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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | People and Development | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 17, 7:09 PM

This is a very good information for those people who do not know the situation in DR Congo (I include myself). Is very sad to see these kind of things or situation. The DR Congo is one of the richest countries on earth, but because of the colonialism , slavery and CORRUPTION have turned it into one of the poorest. This article mentions that there is a war in which at least more than 5 million of people have died. This historian, Dan Snow , is telling us how awful in the situation in DR Congo. In the end of this article, he answer many question made by the public, but the last question was the one that I find interesting. the question says if he could pick just one thing to change in Congo, what would be, he answer "The rule of law. People need protection when rights are violated, to start businesses and to find out where the money goes." I think that if that happen, life in DR Congo will be better.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 3:26 PM

The Democratic Republic of Congo is a prime example of the long term effects of imperialistic resource exploitation. The DRC is blessed with an abundance of natural resources that could potentially make it incredibly wealthy. Unfortunately, foreign interest has created a disconnect between the DRC and its resources. Historically, imperialistic forces have stripped the country from any form of self-run government, causing power struggles between different indigenous peoples and a history of war, political chaos and corruption. Though it is no longer a colony controlled by a foreign country, international corporations are still using the unequal development in order to benefit while the country itself lies in shambles. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:49 AM

Through centuries of perpetual instability has led to the Congo's current squalid conditions. Because of the countries rich natural resources and massive size, its infrastructure was intentionally destroyed in order easier access to its natural wealth. This shows how abundant resources can be a negative factor, by attracting predatory foreigners who care nothing for the local populous. It also shows how important strong political and cultural structures are necessary to create cohesion and security in a country.

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 11:09 PM

This article discuses the increasing problem within Africa's Sahel, the increasing lack of food. The real cause of this is the fact the area is under constant strain both from nature as well as human conflict. As wars and conflicts continue more and more refugees are driven from their homes. This means less working on farms as well as more hungry people occupying this dry region. Unfortunately the way to solve this crises is to end the fighting which is not only incredibly difficult but bordering on impossible.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 11:46 AM

With the world population growing at a rapid rate, what will the food supply of some of these under developed countries look like when the expected population rate to hit 1 billion by 2050? In the Sahel, how are people going to use a desert like environment to produce crops that will feed its growing population? Its seems as if their problem is growing a rate faster than they can resolve.Will food plants be the new thing in their future?

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | People and Development | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 7, 1:32 AM

is enough commitment shown by the developed countries, I dont think so.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:24 AM

How Ebola sped out of control

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 7, 9:53 AM

unit 1

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | People and Development | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."


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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:44 PM

I don't believe its a refugee's duty to return to their country. I think after some time people start their lives over, for a reason. Most refugees leave their country because it is so bad. This family in the video went to another country and he was there for almost twenty years, that is a long time.  when your in a place for that long going back would mean starting over again. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 5:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | People and Development | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 1:51 PM

The story of AIDS, and of AIDS in Africa, is actually multiple stories. The perseverance of her people, the willingness (now) to put it on the front burner, sharing of information and technology all help to reduce the numbers of the dying.  HIV victims are living longer. Drugs are improving. Distribution of drugs is improving.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 9:20 PM

The worldwide HIV/AIDS epidemic has the weight of researchers, clinicians, NGOs and governments working hard to reverse the epidemic. However, despite the success in increasing the number of people on treatment and reducing the overall rate of infection, still millions of people are continuing to be infected every year. So there is no time for complacency here. People living with HIV face many health issues and stigma from others, despite the good news that with treatment they can have a longer life than before.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 10:16 AM

Western broadcasting television has done a great job at Demonizing the African Continent. Not only do they portray the Continent as one country sharing the same cultural experience, they have also done a great job as portraying the continent as one that is ridding with diseases, and poverty. One thing they often neglect to do is highlight the great strides African countries are making to combat these diseases. The country would be able to conquer more infectious diseases such as malaria and cholera if they had the proper medical equipment to do so. 

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | People and Development | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 11:09 PM

This article discuses the increasing problem within Africa's Sahel, the increasing lack of food. The real cause of this is the fact the area is under constant strain both from nature as well as human conflict. As wars and conflicts continue more and more refugees are driven from their homes. This means less working on farms as well as more hungry people occupying this dry region. Unfortunately the way to solve this crises is to end the fighting which is not only incredibly difficult but bordering on impossible.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 11:46 AM

With the world population growing at a rapid rate, what will the food supply of some of these under developed countries look like when the expected population rate to hit 1 billion by 2050? In the Sahel, how are people going to use a desert like environment to produce crops that will feed its growing population? Its seems as if their problem is growing a rate faster than they can resolve.Will food plants be the new thing in their future?

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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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Africa Next

Africa Next | People and Development | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!