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Curated by Pedro Barbosa
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UPDATE on Bioinformatics Open Days 2013 - Submissions accetped until 22nd February! Join us.

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Chromosome Walk - A saunter along the human genome | SIB

Chromosome walk: a virtual exhibition to discover human genome, DNA, genes, proteins and bioinformatics
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Bioinformatics conference :: 14th and 15th of March :: Braga, Portugal :: Come and join us !!

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Bioinformatics Open Days event will occur in the 14th and 15th of March of 2013 at the University of Minho in Braga. It will be a great opportunity to bring together a community interested in the field of Bioinformatics.

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GEN | Insight & Intelligence™: Eric Schadt's Top 5 Genomic Predictions

GEN | Insight & Intelligence™: Eric Schadt's Top 5 Genomic Predictions | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Here are the five biggest advances the director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai expects to see from genomic research in five years.
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Astronomers discover remnants of 1,500 km long river on Mars

Astronomers discover remnants of 1,500 km long river on Mars | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

New astonishing pictures by the European Space Agency have revealed a 1500 km long and 7 kilometre wide river that once ran across Mars.

 

The agency’s Mars Express imaged the striking upper part of the remnants of Reull Vallis river on Mars with its high-resolution stereo camera, ESA said in a statement.

 

New analogies are giving planetary geologists tantalising glimpses of a past on the Red Planet not too dissimilar to events on our own world today.

Reull Vallis, is believed to have formed when running water flowed in the distant martian past, cutting a steep-sided channel through the Promethei Terra Highlands before running on towards the floor of the vast Hellas basin.

This sinuous structure, which stretches for almost 1500 km across the martian landscape, is flanked by numerous tributaries, one of which can be clearly seen cutting in to the main valley towards the upper (north) side.

The new Mars Express images show a region of Reull Vallis at a point where the channel is almost 7 km wide and 300 m deep. The sides of Reull Vallis are particularly sharp and steep, with parallel longitudinal features covering the floor of the channel itself.

 

These structures are believed to be caused by the passage of loose debris and ice during the “Amazonian” period – which continues to this day – due to glacial flow along the channel.

 

The structures were formed long after it was originally carved by liquid water during the Hesperian period, which is believed to have ended between 3.5 billion and 1.8 billion years ago.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Homolog.us Welcomes #PAGXXI Attendees With a Blog Guide « Homologus

Homolog.us Welcomes #PAGXXI Attendees With a Blog Guide « Homologus | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

A nice Bioinformatics guide about all the stuff posted on the blog over the last two years!

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Genome scientists launch Microbiome journal

Genome scientists launch Microbiome journal | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Two prominent microbiologists have launched a new peer-reviewed publication focusing on microbiome research in environmental, agricultural, and biomedical areas.
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ENCODE Results Spur New Research, Technology Development | New York Genome Center

ENCODE Results Spur New Research, Technology Development | New York Genome Center | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

It’s been four months since the international ENCODE project produced a detailed map of the elements and organization of the human genome. Now its results are guiding new studies and technology developments

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Social Media Revolution 2013: the video « Learning in the Social Workplace

Social Media Revolution 2013: the video « Learning in the Social Workplace | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Social Media Revolution 2013: the video http://t.co/RmpXOzdz #YouTube

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, December 31, 2012 9:03 AM

We Need A Revolution!

Scott Turner's comment, December 31, 2012 1:45 PM
some interesting statistics.
Socius Ars's curator insight, April 10, 2013 11:55 AM

add your insight...

 
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PLOS ONE: The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation

PLOS ONE: The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

Via Chris Upton + helpers
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Gene discovery could change thinking on cancer development | Genome Engineering

Gene discovery could change thinking on cancer development | Genome Engineering | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Researchers have found mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer – but they are in blood cells not cancer cells, and are not inherited. This could mean a completely new mechanism of cancer development.
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Top 10 Innovations 2012 | The Scientist Magazine®

Top 10 Innovations 2012 | The Scientist Magazine® | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.
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NASA Voyager 1 Encounters New Region in Deep Space

NASA Voyager 1 Encounters New Region in Deep Space | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered a new region at the far reaches of our solar system that scientists feel is the final area the spacecraft has to cross before reaching interstellar space.

 

Scientists refer to this new region as a magnetic highway for charged particles because our sun's magnetic field lines are connected to interstellar magnetic field lines. This connection allows lower-energy charged particles that originate from inside our heliosphere -- or the bubble of charged particles the sun blows around itself -- to zoom out and allows higher-energy particles from outside to stream in. Before entering this region, the charged particles bounced around in all directions, as if trapped on local roads inside the heliosphere.

 

The Voyager team infers this region is still inside our solar bubble because the direction of the magnetic field lines has not changed. The direction of these magnetic field lines is predicted to change when Voyager breaks through to interstellar space. The new results were described at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco on Monday.

 

"Although Voyager 1 still is inside the sun's environment, we now can taste what it's like on the outside because the particles are zipping in and out on this magnetic highway," said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. "We believe this is the last leg of our journey to interstellar space. Our best guess is it's likely just a few months to a couple years away. The new region isn't what we expected, but we've come to expect the unexpected from Voyager."

 

Since December 2004, when Voyager 1 crossed a point in space called the termination shock, the spacecraft has been exploring the heliosphere's outer layer, called the heliosheath. In this region, the stream of charged particles from the sun, known as the solar wind, abruptly slowed down from supersonic speeds and became turbulent. Voyager 1's environment was consistent for about five and a half years. The spacecraft then detected that the outward speed of the solar wind slowed to zero.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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4.5 Billion 'Alien Earths' Calculated to Populate Our Own Milky Way

4.5 Billion 'Alien Earths' Calculated to Populate Our Own Milky Way | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Billions of Earth-like alien planets likely reside in our Milky Way galaxy, and the nearest such world may be just a stone's throw away in the cosmic scheme of things, a new study reports.

 

Astronomers have calculated that 6 percent of the galaxy's 75 billion or so red dwarfs — stars smaller and dimmer than the Earth's own sun — probably host habitable, roughly Earth-size planets. That works out to at least 4.5 billion such "alien Earths," the closest of which might be found a mere dozen light-years away, researchers said.

 

"We thought we would have to search vast distances to find an Earth-like planet," study lead author Courtney Dressing, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), said in a statement. "Now we realize another Earth is probably in our own backyard, waiting to be spotted."

 

Dressing and her team analyzed data gathered by NASA's prolific Kepler space telescope, which is staring continuously at more than 150,000 target stars. Kepler spots alien planets by flagging the tiny brightness dips caused when the planets transit, or cross the face of, their stars from the instrument's perspective.

 

Kepler has detected 2,740 exoplanet candidates since its March 2009 launch. Follow-up observations have confirmed only 105 of these possibilities to date, but mission scientists estimate that more than 90 percent will end up being the real deal.

 

In the new study, Dressing and her colleagues re-analyzed the red dwarfs in Kepler's field of view and found that nearly all are smaller and cooler than previously thought.

 

This new information bears strongly on the search for Earth-like alien planets, since roughly 75 percent of the galaxy's 100 billion or so stars are red dwarfs. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Gareth Harris's curator insight, February 8, 2013 11:47 AM

ET may only be a stones throw away!

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Hold on. Mutations in cancer do good.

Hold on. Mutations in cancer do good. | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Reporter: Prabodh Kandala, PhDA typical cancer cell has thousands of mutations scattered throughout its genome and hundreds of mutated genes. However, only a handful of those genes, known as driver are responsible for cancerous traits such as uncontrolled growth. Cancer biologists have largely ignored the other mutations, believing they had little or no impact on cancer progression.

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PacBio Aims to Reach Average Read of Lengths of 7000-9000 Bases in 2013

PacBio Aims to Reach Average Read of Lengths of 7000-9000 Bases in 2013 | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

The next-generation sequencing technology company, announced that PacBio is looking to improve upon on read length, accuracy, and throughput in 2013.

 

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Professor seeks woman to give birth to Neanderthal

Professor seeks woman to give birth to Neanderthal | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Technology and ethics are discussed in an interview with a professor hoping to clone Neanderthals using genome sequencing
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Pedro Barbosa's comment, January 25, 2013 1:47 PM
Seems to not be entirely true these statements!
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Four-strand DNA structure found in cells

Four-strand DNA structure found in cells | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Unusual nucleic-acid structure may have role in regulating some genes.
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The Internet map

The Internet map | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Via Susan Bainbridge
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David Hain's curator insight, January 10, 2013 2:59 AM

Interesting but only if you use the zoom button.

Matmi's curator insight, January 10, 2013 7:10 AM

A map of the internet- really cool to see it laid out like this. Each dot represents a different website , and the bigger the dot the more website the traffic recieves.- HK

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Studies find hardy Earth microbes may resist conditions on Mars | Reuters

Studies find hardy Earth microbes may resist conditions on Mars | Reuters | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (Reuters) - A hardy bacteria common on Earth was surprisingly adaptive to Mars-like low pressure, cold and carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere, a finding that has implications in the...
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Genetic mutation message could shock smokers into stopping

Genetic mutation message could shock smokers into stopping | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
The UK Department of Health’s stop smoking campaign for 2013 is focusing on the finding that every 15 cigarettes smoked can trigger a genetic mutation that could lead to cancer, with graphic images showing tumours growing out of cigarettes.
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27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012

27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012 | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
We may never have our flying cars, but the future is here. From creating fully functioning artificial leaves to hacking the human brain, science made a lot of breakthroughs this year.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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CLAIRE YOUNG's curator insight, August 23, 7:26 AM

So is there some truth to the fiction we see in film…… how could that impact the audiences enjoyment of the film?

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Time-lapse writing of a research paper

Time-lapse writing of a research paper | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
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The first-ever image of a massive river system on another world

The first-ever image of a massive river system on another world | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
This image was taken by the space probe Cassini, and shows what appears to be a massive river system on Saturn's moon Titan. The European Space Agency reports that it flows 400 km across the cloudy moon's surface, where it meets a large sea.

Scientists deduce that the river is filled with liquid because it appears dark along its entire extent in the high-resolution radar image, indicating a smooth surface.

"Though there are some short, local meanders, the relative straightness of the river valley suggests it follows the trace of at least one fault, similar to other large rivers running into the southern margin of this same Titan sea," says Jani Radebaugh, a Cassini radar team associate at Brigham Young University, USA.

"Such faults – fractures in Titan's bedrock – may not imply plate tectonics, like on Earth, but still lead to the opening of basins and perhaps to the formation of the giant seas themselves."

Titan is the only other world we know of that has stable liquid on its surface. While Earth's hydrologic cycle relies on water, Titan's equivalent cycle involves hydrocarbons such as ethane and methane.

Images from Cassini's visible-light cameras in late 2010 revealed regions that darkened after recent rainfall.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The incredible origami house that can change shape depending on the weather

The incredible origami house that can change shape depending on the weather | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

This new incredible folding house is able to, in the words of its creators, 'metamorphosize' into eight different configurations to adapt to seasonal, meteorological and even astronomical conditions. For example, in the summer plan, bedroom one faces east and watches the sun rise as its inhabitants wake up. It can then rotate so that the user is constantly in sunlight, while the house generates energy through its solar panels. The revolutionary home is based on the work of an early 20th Century mathematician who discovered a way to dissect a square and rearrange its parts into an equilateral triangle.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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