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US corn ethanol cost poor nations $6.6 bln - study - AlertNet

US corn ethanol cost poor nations $6.6 bln - study - AlertNet | People and Development | Scoop.it
Use of corn for biofuel is directly raising food prices for the world’s poorest, research shows..

 

Great resource for students looking at biofuels. What is the cost of ethanol production on poorer countries? 

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Eat: The Story of Food

Eat: The Story of Food | People and Development | Scoop.it
Take a tasty journey through history to discover how food shaped our world in Nat Geo’s Eat: The Story of Food.
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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | People and Development | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Hipsters At Whole Foods May Be Hurting A Lot More People Than They Realize

Hipsters At Whole Foods May Be Hurting A Lot More People Than They Realize | People and Development | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
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China's One Child Policy: Infographic

China's One Child Policy: Infographic | People and Development | Scoop.it

Via Adam Cooke
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Adam Cooke's curator insight, October 15, 4:56 AM

Infographic on China's One Child Policy and its implementation. #geographyteacher

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 2, 11:15 AM

unit 2

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2:48 PM

In population geography, carrying capacity is a serious issue when talking about an areas ability to provide food for the population. In the Sahel region, a 30% increase in population coupled with almost no growth in food production causes major concerns. We can see how population geography and resources can go hand in hand. If an area is unable to feed a growing population, then population growth will lead to negative consequences like food shortages.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:24 AM

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

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Eliminating malaria: how close can we get?

Eliminating malaria: how close can we get? | People and Development | Scoop.it
James Whiting and Martin Edlund: Bill Gates’s ambitious vision for wiping malaria off the world map is not only possible but it is the strategic approach we should take

Via Adam Cooke
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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | People and Development | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before. Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment. Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.' The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa. Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed. On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

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Eliminating malaria: how close can we get?

Eliminating malaria: how close can we get? | People and Development | Scoop.it
James Whiting and Martin Edlund: Bill Gates’s ambitious vision for wiping malaria off the world map is not only possible but it is the strategic approach we should take

Via Adam Cooke
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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | People and Development | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 2, 9:46 PM

With developing science and the preaching of safe sex AIDS is on a downward curve in the number of deaths that it causes.  With the advancement of science and medicine it has been found what is working for those with AIDS and what combinations are found to be most beneficial.  Along with medicine however the topic of safe sex is being presented to people around the world.  With these strides that are being made AIDS is not as large of a topic as it was in the past.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:23 AM

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 1:51 PM

The story of AIDS, and of AIDS in Africa, is actually multiple stories. The perseverance of her people, the willingness (now) to put it on the front burner, sharing of information and technology all help to reduce the numbers of the dying.  HIV victims are living longer. Drugs are improving. Distribution of drugs is improving.

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | People and Development | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Scott Langston's curator insight, November 7, 8:53 PM
GLOBALISATION AND Macck
Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 8, 6:00 AM

A traditional approach of multicultural education may provide some interesting sociopolitical insights. 

aitouaddaC's curator insight, November 8, 3:44 PM

New in Charente : "Made for you" the menu in the Mc Donald's restaurant of Ruffec... (France)

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | People and Development | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 7, 1:32 AM

is enough commitment shown by the developed countries, I dont think so.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:24 AM

How Ebola sped out of control

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 7, 9:53 AM

unit 1

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'World grappling with malnutrition'

'World grappling with malnutrition' | People and Development | Scoop.it
Every nation on the planet, except China, is crossing a "malnutrition red line", suffering from too little or too much nutrition, a report warns.
Via JOHN SAYERS
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What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country

What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country | People and Development | Scoop.it
The term Gross Domestic Product is often talked about as if it were “handed down from god on tablets of stone.” But this concept was invented by an economist in the 1930s. We need a more effective measurement tool to match 21st century needs, says Michael Green: the Social Progress Index. With charm and wit, he shows how this tool measures societies across the three dimensions that actually matter. And reveals the dramatic reordering of nations that occurs when you use it.
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Colossal Green Value Farm Flourishes Within a Former Factory in China

Colossal Green Value Farm Flourishes Within a Former Factory in China | People and Development | Scoop.it
Value Farm is an amazing urban agriculture project in China by Thomas Chung that encourages local people to participate in a collective effort.
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Urban Spaces and Public Health Risk | Sustainable Cities Collective

Urban Spaces and Public Health Risk | Sustainable Cities Collective | People and Development | Scoop.it
The reality of a Thembisa mother is such: she travels sometimes five hours a day, too and from her job in Brummeria. She spends half her monthly income to pay for this transport. She has to use multiple taxis and trains and walks long distances on foot.
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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

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Urban Agriculture in New York City | Five Borough Farm

Urban Agriculture in New York City | Five Borough Farm | People and Development | Scoop.it
A project of the Design Trust for Public Space, Five Borough Farm provides a roadmap for expanding urban agriculture in New York City.

Via Adam Cooke
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A complete history of Ebola, in one graphic

A complete history of Ebola, in one graphic | People and Development | Scoop.it
The team at Involution Studios has put together an incredible graphic explainer of Ebola, how the disease works why this particular outbreak is so bad.
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Tourism Falling Off in Africa, Far Beyond the Ebola Zone

Tourism Falling Off in Africa, Far Beyond the Ebola Zone | People and Development | Scoop.it
A recent surge in tourism to Africa has come to a grinding halt.

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 2, 11:15 AM

unit 2

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2:48 PM

In population geography, carrying capacity is a serious issue when talking about an areas ability to provide food for the population. In the Sahel region, a 30% increase in population coupled with almost no growth in food production causes major concerns. We can see how population geography and resources can go hand in hand. If an area is unable to feed a growing population, then population growth will lead to negative consequences like food shortages.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:24 AM

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | People and Development | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 10, 10:13 AM

Democratic Republic of Congo

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 11:25 AM

This baffles me! To have all of these riches but still be the poorest country on earth. I guess greed destroys everything!  From the slave traders to the blood diamonds, something needs to change.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 17, 7:09 PM

This is a very good information for those people who do not know the situation in DR Congo (I include myself). Is very sad to see these kind of things or situation. The DR Congo is one of the richest countries on earth, but because of the colonialism , slavery and CORRUPTION have turned it into one of the poorest. This article mentions that there is a war in which at least more than 5 million of people have died. This historian, Dan Snow , is telling us how awful in the situation in DR Congo. In the end of this article, he answer many question made by the public, but the last question was the one that I find interesting. the question says if he could pick just one thing to change in Congo, what would be, he answer "The rule of law. People need protection when rights are violated, to start businesses and to find out where the money goes." I think that if that happen, life in DR Congo will be better.

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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | People and Development | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, September 29, 8:11 AM

I've been watching the numbers for some time and have felt, and told my students -- we would grow faster and more than previous predictions.  They have changed the #'s a few times.  This estimate seems more reasonable.

 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, October 2, 10:57 PM

This unit focuses on immigration and population. This article shows the aftermath of both. 

 

The Earth's population is currently at about 7.1 billion people. By the time people of my generation are old and ailing, we'll be at about a 35% increase! We can't even feed ourselves now. How will we feed 11 Billion? 

 

Scientists stress the importance of education—especially women in developing countries—and believe the problem can be controlled and dealt with. 

 

There are many issues that are sure to come in the advancing years—regarding ethics, politics, human rights, of course—but there is no way to be sure. 

 

Buckle up, everyone. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 11:46 AM

Population geography is a field that hinges on accurate data. These recent projections, if true, will alter how many countries approach population control in the future. If the UN is projecting the population to grow beyond 2100 and not level off than it is likely that in many countries anti-natal policies will start to be implemented, in some but not all cases it is likely these policies will back fire leaving some countries with populations that are too low to sustain the growth of their country. In Singapore for instance, in the 1970s the government enacted anti-natal policies that were so effective that by the mid 1980s they had negative population growth and not enough workers to replace their aging workplace. If the populations grow as the U.N. projects we may see similar circumstances occur.

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Brazil's ethanol revolution

"United Nations, June 2008 - The bio-fuel, ethanol, is generating a revolution in renewable energy that could help reduce the world's thirst for oil. In Brazil, the production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming, but what is not clear is the impact it is having on the industry's sugarcane cutters."  Transcript of video available here.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 7, 10:29 AM

The idea of Brazil using sugarcane to partly fuel cars could be a brilliant idea.  However the effects that is has may not be.  With this concept the idea of the sugarcane cutters would be no longer in existence.  This puts droves of people out of work.  Officials say that they will absorb these cutters into other jobs, but will that really be a way to give everyone a job?  Environmentally, however, the idea is good as they will no longer be setting controlled fires to help the cutters harvest the sugarcane.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 8, 12:39 PM

In a time where alternative energy sources are sorely needed Brazil's sugar cane ethonal is very interesting. While it mIgbo not be the answer to our problems it is at least the sign that nations can be willing to throw support and funding into alternative energy. Another aspect of it is how will this affect the Native Brazilians, especially those in the sugar cane industry. Will they loss their livelihood to more efficient machines or will the ethonal simply increase in value untill the locals can no longer afford it.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 7:38 PM

Brazil's ethanol revolution is showing how the country is using its agriculture to help out its economy, but with the increase in cane production comes the laying off of all the manual cutters. Essentially, the countries success in ethanol production is resulting in job loss for the workers that made the production of ethanol as popular as it.