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Infographics

Infographics | People and Development | Scoop.it

A great infographic that looks at the differences between agroecolocy and industrial agriculture. Would be very helpful for those students looking at organic farming, permaculture or food security issues. 

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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rob Duke's curator insight, June 7, 10:45 AM

It's mostly about free institutions.  Latitude has been shown to not matter in the long term (see Australia, for instance).

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 7, 11:38 AM

But behind it all, the reasons why some countries are poor while others are rich, depends on the historic agreements made that enabled—or disabled—the potential for production of goods rather than the simple extraction of resources under rigged conditions. Take a look at The Open Veins of Latin America by Eduardo Galeano to find out how this happened with "poor" Latin America, a look at history going back all the way to the Conquest of the Spanish, the Trade Agreements between England and Portugal which derived in the destruction of the textile industry in colonial Brazil ... and perhaps do consider reading Naomi Klein"s The Shock Doctrine. Behind the scenes you have a serious case of Political Ponerology and Monetary Fraud.

Henk Trimp's curator insight, June 12, 6:26 AM

Questionable, but intriguing contribution to an ever continuing discussion...

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The hidden reason for poverty the world needs to address now

The hidden reason for poverty the world needs to address now | People and Development | Scoop.it
Collective compassion has meant an overall decrease in global poverty since the 1980s, says civil rights lawyer Gary Haugen. Yet for all the world's aid money, there's a pervasive hidden problem keeping poverty alive. Haugen reveals the dark underlying cause we must recognize and act on now.
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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | People and Development | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."


Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Ag Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:52 AM

Development and diffusion of agriculture-

This article explains how agriculture has developed and grown for thousands of years, and today with our technology, we can do what seemed impossible to the past peoples.

This article represents Development and Diffusion of Agriculture by showing how in our past years, we could mostly only do substinence agriculture, but today with technology, we can do so much more, with so much less people.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:59 AM

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts-

This article explains how today we have the best technology we have ever created agriculture-wise, but with this, more land has been used. But thanks to precision agriculture, we can use data to determine where we can use the least amount of raw materials needed, thus helping protect more land than before.

 This article demonstrates land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts by showing how with the technology today and precision farming, we can use less raw materials than ever before, thus helping lessen global impact.

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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | People and Development | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 1:41 AM

This HDI model is showing rankings of Central America. The HDI combines stats like life expectancy, education, and per capita income and compares countries to one another. This is an interesting graph to observe ans study because people should be able to have the knowledge of their country compared to others and where places lie in comparison to their neighboring countries. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:28 AM

Population Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

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The Weekly: Foreign Aid - YouTube

Charlie unpacks the debate on whether or not we should cut foreign aid. See more on iview: http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/week... Catch The Weekly on ABC T...
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▶ How to Feed the World? - YouTube


Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 3:38 AM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world

CD - The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably feed the projected future population to achieve food security for Australia and the world.


Many concepts here useful also for  Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | People and Development | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."


Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
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Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 10:11 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about declining population being a problem in many highly developed European countries, and measures that administrations are going through in these countries to promote population growth. In Denmark during sex ed, children are not only taught how to be safe and use contraceptives, but also the benefits of having children as a way to encourage this. Sweden compensates both moms and dads for staying at home with their new born children for up to a year, and it is very cheap to raise a child in France.

 

All of these measures relate to saving declining populations through government promotions to raise the population. This shows that not only rising populations are an issue to account for, but falling ones as well. 

Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 11:41 PM

Summary: This article touches on the methods that several different European countries have tried to create a population growth by convincing the public to have more children. From TV ads, to discount prices for children, these countries try several methods to aid in their countries population crisis. 

 

Insight: This is an extremely odd article, in that the European ideas to grow populations are somewhat unconventional and strange. The Danish dating website made only for people who want to have children struck me as especially strange, in the new couples in the US don't even talk about children until way into the relationship. It relates to unit 2 in that it shows European population growth and decline, which eventually can lead to economic instability. 

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 12:53 PM

Effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries or reducing fertility rates in others-

This article explains how Europe's population is starting to run lower and lower, so governments are trying to get people to have more children. In fact, the government is doing as much as they can without intervening with the families.

This article shows effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries  by showing how some countries populations are declining, and the government is doing everything they can to get the fertility rate up again.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | People and Development | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


Via Seth Dixon
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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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This is where Australia's imported food comes from

This is where Australia's imported food comes from | People and Development | Scoop.it
See where Australia imports food from with this interactive graphic
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The size of it

The size of it | People and Development | Scoop.it
How the world's population has changedTHE world in 1950 looked very different from how it does now. Europe was home to 22% of the world's 2.5 billion people....
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What school lunches look like around the world

What school lunches look like around the world | People and Development | Scoop.it
Schoolchildren in Spain, Ukraine, Greece, South Korea, Brazil, France, Finland and Italy eat a remarkable array of fresh foods for lunch, unlike the UK and US trays, which are full of processed items.
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon, Adam Cooke
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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:47 AM

unit 2

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Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing

Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing | People and Development | Scoop.it
Visualised in graphs I am presenting the long-term data on how we are changing our world. This is the Empirical View on How We Are Making Our World a Better Place. Topic by topic I cover the decline of violence and the increase of tolerance and political rights. Improving living standards, health and well-being; population changes and associated success in preserving our environment. Increasing knowledge about our word and spreading education.
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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | People and Development | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 9, 10:10 PM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations

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Breakfast around the world – gallery

Breakfast around the world – gallery | People and Development | Scoop.it
How nutritious is your first meal of the day? We asked our community to share pictures of what breakfast looks like where they live. Here are our favourites
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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.


Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:38 PM

Agriculture

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:44 AM

unit 5

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The next outbreak? We’re not ready

The next outbreak? We’re not ready | People and Development | Scoop.it
In 2014, the world avoided a global outbreak of Ebola, thanks to thousands of selfless health workers -- plus, frankly, some very good luck. In hindsight, we know what we should have done better. So, now's the time, Bill Gates suggests, to put all our good ideas into practice, from scenario planning to vaccine research to health worker training. As he says, "There's no need to panic ... but we need to get going."
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Social Progress Index

Social Progress Index | People and Development | Scoop.it
The Social Progress Imperative creates a shared language and common goals to align different organizations and achieve greater social impact.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 3:03 PM

I think we all know that we shouldn't judge a country just by it's GDP.  Economic development might be correlated with development and social progress, but the outliers are so telling.  In this TED talk, we learn about a new metric designed to measure how well a society provides opportunities for communal and individual success.  Having lived in Costa Rica for two years, I'm not surprised to find that Costa Rica does much better on this index than it would if we were to use GDP or HDI as a way to measure social progress and quality of life. For a more detailed look at the United States, see Geographies of Opportunity: Ranking well-being by Congressional Districts.        


Questions to Ponder: How is the Social Progress Index similar to and different from the Human Development Index?  What assumptions are built into the system? 


Tags: development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica, mapping.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:45 PM

Interactive map showing different categories of social progress

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 10:34 PM

Summary: This article included an interactive map that was based on the Social Progress Index, which is an organization that measures how developed a country is based on the basic human needs available, access to education and healthcare, and personal rights and choices. The general pattern was that developed countries had higher amounts of these things, while developing countries obviously had less. This is similar, but more refined, than the UN Human Development Index, which measures more than just social factors. 

 

Insight: This model can go hand in hand with the UN Human Development Index, which measures the progress of each country on much more different scales. This has been more refined to social issues, but the same patterns can be seen in both indexes. 

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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | People and Development | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 9, 10:10 PM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations

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Which is the poorest city in the world?

Which is the poorest city in the world? | People and Development | Scoop.it
Ranking hardship is not a simple, or happy, task – but as the world urbanises, city poverty becomes ever more important. Here are the places that struggle most
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'World grappling with malnutrition'

'World grappling with malnutrition' | People and Development | Scoop.it
Every nation on the planet, except China, is crossing a "malnutrition red line", suffering from too little or too much nutrition, a report warns.
Via JOHN SAYERS
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Ebola: how to prevent a lethal legacy for food security

Ebola: how to prevent a lethal legacy for food security | People and Development | Scoop.it
The World Food Programme warns that 1.4 million people could become malnourished because of Ebola. We must act quickly to avoid catastrophe
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Orphanage trips by Aussie schools are doing more harm than good

Orphanage trips by Aussie schools are doing more harm than good | People and Development | Scoop.it
Australian private schools are increasingly taking their senior students to volunteer in orphanages, but they're doing more harm than good.
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Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future

Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future | People and Development | Scoop.it

Neglecting the health of Africa's soil will lock the continent into a cycle of food insecurity for generations to come, a report warns.


Via JOHN SAYERS
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