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In Africa, we must do the most good with each pound spent on Aids-HIV

In Africa, we must do the most good with each pound spent on Aids-HIV | People and Development | Scoop.it

Bjorn Lomborg: With donor money to fight HIV and Aids falling, spending in sub-Saharan Africa must be targeted to get the best results...


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Social Progress Index

Social Progress Index | People and Development | Scoop.it
The Social Progress Imperative creates a shared language and common goals to align different organizations and achieve greater social impact.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 3:03 PM

I think we all know that we shouldn't judge a country just by it's GDP.  Economic development might be correlated with development and social progress, but the outliers are so telling.  In this TED talk, we learn about a new metric designed to measure how well a society provides opportunities for communal and individual success.  Having lived in Costa Rica for two years, I'm not surprised to find that Costa Rica does much better on this index than it would if we were to use GDP or HDI as a way to measure social progress and quality of life. For a more detailed look at the United States, see Geographies of Opportunity: Ranking well-being by Congressional Districts.        


Questions to Ponder: How is the Social Progress Index similar to and different from the Human Development Index?  What assumptions are built into the system? 


Tags: development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica, mapping.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:45 PM

Interactive map showing different categories of social progress

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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | People and Development | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 9, 10:10 PM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations

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Which is the poorest city in the world?

Which is the poorest city in the world? | People and Development | Scoop.it
Ranking hardship is not a simple, or happy, task – but as the world urbanises, city poverty becomes ever more important. Here are the places that struggle most
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'World grappling with malnutrition'

'World grappling with malnutrition' | People and Development | Scoop.it
Every nation on the planet, except China, is crossing a "malnutrition red line", suffering from too little or too much nutrition, a report warns.
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Ebola: how to prevent a lethal legacy for food security

Ebola: how to prevent a lethal legacy for food security | People and Development | Scoop.it
The World Food Programme warns that 1.4 million people could become malnourished because of Ebola. We must act quickly to avoid catastrophe
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Orphanage trips by Aussie schools are doing more harm than good

Orphanage trips by Aussie schools are doing more harm than good | People and Development | Scoop.it
Australian private schools are increasingly taking their senior students to volunteer in orphanages, but they're doing more harm than good.
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Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future

Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future | People and Development | Scoop.it

Neglecting the health of Africa's soil will lock the continent into a cycle of food insecurity for generations to come, a report warns.


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Green agriculture: A food revolution

Green agriculture: A food revolution | People and Development | Scoop.it
Allianz Knowledge on Environment: Agriculture’s Green Revolution rescued millions from starvation in the 20th century but failed to eradicate hunger. With global food demand set to grow by 50 percent by 2030, the new century needs a new agricultural revolution.

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Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive

Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive | People and Development | Scoop.it
The MDGs expire this year and the SDGs begin. But what are the SDGs all about?

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | People and Development | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:52 PM

I. International Database for the US Census Bureau created graphs representing population estimates broken down by country, age, and year. These graphs show the population shifts over 35 years of major countries. 

 

II. Developed nations show a column shape with a pointed top. Developed nations have equal amounts of males and females, and have a higher population of 30-50 year olds. With a high number of middle aged people and a low number of elderly people, developed nations remain stable due to a stable birth rate and death rate. Developing countries have a pyramid shaped population, with many young people and few 50-100 years olds. This leads to a weak economy as their is high unemployment. Developing countries also have overall higher populations, which leads to poverty as their is a lack of resources. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:31 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION
This article depicts various population pyramids in developing, as well as developed countries. These pyramids show trends from the past, as well as predictions for the future (2050). With population pyramids, it is easy to understand how populations shift, as well as observe different trends on populations. I really like studying the information given to us by population pyramids, so this article is very important to me. This whole thing relates to historical trends and projections for the future. 

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | People and Development | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state

 

Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.

 

Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:52 PM

Summary: This article basically confirms the DTM. It talks about how because of Italy's wealth there population may cease to exist in the far future.

 

Insight: This article not only has a lot to do with the DTM, but it also analyzes several factors affecting population.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 8:40 PM

Unit 2: 

Italy continues to round off half a century of declines in births. Recent statistics show that the countries birth rates are at the lowest rate they have been since the formation of the modern Italian state. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:53 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION

This article is very informative on the current situation in Italy. Fewer babies were born in 2014 than in any other year since 1861, and this is said to be connected to the country's "sluggish economy". Immigration, a factor that previously contributed to the birth rate in Italy, has been at its lowest in five years. People in Italy are dying, and there are not enough births to balance out the country. As a result, the country is so called "dying". The government of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is trying very hard boost the economy by reforming the labour market and trying to convince young adults to stay in Italy rather than working abroad. This whole conflict in Italy involves the promotion of population growth in a country, because the country is dying and needs a more stable population.

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▶ How to Feed the World? - YouTube


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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 3:38 AM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world

CD - The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably feed the projected future population to achieve food security for Australia and the world.


Many concepts here useful also for  Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | People and Development | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."


Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, April 13, 10:16 AM

In order to replenish the population of a country, there must be 2 kids born to each family, on average, not factoring in immigration.  In many developed countries, particularly in Europe, the average numbers of kids being born are lower.  This can actually have negative consequences, such as high dependency ratios, loss of people to work certain jobs, economic stagnation.  Also, many LDCs who depend on the markets of MDCs will not have as many people to sell their goods to!  Here's some of the latest strategies for promoting families to make babies in these countries. 

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | People and Development | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:29 AM

I think this article is very interesting because it is telling us to answer the questions that we always asked ourselves but never answered such as: "Where is our milk from?" This talks about world hunger, the food waste 'scandal' and organic farming. I believe we should all support famers markets and local natural farming. We should stop wasting so much food and only place on our plate how much we are going to eat. We should start thinking about the problem of world hunger and how are we going to solve it.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

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This is where Australia's imported food comes from

This is where Australia's imported food comes from | People and Development | Scoop.it
See where Australia imports food from with this interactive graphic
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The size of it

The size of it | People and Development | Scoop.it
How the world's population has changedTHE world in 1950 looked very different from how it does now. Europe was home to 22% of the world's 2.5 billion people....
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What school lunches look like around the world

What school lunches look like around the world | People and Development | Scoop.it
Schoolchildren in Spain, Ukraine, Greece, South Korea, Brazil, France, Finland and Italy eat a remarkable array of fresh foods for lunch, unlike the UK and US trays, which are full of processed items.
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon, Adam Cooke
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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 2014 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | People and Development | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


Via Seth Dixon
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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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BBC Health Care Future of Food Part 3 Food in Cuba Discovery 2013 - YouTube

Documentary 2014, bbc documentary,bbc,national geographic,documentary,national geographic documentary,Structure,documentaries, documentary films, documentari...

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BBC Future of Food - Part 2: Senegal - YouTube

Future of Food - Part 2: Senegal George heads out to India to discover how a changing diet in the developing world is putting pressure on the world's limited...

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6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography

6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography | People and Development | Scoop.it
Ever wonder where your food comes from? Feast your eyes on these amazing agriculture maps and learn what the future of agriculture holds.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 18, 12:50 AM

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world