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HUNGER: what you need to know.

Visit http://www.endinghunger.org to eradicate world hunger for good. People who are chronically hungry are undernourished. They don't eat enough to get the ...
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People and Development
Information, links and resources that will be useful for Theme 4
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America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | People and Development | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.
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How societies can grow old better

How societies can grow old better | People and Development | Scoop.it
There's an irony behind the latest efforts to extend human life: It's no picnic to be an old person in a youth-oriented society. Older people can become isolated, lacking meaningful work and low on funds. In this intriguing talk, Jared Diamond looks at how many different societies treat their elders -- some better, some worse -- and suggests we all take advantage of experience.
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This Video Will Change The Way You Look At Privilege

This Video Will Change The Way You Look At Privilege | People and Development | Scoop.it
What is privilege? Is there any way to describe it?

In a recent video posted by Buzzfeed, several people are asked a series of questions and then told to either step forward or backward if the ques
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Mobile school in Kenya brings education and hope to girls on the move

Mobile school in Kenya brings education and hope to girls on the move | People and Development | Scoop.it
In Marsabit County, located in a part of northern Kenya that suffers from extremes in weather as well as sporadic attacks from Islamist militant group Al Shabaab, less than 15% of girls over the age of 6 have ever attended school, and the drop-out rate rises steeply as soon as the girls are old ...
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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | People and Development | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
geographynerd's insight:

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, August 3, 2:10 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon
geographynerd's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Which country does the most good for the world?

Which country does the most good for the world? | People and Development | Scoop.it
It's an unexpected side effect of globalization: problems that once would have stayed local—say, a bank lending out too much money—now have consequences worldwide. But still, countries operate independently, as if alone on the planet. Policy advisor Simon Anholt has dreamed up an unusual scale to get governments thinking outwardly: The Good Country Index. In a riveting and funny talk, he answers the question, "Which country does the most good?" The answer may surprise you (especially if you live in the US or China).
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'Food deserts' leave residents in grocery dead zones, with takeaway as easy option

'Food deserts' leave residents in grocery dead zones, with takeaway as easy option | People and Development | Scoop.it
Public health experts begin mapping Australia's so-called food deserts and find the consequences for the people who live in them are extremely serious.
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The Flight of Refugees Around the Globe

The Flight of Refugees Around the Globe | People and Development | Scoop.it
Mapping the migration of millions of people displaced around the world because of violence. Last year alone, about 14 million fled, according to the United Nations.
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World Population by Income

World Population by Income | People and Development | Scoop.it
Where in the world does the global middle class live, and where are their numbers growing the most?
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Tales of the unexpected

Tales of the unexpected | People and Development | Scoop.it
WEIJIA is a typical Chinese seven-year-old. He loves riding his bike and anything to do with cars; he is a badminton fanatic and has lessons twice a week. In a few...
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Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing

Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing | People and Development | Scoop.it
Visualised in graphs I am presenting the long-term data on how we are changing our world. This is the Empirical View on How We Are Making Our World a Better Place. Topic by topic I cover the decline of violence and the increase of tolerance and political rights. Improving living standards, health and well-being; population changes and associated success in preserving our environment. Increasing knowledge about our word and spreading education.
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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | People and Development | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 9, 10:10 PM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations

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America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | People and Development | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.

 

99% of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in the developing world. The good news is that in most countries the rate of maternal mortality has been going down. The bad news is that in eight countries the rate is going up. The shocking news is that the United States is among them. It is the only industrialized country to have that dubious distinction. The rate has in fact been doubling in recent years.

 

Tag: mortality, development, gender, statistics, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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4 TED Talks on the importance of educating girls

4 TED Talks on the importance of educating girls | People and Development | Scoop.it
In far too many countries around the world, an education is not a given for girls. These moving talks are from those facing great risk to change that.
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Global population forecasts

Global population forecasts | People and Development | Scoop.it
NEW population forecasts from the United Nations point to a new world order in 2050. The number of people will grow from 7.3 billion to 9.7 billion in 2050, 100m...
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A 50-cent microscope that folds like origami

A 50-cent microscope that folds like origami | People and Development | Scoop.it
Perhaps you’ve punched out a paper doll or folded an origami swan? TED Fellow Manu Prakash and his team have created a microscope made of paper that's just as easy to fold and use. A sparkling demo that shows how this invention could revolutionize healthcare in developing countries … and turn almost anything into a fun, hands-on science experiment.
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In South Africa childhood hunger and obesity live side by side

In South Africa childhood hunger and obesity live side by side | People and Development | Scoop.it
There are two extremes of malnutrition at play among South Africa's youth - both under nutrition and over nutrition.
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Stats that reshape your world-view

With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, statistics guru Hans Rosling uses an amazing new presentation tool, Gapminder, to present data that debunks several myths about world development. Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden's Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a nonprofit that brings vital global data to life.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 3:01 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

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World Population by Income

World Population by Income | People and Development | Scoop.it
Where in the world does the global middle class live, and where are their numbers growing the most?
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Australia-Population-Map-Generational-Profile-2015_Infographic_McCrindle.pdf

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The Flight of Refugees Around the Globe

The Flight of Refugees Around the Globe | People and Development | Scoop.it
Mapping the migration of millions of people displaced around the world because of violence. Last year alone, about 14 million fled, according to the United Nations.
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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon
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Henk Trimp's curator insight, June 12, 6:26 AM

Questionable, but intriguing contribution to an ever continuing discussion...

Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 5:24 AM
I'm not sure if I believe everything this video stated, however I think it is a good topic to analyze. I think it would be interesting to see how the rich countries became rich. They can't just have started on top. I also believe the rich countries abuse the poor countries because we can get goods/minerals/just about anything for a small price and then sell it in the rich country for much more.
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.