Innovation and Sc...
Follow
Find
513 views | +0 today
Innovation and Science breakthroughs
Fascinating ideas for which i'm interested on.
Curated by Pedro Barbosa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Earth is surrounded by a 'bubble' of live bacteria - at 33 000 feet

Earth is surrounded by a 'bubble' of live bacteria - at 33 000 feet | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there. Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles. Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

 

Scientists don’t yet know what the bacteria are doing up there, but they may be essential to how the atmosphere functions, says Kostas Konstantinidis, an environmental microbiologist on the Georgia Tech team. For example, they could be responsible for recycling nutrients in the atmosphere, like they do on Earth. And similar to other particles, they could influence weather patterns by helping clouds form. However, they also may be transmitting diseases from one side of the globe to the other. The researchers found E. coli in their samples (which they think hurricanes lifted from cities), and they plan to investigate whether plagues are raining down on us. If we can find out more about the role of bacteria in the atmosphere, says Ann Womack, a microbial ecologist at the University of Oregon, scientists could even fight climate change by engineering the bacteria to break down greenhouse gases into other, less harmful compounds.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Ed Rybicki's comment, June 25, 2013 3:39 AM
Hey, it's a microbial world - literally! From way above our heads, to way below our feet.
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, June 27, 2013 1:21 AM

we are everywhere)

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:31 AM

we'll have that one in our book as well

 

Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Sequenced genomes per year | The Su Lab

Sequenced genomes per year | The Su Lab | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

As part of building the case for creating our proposed CMOD resource, we wanted to know just how quickly the number of sequenced genomes was increasing. The thinking is that the more genomes are being sequenced, the more genomes there are that are going with virtually no community bioinformatics support.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Unknown Mathematician Solves a Major Problem in Number Theory - Homologus

Unknown Mathematician Solves a Major Problem in Number Theory - Homologus | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

On April 17, a paper arrived in the inbox of Annals of Mathematics, one of the discipline’s preeminent journals. Written by a mathematician virtually unknown to the experts in his field — a 50-something lecturer at the University of New Hampshire named Yitang Zhang — the paper claimed to have taken a huge step forward in understanding one of mathematics’ oldest problems, the twin primes conjecture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Carnivorous plant throws out 'junk' DNA

Carnivorous plant throws out 'junk' DNA | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
The newly sequenced genome of the carnivorous bladderwort contradicts the notion that vast quantities of noncoding 'junk' DNA are crucial for complex life.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Bio-informatics
Scoop.it!

An accurate binding interaction model in de nov...

An accurate binding interaction model in de nov... | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Computational protein design efforts aim to create novel proteins and functions in an automated manner and, in the process, these efforts shed light on the factors shaping natural proteins.

Via Loiret David
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Nice video - The True Science of Parallel Universes

Oh, Hey! MinuteEarth! http://youtube.com/minuteearth .........and you can also subscribe to MinutePhysics! http://dft.ba/-minutephysics_sub MinutePhysics is ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Biological transistor enables computing within living cells

Biological transistor enables computing within living cells | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
A team of Stanford University bioengineers has taken computing beyond mechanics and electronics into the living realm of biology. They have developed a biological transistor made from genetic material — DNA and RNA. The team calls its invention the “transcriptor.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Bioinformatics Training
Scoop.it!

Bioinformatics dance: Is Bioinformatics really for everyone?

Bioinformatics dance: Is Bioinformatics really for everyone? | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
I would like to share some thoughts that came to my mind today, after a specific event having to do with bioinformatics training. First of all, don't get confused by the title of the post. It might sound like a selfish, elitistic or even ...

Via Pedro Fernandes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Genetically Modified Milk Cures Diarrhea, Could Save Millions Of Kids Annually

Genetically Modified Milk Cures Diarrhea, Could Save Millions Of Kids Annually | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Transgenic goats' milk modified to produce higher levels of the human antimicrobial protein lysozyme is effective in treating diarrhea in young pigs, proof-of-concept that food products from transgenic animals could also benefit human health.The...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New evidence that red wine component resveratrol activates SIRT1 pathway and prolongs life

New evidence that red wine component resveratrol activates SIRT1 pathway and prolongs life | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

A new study demonstrates what researchers consider conclusive evidence that the red wine compound resveratrol directly activates a protein that promotes health and longevity in animal models. What’s more, the researchers have uncovered the molecular mechanism for this interaction, and show that a class of more potent drugs currently in clinical trials act in a similar fashion. Pharmaceutical compounds similar to resveratrol may potentially treat and prevent diseases related to aging in people, the authors contend.

 

For the last decade, the science of aging has increasingly focused onsirtuins, a group of genes that are believed to protect many organisms, including mammals, against diseases of aging. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that resveratrol, a compound found in the skin of grapes as well as in peanuts and berries, increases the activity of a specific sirtuin, SIRT1, that protects the body from diseases by revving up the mitochondria, a kind of cellular battery that slowly runs down as we age. By recharging the batteries, SIRT1 can have profound effects on health.

 

Mice on resveratrol have twice the endurance and are relatively immune from effects of obesity and aging. In experiments with yeast, nematodes, bees, flies and mice, lifespan has been extended.

 

“In the history of pharmaceuticals, there has never been a drug that binds to a protein to make it run faster in the way that resveratrol activates SIRT1,” said David Sinclair, Harvard Medical School professor of genetics. “Almost all drugs either slow or block them.”

 

In 2006, Sinclair’s group published a study showing that resveratrol could extend the lifespan of mice, and the company Sirtris Pharmaceuticals, which was started by HMS researchers, was founded to make drugs more potent than resveratrol. Sinclair is a co-founder of Sirtris, a GlaxoSmithKline company, and remains a scientific advisor. Sirtris currently has a number of sirtuin-activating compounds in clinical trials.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Tony Barnes's curator insight, March 9, 2013 12:00 PM

I remember  in the 1970s there was talk of tocopherols having something this kind of health effect.  My chemistry's now rusty. Maybe resveratrol is a tocoperol. Anyway, it's very interesting.

Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Getting Genetics Done: Comparing Sequence Classification Algorithms for Metagenomics

Getting Genetics Done: Comparing Sequence Classification Algorithms for Metagenomics | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Metagenomics is the study of DNA collected from environmental samples (e.g., seawater, soil, acid mine drainage, the human gut, sputum, pus, etc.). While traditional microbial genomics typically means sequencing a pure cultured isolate, metagenomics involves taking a culture-free environmental sample and sequencing a single gene (e.g. the 16S rRNA gene), multiple marker genes, or shotgun sequencing everything in the sample in order to determine what's there.

A challenge in shotgun metagenomics analysis is the sequence classification problem: i.e., given a sequence, what's it's origin? I.e., did this sequence read come from E. coli or some other enteric bacteria? Note that sequence classification does not involve genome assembly - sequence classification is done on unassembled reads. If you could perfectly classify the origin of every sequence read in your sample, you would know exactly what organisms are in your environmental sample and how abundant each one is.

The solution to this problem isn't simply BLAST'ing every sequence read that comes off your HiSeq 2500 against NCBI nt/nr. The computational cost of this BLAST search would be many times more expensive than the sequencing itself. There are many algorithms for sequence classification. This paper examines a wide range of the available algorithms and software implementations for sequence classification as applied to metagenomic data.

more...
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, March 28, 2013 2:06 AM

it feels graet when all these methods converge on composition of microbiota in your data)_

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

NASA may have witnessed the birth of a black hole for the first time ever

NASA may have witnessed the birth of a black hole for the first time ever | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Black holes are created when a supernova explosion destroys a massive star. Scientists have discovered dozens of black holes, but all of them are already formed. So, when scientists recently saw different distorted remains of a supernova, they knew it something special.

 

What the scientists believe they observed was the infant phases of a black hole, or the youngest black hole ever recorded in the Milky Way galaxy.

Caught on film by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, the "remnant," or W49B, is seen as a vibrant swirl of blues, greens, yellows, and pinks. As seen from Earth, it is about 1,000-years-old and is located roughly 26,000 light years away. A typical black hole, like SS433, is thought to be between 17,000- and 21,000-years-old, as seen from Earth.

 

"W49B is the first of its kind to be discovered in the galaxy," Laura Lopez, who led a study on the remnant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said in a statement. "It appears its parent star ended its life in a way that most others don't."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
mdashf's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:01 AM

right when it was borne 

Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

NASA - Preparatory Test of Drilling on Mars Generates Rock Powder

NASA - Preparatory Test of Drilling on Mars Generates Rock Powder | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
In an activity called the "mini drill test," NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its drill to generate this ring of powdered rock for inspection in advance of the rover's first full drilling.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Mars had oxygen 4 Billion years ago, and was wet, warm and rusty long before Earth had oxygen

Mars had oxygen 4 Billion years ago, and was wet, warm and rusty long before Earth had oxygen | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Four billion years ago called, and they want their oxygen-rich atmosphere back, finds new research from Oxford University.

 

t all hinges on the differences between rocks that have traveled from Mars to Earth and rocks analyzed byNASA's Spirit Mars rover, a vintage robot that roamed the planet's surface from 2004 to 2010. The surface rocks examined by Spirit show more signs of oxidation than the Martian meteorites.

 

The meteorites are relatively young – between 180 million and 1.4 billion years old – compared to the surface rocks, which are thought to be 3.7 billion years old. The researchers believe that the surface rocks were drawn into the planet's interior through a process known as subduction, and then subsequently blasted back to the surface via volcanic eruptions. The meteorites, by contrast, originated from deeper inside the planet, and were therefore less affected by the atmospheric oxygen.

 

"As oxidation is what gives Mars its distinctive colour it is likely that the 'red planet' was wet, warm and rusty billions of years before Earth's atmosphere became oxygen rich," said Oxford professor and study co-author Bernard Wood, in press release.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Evidence that probiotics alter brain function

Evidence that probiotics alter brain function | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

In a discovery that carries significant implications for changing brain function through dietary interventions, UCLA researchers say they now have the first evidence that bacteria ingested in food can affect how the human brain works. The study, which focused on women who consumed yogurt containing the bacteria known as probiotics, appears in the journal Gastroenterology.

more...
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, June 3, 2013 12:54 AM

Well this MRI studies are easI misinterpreted however - it is still a step towards 

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New device can extract human DNA with full genetic data in minutes

New device can extract human DNA with full genetic data in minutes | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Take a swab of saliva from your mouth and within minutes your DNA could be ready for analysis and genome sequencing with the help of a new device.

 

University of Washington engineers and NanoFacture, a Bellevue, Wash., company, have created a device that can extract human DNA from fluid samples in a simpler, more efficient and environmentally friendly way than conventional methods.

 

The device will give hospitals and research labs a much easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis and forensic investigations.

 

“It’s very complex to extract DNA,” said Jae-Hyun Chung, a UW associate professor of mechanical engineering who led the research. “When you think of the current procedure, the equivalent is like collecting human hairs using a construction crane.”

 

This technology aims to clear those hurdles. The small, box-shaped kit now is ready for manufacturing, then eventual distribution to hospitals and clinics. NanoFacture, a UW spinout company, signed a contract with Korean manufacturer KNR Systems last month at aceremony in Olympia, Wash.

 

The UW, led by Chung, spearheaded the research and invention of the technology, and still manages the intellectual property. Separating DNA from bodily fluids is a cumbersome process that’s become a bottleneck as scientists make advances in genome sequencing, particularly for disease prevention and treatment. The market for DNA preparation alone is about $3 billion each year.

 

Conventional methods use a centrifuge to spin and separate DNA molecules or strain them from a fluid sample with a micro-filter, but these processes take 20 to 30 minutes to complete and can require excessive toxic chemicals.

 

UW engineers designed microscopic probes that dip into a fluid sample – saliva, sputum or blood – and apply an electric field within the liquid. That draws particles to concentrate around the surface of the tiny probe. Larger particles hit the tip and swerve away, but DNA-sized molecules stick to the probe and are trapped on the surface. It takes two or three minutes to separate and purify DNA using this technology.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Biosciencia's curator insight, May 15, 2013 7:25 AM

The device will give hospitals and research labs a much easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis and forensic investigations.

Linda Coburn's comment, May 15, 2013 11:28 AM
It bothers me that an American university which receives American tax dollars for funding has decided to contract with a Korean company to manufacture this amazing device. We will never solve our economic woes if we don't bring mfg back to the US.
Center for Accessible Living NKY's curator insight, May 15, 2013 5:29 PM

This should make obtaining genetic diagnosis much easier and faster.

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Researchers Map the 3D Structure of the Telomerase Enzyme

Researchers Map the 3D Structure of the Telomerase Enzyme | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
Researchers from UCLA and UC Berkeley have, for the first time ever, solved the puzzle of how the various components of an entire telomerase enzyme complex fit together and function in a three-dimensional structure.

 

The telomerase enzyme, which is known to play a significant role in aging and most cancers, represents a breakthrough that could open up a host of new approaches to fighting disease.

 

The creation of the first complete visual map of thetelomerase enzyme, which is known to play a significant role in aging and most cancers, represents a breakthrough that could open up a host of new approaches to fighting disease, the researchers said.

"Everyone in the field wants to know what telomerase looks like, and there it was. I was so excited, I could hardly breathe," said Juli Feigon, a UCLA professor of chemistry and biochemistry and a senior author of the study. "We were the first to see it."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Bacteria selectively accelerate their own evolution by replication

Bacteria selectively accelerate their own evolution by replication | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Several mechanisms that increase the rate of mutagenesis across the entire genome have been identified; however, how the rate of evolution might be promoted in individual genes is unclear. Most genes in bacteria are encoded on the leading strand of replication. This presumably avoids the potentially detrimental head-on collisions that occur between the replication and transcription machineries when genes are encoded on the lagging strand.

 

A new study now describes the ubiquitous (core) genes in Bacillus subtilis and determine that 17% of them are on the lagging strand. The scientists find a higher rate of point mutations in the core genes on the lagging strand compared with those on the leading strand, with this difference being primarily in the amino-acid-changing (nonsynonymous) mutations. They determine that, overall, the genes under strong negative selection against amino-acid-changing mutations tend to be on the leading strand, co-oriented with replication. In contrast, on the basis of the rate of convergent mutations, genes under positive selection for amino-acid-changing mutations are more commonly found on the lagging strand, indicating faster adaptive evolution in many genes in the head-on orientation. Increased gene length and gene expression amounts are positively correlated with the rate of accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations in the head-on genes, suggesting that the conflict between replication and transcription could be a driving force behind these mutations. Indeed, using reversion assays, the scientists show that the difference in the rate of mutagenesis of genes in the two orientations is transcription dependent. Altogether, their findings indicate that head-on replication–transcription conflicts are more mutagenic than co-directional conflicts and that these encounters can significantly increase adaptive structural variation in the coded proteins. The researchers propose that bacteria, and potentially other organisms, promote faster evolution of specific genes through orientation-dependent encounters between DNA replication and transcription.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, April 22, 2013 1:15 PM

Video is amasing!!!

Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

How New Bioinformatics Tools Are Honing the View of Cancer Genomes | New York Genome Center

How New Bioinformatics Tools Are Honing the View of Cancer Genomes | New York Genome Center | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
more...
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, March 28, 2013 1:48 AM

a lto of data was used an starting point and a lot for validation - makes sense to try this one in somatic mutation search 

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Whole brain cellular-level activity mapping in one second

Whole brain cellular-level activity mapping in one second | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Neuroscientists at Howard Hughes Medical Institute have mapped the activity of nearly all the neurons in a vertebrate brain at cellular resolution, with signficant implications for neuroscience research and projects like the proposed Brain Activity Map (BAM).

 

Fast volumetric imaging of the larval zebrafish brain with light-sheet microscopy (credit: Misha B Ahrens, Philipp J Keller/Nature Methods)

The researchers used high-speed light sheet microscopy to image the activity of 80% of the neurons in the brain (which is composed of ~100,000 neurons) of a fish larva at 0.8 Hz (an image every 1.3 seconds), with single-cell resolution.

 

This represents the first technology that achieves whole brain imaging of a vertebrate brain at cellular resolution with speeds that approximate neural activity patterns and behavior, as Nature Methodsmethagora blog noted.

The authors saw correlated activity patterns at the cellular level that spanned large areas of the brain — pointing to the existence of broadly distributed functional circuits.

 

The next steps will be to determine the causal role that these circuits play in behavior — something that will require improvements in the methods for 3D optogenetics, the blog said. Obtaining the detailed anatomical map of these circuits will also be key to understand the brain’s organization at its deepest level.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

De-Extinction: Can Cloning Bring Extinct Species Back to Life?

De-Extinction: Can Cloning Bring Extinct Species Back to Life? | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

At some point in the next decade, if advances in biotechnology continue on their current path, clones of extinct species such as the passenger pigeon, Tasmanian tiger and wooly mammoth could once again live among us. But cloning lost species—or “de-extinction” as some scientists call it—presents us with myriad ethical, legal and regulatory questions that must be answered, such as which (if any) species should be brought back and whether or not such creatures could be allowed to return to the wild. Such questions are set to be addressed at the TEDx DeExtinction conference, a day-long event in Washington, D.C., organized by Stewart Brand’s Revive & Restore project. Brand previewed the topics for discussion last week at the TED2013 conference in Long Beach, Calif.

 

Scientists are actively working on methods and procedures for bringing extinct species back to life, says Ryan Phelan, executive director of Revive & Restore and co-organizer of the TEDx event. “The technology is moving fast. What Stewart and I are trying to do with this meeting is for the first time to allow the public to start thinking about this. We’re going to hear from people who take it quite seriously. De-extinction is going to happen, and the questions are how does it get applied, when does it get used, what are the criteria which are going to be set?”

 

Cloning extinct species has been tried before—with moderate success. An extinct Pyrenean ibex, or bucardo, (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica) was born to a surrogate mother goat in 2009, nine years after the last member of its species was killed by a falling tree. The cloned animal lived for just seven minutes. Revive & Restore itself has launched a project to try to resurrect the passenger pigeon, which went extinct in 1914.

 

More: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/03/passenger-pigeon-de-extinction/


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Peter Phillips's curator insight, March 15, 2013 4:28 PM

The release of the Monash University team's progress emplanting DNA from an extinct gastric brooder frog is an example of this... and also of how competetive research is... they decided to publish in a newspaper... traditionally a shortcut to fame when many people are about to discover the same thing. Good luck to all however, who work to maintain and reinstate the diversity of life on our planet, and congratulations for the dogged detective work!

Eduardo Carriazo's curator insight, May 15, 9:14 AM

I chose this article because it has good information and if I was someone studying this I would use this source. I also choose this article because it changed my mind about de - extinction. If you can do it, you should do it.

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

100 Incredible Lectures from the World's Top Scientists - Best Colleges Online

100 Incredible Lectures from the World's Top Scientists - Best Colleges Online | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Unless you’re enrolled at one of the best online colleges or are an elite member of the science and engineering inner circle, you’re probably left out of most of the exciting research explored by the world’s greatest scientists.

 

But thanks to the Internet and the generosity of many universities and online colleges, you’ve now got access to the cutting edge theories and projects that are changing the world in this list below.

 

If you’re looking for even more amazing lectures, check out our updated list for 2012 with more talks from great minds.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Hacer Sezer's curator insight, March 11, 2013 12:38 PM

International education will be more economical for the foreign students as the online education spreads around the world and fortified with accreditation issue.

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, March 28, 2013 2:03 AM

Wanna sturt learning now? This is a goof point)

Rescooped by Pedro Barbosa from Science-Videos
Scoop.it!

NASA: Fiery plasma rain on the surface of the sun

NASA: Fiery plasma rain on the surface of the sun | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced all three. A moderately powerful solar flare exploded on the sun's lower right limb, sending out light and radiation. Next came a CME, which shot off to the right out into space. And then, the sun treated viewers to one of its dazzling magnetic displays – a phenomenon known as coronal rain.

 

Over the course of the next day, hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, themselves, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, which highlights material at a temperature of about 50,000 Kelvin. This plasma acts as a tracer, helping scientists watch the dance of magnetic fields on the sun, outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

 

The footage in this video was collected by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument. SDO collected one frame every 12 seconds, and the movie plays at 30 frames per second, so each second in this video corresponds to six minutes of real time. The video covers 12:30 a.m. EDT to 10:00 p.m. EDT on July 19, 2012.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pedro Barbosa
Scoop.it!

Finally confirmed: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs | ExtremeTech

Finally confirmed: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs | ExtremeTech | Innovation and Science breakthroughs | Scoop.it
A team of American and European researchers have confirmed that the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction -- the event that wiped out roughly 75% of the planet's species, including almost every dinosaur -- was caused by an asteroid impact in Mexico 66...
more...
No comment yet.