People and Development
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People and Development
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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | People and Development | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | People and Development | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | People and Development | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:39 PM

No one should have to be burdened with returning to a failed state, which is exactly what Somali is. As the main male figure in this clip mentioned, the conditions of the failed state he left 20 years ago has only gotten worse. It would make little sense for him or his family to return because there is no economic opportunity and no government stability. At least in Kenya, this family now has "a modest living." If this family were to return, the family would struggle to survive. If I were in their shoes, I would feel the same way. A decent standard of living is just as important as a safe community. For even though their is less violence to instantly kill people, starvation and disappear from lack of financial and governmental support would eventually prematurely kill people. So without either, I wouldn't return. Thus, I agree that the decision of a refugee to return should be left up to them as the reparation program between Kenya and Somali are currently doing.

 

Leaving ones country behind is still a tough choice. Abandoning the area increases "brain drain" and the man power to make the situation better. During our class on the Caribbean, it was mentioned that the government of countries facing these problems will try to attract their population back through incentives. In a failed state, the government isn't strong enough to incentivize people to come back. So, who does take care of this region? Someone with a great sense of duty to their country more than likely. For instance, Nelson Mandela was extremely smart and could easily have turned his back on the harsh conditions facing his country. Yet, he didn't and eventually become the leader needed to improve the standard of living in South Africa. Now I realize this was never a failed state, but their were still plenty of problems within the area that made staying harder that it should have been for the citizen of a country. So ultimately, the people who will have the greatest impact are those who have the sense of duty to their country. This isn't something every refugee will feel and as mentioned earlier, I can't blame them. It takes a rare selflessness and strong sense of courage that few people have.  For those that do though, their country will be indebted to them forever. 

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | People and Development | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:09 AM

Its taken very dedicated advocates, scientists, doctors, and nurses to turn the AIDs epidemic around.  When the AIDs epidemic emerged there was a lot of speculation about how you could contract the disease.  Again through science people became educated.  This is a monumental fete that the AIDs virus is on a downward trajectory.  Thank goodness for advances in science and international co-operation.  

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:07 AM

Over the last quarter century, the medical technology has ever so changed. Simple tests and modernized medications can help slow the progress of the HIV infection. The tests can tell if someone has advanced AIDS or early stages of the HIV virus itself. However, over the last year and a half, the epidemic has been placed on the back burner with the Ebola epidemic that has and still occurring. The fact that Ebola spread as rapidly as it did, shows that any virus or disease can spread extremely quick if someone comes in contact with bodily fluids of another human and can be contracted pretty quickly.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:10 PM

this is a media issue all over the world. focusing on one part of a story and not revealing the rest. people can focus on how bad things are or they can focus on the advancements and how much better things are than how they were and how they continue to get better, especially in regards to medical care in africa. their level of care is still just awful but is obviously steadily improving. especially in south africa.

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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Africa Next

Africa Next | People and Development | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
Aliah Therese's curator insight, April 3, 9:48 AM
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Its not just artists that reach struggle with certain issues.