Pensamiento crítico y su integración en el Curriculum
11.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Pensamiento crítico y su integración en el Curriculum
Importancia creciente del pensamiento crítico (y creativo) en la actual Sociedad Red y del Conocimiento. Importancia de su integración en el sistema educativo, con la consiguiente nueva pedagogía 'critica' y 'entre iguales'. Desarrollo de habilidades superiores del pensamiento (Nivel superior de la Taxonomía de Bloom 'revisada'). Thinking Skills, Thinking Tools.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by enrique rubio royo from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Scoop.it!

What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter?

What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter? | Pensamiento crítico y su integración en el Curriculum | Scoop.it
Working memory is your brain's Post-it note, says Tracy Packiam Alloway, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida. "It makes all the difference to successful learning," she says.

You can think of working memory as the active part of your memory system. It's like mental juggling, says H. Lee Swanson, Ph.D., distinguished professor of education with the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. "As information comes in, you're processing it at the same time as you store it," he says. A child uses this skill when doing math calculations or listening to a story, for example. She has to hold onto the numbers while working with them. Or, she needs to remember the sequence of events and also think of what the story is about, says Swanson.If working memory is weak, it can trip up just about anyone. But it really works against a child with learning disabilities (LD). You can take steps to help a child with weak working memory, whether or not LD is a part of the picture.


Via Tom Perran, Carolyn D Cowen, Lou Salza
enrique rubio royo's insight:

Importancia de la memoria de trabajo a la hora de aprender...

 

"Tracy Packiam Alloway: working memory is a better test of ability than IQ"

 

Automated Working Memory Assessment (AWMA) vs IQ (coeficiente de inteligencial).

 

Otras referencias de interés...Making, Playing, Learning and Working Memory (http://classroom-aid.com/2012/12/17/making-playing-learning-and-working-memory/); How does working memory work in the classroom? (How does working memory work in the classroom?); working memory | Tumblr http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/working%20memory); ...

 

muy interesante en cuanto a las funciones ejecutivas y redes cerebrales asociadas (UDL).

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by enrique rubio royo from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Pensamiento crítico y su integración en el Curriculum | Scoop.it

Enrique Rubio: muy interesante y recomendable referencia; totalmente de acuerdo en la propuesta que se hace de hacer valer frente a los estándares basados en contenidos los estándares orientados a las habilidades requeridas para la Sociedad del S. XXI, y en consecuencia desarrollar una pedagogía que incluya  la 'curación de contenidos' por parte de los estudiantes.  Ello conlleva plantear y responder diferentes preguntas como: ¿bajo qué tipo de pedagogía?, ¿qué tipo de curación?, ¿cómo llevarlo a cabo?, ¿qué tipos de habilidades a desarrollar durante el proceso?, ¿cómo formar a los profesores en estos nuevos paradigmas?, ... que en el artículo se tratan, basándose en una experiencia concreta en Historia.

 

La propuesta que desde el modelo Suricata hacemos, y que incluye la curación de contenidos por parte del estudiante, se basa en el desarrollo del perfil 'eAprendiz', tanto para el profesorado como para los estudiantes, en el contexto de una pedagogía 'crítica, creativa, de diseño, entre iguales, centrada en el aprendizaje, el estudiante y en la generación de valor.

 

Información relacionada...  Integración de las TICs para el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico y creativo, en la educación superior.http://tinyurl.com/c7gfjq2

 

 

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students ae expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good
more...
Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

Rescooped by enrique rubio royo from La brecha de la complejidad
Scoop.it!

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Edudemic

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Edudemic | Pensamiento crítico y su integración en el Curriculum | Scoop.it
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process.
more...
enrique rubio royo's curator insight, January 4, 2013 7:39 AM

Interesante infografía (http://edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/theories-of-learning-fixed.jpg) en la que se pretende dar respuesta a la 'compleja' cuestión de ¿cómo aprendemos?, visualizando y comparando cuatro teorias de aprendizaje: Conductismo, Cognitivismo, Constructivismo y Conectivismo.