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Myths about industrial agriculture

Myths about industrial agriculture | People and Development | Scoop.it
Organic farming is the "only way to produce food" without harming the planet and people's health.

 

A great article on the organic movement, as well as the negatives associated with 'industrial agriculture'. Great for the Year 12 research task if you have chosen this topic.  

 

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What school lunches look like around the world

What school lunches look like around the world | People and Development | Scoop.it
Schoolchildren in Spain, Ukraine, Greece, South Korea, Brazil, France, Finland and Italy eat a remarkable array of fresh foods for lunch, unlike the UK and US trays, which are full of processed items.
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon, Adam Cooke
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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, November 26, 2014 7:14 AM

Até a pirâmide demográfica está em crise!

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | People and Development | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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BBC Health Care Future of Food Part 3 Food in Cuba Discovery 2013 - YouTube

Documentary 2014, bbc documentary,bbc,national geographic,documentary,national geographic documentary,Structure,documentaries, documentary films, documentari...

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BBC Future of Food - Part 2: Senegal - YouTube

Future of Food - Part 2: Senegal George heads out to India to discover how a changing diet in the developing world is putting pressure on the world's limited...

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6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography

6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography | People and Development | Scoop.it
Ever wonder where your food comes from? Feast your eyes on these amazing agriculture maps and learn what the future of agriculture holds.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 18, 12:50 AM

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world

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Eat: The Story of Food

Eat: The Story of Food | People and Development | Scoop.it
Take a tasty journey through history to discover how food shaped our world in Nat Geo’s Eat: The Story of Food.
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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | People and Development | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Hipsters At Whole Foods May Be Hurting A Lot More People Than They Realize

Hipsters At Whole Foods May Be Hurting A Lot More People Than They Realize | People and Development | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
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China's One Child Policy: Infographic

China's One Child Policy: Infographic | People and Development | Scoop.it

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Adam Cooke's curator insight, October 15, 2014 4:56 AM

Infographic on China's One Child Policy and its implementation. #geographyteacher

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:09 PM

This article discuses the increasing problem within Africa's Sahel, the increasing lack of food. The real cause of this is the fact the area is under constant strain both from nature as well as human conflict. As wars and conflicts continue more and more refugees are driven from their homes. This means less working on farms as well as more hungry people occupying this dry region. Unfortunately the way to solve this crises is to end the fighting which is not only incredibly difficult but bordering on impossible.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:46 AM

With the world population growing at a rapid rate, what will the food supply of some of these under developed countries look like when the expected population rate to hit 1 billion by 2050? In the Sahel, how are people going to use a desert like environment to produce crops that will feed its growing population? Its seems as if their problem is growing a rate faster than they can resolve.Will food plants be the new thing in their future?

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Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future

Africa 'soil crisis threat' to future | People and Development | Scoop.it

Neglecting the health of Africa's soil will lock the continent into a cycle of food insecurity for generations to come, a report warns.


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Green agriculture: A food revolution

Green agriculture: A food revolution | People and Development | Scoop.it
Allianz Knowledge on Environment: Agriculture’s Green Revolution rescued millions from starvation in the 20th century but failed to eradicate hunger. With global food demand set to grow by 50 percent by 2030, the new century needs a new agricultural revolution.

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Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive

Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps – interactive | People and Development | Scoop.it
The MDGs expire this year and the SDGs begin. But what are the SDGs all about?

Via Adam Cooke
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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | People and Development | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


Via Seth Dixon, Adam Cooke
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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 4:22 PM

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:43 PM

demographic shifts within China

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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | People and Development | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state

 

Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.

 

Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jane Ellingson's curator insight, February 20, 12:37 PM

stage V?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 7:37 PM

Italy has hit historic a historic low birth rate, the lowest since the countries formation in 1861. This is hugely impacted from the south of the country while the North’s birth rate remains 1.5% above average. 2014 birth rate was 5,000 fewer than in 2013 completing half a century or decline. Plummeting birth rates are due to a crippling economy. On top of lower birth rates people are living longer also. This creates problem with increased payouts in healthcare, and pensions. Italy is a dying country. For my Italian ancestry this is sad news. I will take pride in passing on my Italian heritage. As for a solution, this should look at Belgium or countries that are encouraging increased birth rate. More kids could work on farms to produce ever need crops for sustaining the society. 

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'World grappling with malnutrition'

'World grappling with malnutrition' | People and Development | Scoop.it
Every nation on the planet, except China, is crossing a "malnutrition red line", suffering from too little or too much nutrition, a report warns.
Via JOHN SAYERS
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What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country

What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country | People and Development | Scoop.it
The term Gross Domestic Product is often talked about as if it were “handed down from god on tablets of stone.” But this concept was invented by an economist in the 1930s. We need a more effective measurement tool to match 21st century needs, says Michael Green: the Social Progress Index. With charm and wit, he shows how this tool measures societies across the three dimensions that actually matter. And reveals the dramatic reordering of nations that occurs when you use it.
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Colossal Green Value Farm Flourishes Within a Former Factory in China

Colossal Green Value Farm Flourishes Within a Former Factory in China | People and Development | Scoop.it
Value Farm is an amazing urban agriculture project in China by Thomas Chung that encourages local people to participate in a collective effort.
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Urban Spaces and Public Health Risk | Sustainable Cities Collective

Urban Spaces and Public Health Risk | Sustainable Cities Collective | People and Development | Scoop.it
The reality of a Thembisa mother is such: she travels sometimes five hours a day, too and from her job in Brummeria. She spends half her monthly income to pay for this transport. She has to use multiple taxis and trains and walks long distances on foot.
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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.