetarian, after all vegetarian leads a healthier lifestyle compared to people who always eat meat. Vegetables are good for our health after all. This makes me wonder, considering our lack of water and food supply, what will happen if people refuse to co-operate? And continues to waste resources, will we really be the cause of our own extinction? 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:20 AM

Neo-Malthusian thought......