Pedalogica: educación y TIC
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Pedalogica: educación y TIC
Pedalogica: educación y TIC
TIC, educación y otros cuentos...
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Rescooped by Alazne González from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Connecting Students and Teachers for Better Learning

Connecting Students and Teachers for Better Learning | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it
Research demonstrates that a sense of social connection can improve learning. In fact, activities that bring students together — like peer tutoring and cooperative learning — have shown a marked increase of up to 75% greater performance on assessments. Teachers who support student-centered learning in this way often make a bigger impact on students’ lives and education than teachers who remain aloof or apart from their students.

A sense of separation from a teacher (and other students) can happen pretty easily in an online environment. It can take a special effort on the part of online teachers to become a “favorite teacher”. David Wiley noted that the impersonal nature of the web is not only easy to slip into, it is sometimes designed into the way LMSs direct pedagogy:

“With the pile of philosophical, conceptual, and empirical evidence showing the social nature of learning and the importance of human relationships (particularly the relationship between teacher and student) in learning and wellbeing, why are we working so hard to automate away any opportunity for these relationships to exist?”

But the truth is that there are a myriad of ways that teachers and students can create digital connections in online classes. A new paper from the Research and Education Department — “Increased Social Connectedness through Digital Peer Learning” — explores several ways that Canvas supports social learning, including:

Peer Tutoring
Reciprocal Teaching
Cooperative Learning

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 26, 2015 6:24 AM

Research demonstrates that a sense of social connection can improve learning. In fact, activities that bring students together — like peer tutoring and cooperative learning — have shown a marked increase of up to 75% greater performance on assessments. Teachers who support student-centered learning in this way often make a bigger impact on students’ lives and education than teachers who remain aloof or apart from their students.

A sense of separation from a teacher (and other students) can happen pretty easily in an online environment. It can take a special effort on the part of online teachers to become a “favorite teacher”. David Wiley noted that the impersonal nature of the web is not only easy to slip into, it is sometimes designed into the way LMSs direct pedagogy:

“With the pile of philosophical, conceptual, and empirical evidence showing the social nature of learning and the importance of human relationships (particularly the relationship between teacher and student) in learning and wellbeing, why are we working so hard to automate away any opportunity for these relationships to exist?”

But the truth is that there are a myriad of ways that teachers and students can create digital connections in online classes. A new paper from the Research and Education Department — “Increased Social Connectedness through Digital Peer Learning” — explores several ways that Canvas supports social learning, including:

Peer Tutoring
Reciprocal Teaching
Cooperative Learning



Rescooped by Alazne González from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
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How Mindful Children React Differently to Challenges (Illustrated)

How Mindful Children React Differently to Challenges (Illustrated) | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it

One thing I know from my work is that mindful children react differently to challenges. To show you exactly what I mean, I've created a few illustrations....


Via Jenny Ebermann, Ivon Prefontaine, Luciana Viter, juandoming
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 19, 2014 8:03 PM

This would be helpful in classrooms.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Alazne González from Social Media and its influence
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4 things you need to know to help your students manage their online reputation [Infographic]

4 things you need to know to help your students manage their online reputation [Infographic] | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it

 

We often hear complaints about what students say and do online, but we often neglect to look into educators helping them manage their online reputation. This infographic is geared toward adults, but it can serve as a great starting point for conversations and activities that educators can engage in with students to help them to establish an active digital footprint that represents who they want to be perceived as online.

 


Via Made Hery Santosa, Gust MEES
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Rescooped by Alazne González from UDL & ICT in education
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Mobile Studying & Online Flashcards on Smartphones

Mobile Studying & Online Flashcards on Smartphones | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it

Students use smartphones to study more, and more efficiently.


Via Gust MEES, Smaragda Papadopoulou
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Rescooped by Alazne González from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups | LEARNing To LEARN | eSkills

6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups | LEARNing To LEARN | eSkills | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it
Grouping students is easy; creating effective student groups is less so.

The following infographic from Mia MacMeekin seeks to provide some ideas to help make group work easier in your classroom. The strength of this particular graphic is in the range of the ideas. The first tip refers teachers to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal development, which frames student ability in terms of a range: what they can do unassisted, what they can do with the support of a More Knowledgeable Other (MKO), and what they cannot do even with support. This is different for each student, and understanding these ranges for students can help inform grouping decisions, whether you’re using a peer instruction model, ability grouping, or another approach.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/



Via John Evans, Gust MEES
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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 27, 2015 7:14 AM

Facilitando el trabajo en el aula...6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | @scoopit via @joevans http://sco.lt/...

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, August 28, 2015 5:40 PM

This is a great info graphic, but I would also add the importance of praising effort.

Jess's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:25 PM

I choose this resource because it provide ways to group students effectively.

Rescooped by Alazne González from Contenidos educativos digitales
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Silvan Pan Morel
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

Rescooped by Alazne González from Educational Boards (Pinterest & Visual.ly)
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Online Students vs. Traditional Students | Visual.ly

Online Students vs. Traditional Students | Visual.ly | Pedalogica: educación y TIC | Scoop.it
This infographic compares the benefits of getting a degree online or getting a degree as a traditional students.

Via EduClick_España
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