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Learning with 'e's: What makes an inspirational teacher?

Mikko Hakala's insight:

What makes an inspirational teacher? The students say:

- Enthusiasm and passion for the subject.

- They bring the students back on track, encourage to not give up.

- Give constructive, forward looking feedback.

- Offer help outside formal context, give support and advice.

- Use captivating teaching methods.

Short and good blog post by Steve Wheeler.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 7, 2014 11:12 PM

Teaching is important in student learning. Too often, we treat teaching as irrelevant and as something we can simply treat as theoretical. People who have not taught, others who left the classroom years ago, and some who never wanted to be in the classroom offer insights into something they know little about. The result is teaching is often treated as irrelevant and something that can be talked about in some virtual manner.

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Emerging Perspectives on Learning, Teaching and Technology

Emerging Perspectives on Learning, Teaching and Technology | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Nice wikipage covering many topics:

 

1) Learning and Cognitive Theories

2) Learner-Centered Theories
3) Inquiry Strategies: Tasks
4) Inquiry Strategies: Changing Learners' Minds
5) Tools for Teaching and Learning: Changing or Encouraging Human Behaviors
6) Tools for Teaching and Learning: Technology Tools
7) Socially Oriented Theories
8) Direct Instruction Strategies

 

Good web resource and reference material.

 

 

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Dean Mantz's curator insight, April 30, 2014 9:45 AM

Thanks to Ana Cristina Pratas for sharing this resource.  I found the site provided a wealth of resources addressing education theories such as learning and cognitive, learner centered, and inquiry strategies.  I will definitely be sharing this site with my preservice students. 

Thomas Salmon's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:59 PM

A free book covering learning theory useful for applications in higher education. And it is a wiki. Win :)

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:44 PM

This looks like a very detailed table of contents to considerable theory.

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Verkkokirjoittamisen pikaopas

Verkkokirjoittamisen pikaopas | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Nopealukuinen opas verkkokirjoittamiseen. Opi 55 verkkokirjoittamisen käytäntöä, joilla tekstit saa houkutteleviksi ja löytymään hakukoneilla.

Via Jaana Nyström
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Hyödyllinen opas.

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Jaana Nyström's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:37 AM

Google+:sta löydettyä!

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My top 5 on why learning - Mark Anderson's Blog

My top 5 on why learning - Mark Anderson's Blog | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
education, learning & technology
Mikko Hakala's insight:

It is learning that is at the heart of teaching. Here are 5 great reflections on learning from Mark Anderson, @ICTEvangelist - from being a role model to personal development.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 22, 2014 11:00 PM

We need to show our major stakeholders we can improve learning. That is interesting, but I do not see that eduction consists of major stakeholders. The people we need to focus on our students.

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What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say

What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say
Mikko Hakala's insight:
Excellent post on deeper learning. It's not only about students 'getting the point'.
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Marta Torán's curator insight, April 21, 2014 2:55 PM

Me ha encantado!

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This is How to Use Google Docs to Create Backchannels and Exit Tickets ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

This is How to Use Google Docs to Create Backchannels and Exit Tickets ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Mikko Hakala's insight:

This article has a brief discussion and a video how to set up Google Docs for backchannels and exit tickets.

 

Backchannels in education, activities and events have a lot of benefits, see for example: http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-and-students-should-backchannel/

 

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2014 Session Schedule - Edcamp Elon

2014 Session Schedule - Edcamp Elon | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Information about Edcamp Elon. Follow #edcampelon to join the conversation.
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Great set of ideas, tips and discussions shared for many kinds of educational topics in these collaborative notes.

 

via @web20classroom

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Web 2.0 Tools


Via GSeremetakis, McSotos, Elena Elliniadou
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Hundreds of important, categorized links on one page. Great resource.

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McSotos's curator insight, April 12, 2014 2:27 PM

Για να περάσουμε  δημιουργικά τις διακοπές του Πάσχα

Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 14, 2014 1:00 AM

lots and lots of good stuff here.

 

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The 5 Best Cloud Storage Apps for Teachers and Students

The 5 Best Cloud Storage Apps for Teachers and Students | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Dropbox, Google Drive, Box, Copy, One Drive


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Google Drive with its many functionalities works now the best for me. For example collaboration on documents is very smooth, think about many combinations: teacher-student, student-student, supervisor-supervisee...  

 

More ideas here:

http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2012/04/04/52-great-google-docs-secrets-for-students/

 

The post has also links to the iPad and Android apps.  

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Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class?

Jacobs Physics: Is there any point at all in talking in front of the class? | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"In my 9th grade conceptual classes, I've done less and less talking as time's gone on.  And I've actually seen improvement in test, quiz, and homework performance..."

Mikko Hakala's insight:

Some disturbingly interesting issues in this post. What's the point of teacher talking?

 

What the teacher can do instead of lecturing:

1. Lead a brief discussion on the facts (that are given in a document to a student)

2. Lead interactive discussion on homework problems

3. Explain the answers to a daily quiz

4. Students grade each others tests. Teacher explains the rubric

5. Answer to some brief questions from students

6. When students solve problems, teacher checks every single part of their solution before they can move on

 

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Avoiding the Trap of "Q A Teaching"

Avoiding the Trap of "Q  A Teaching" | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Petra Claflin, Digital Media Manager for YES Prep Public Schools, identifies the problem of 'Q&A teaching' and offers five tips for teachers to examine and improve their modeling and direct instruction practice.

Via Luciana Viter
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Great, practical insight on the problems of "Q&A teaching".

 

In the Q&A situation, teacher's questions may come too early (during the time the students still expect teacher's clear eplanation). In other words, students are requested to contribute before they are ready. Moreover, unplanned Q&A conversations may lead to time problems. 

 

Five ideas are given to avoid the problem. The first one may be the most important: the students should know your intention (e.g. that they will be tested at the end).

 

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Grading and assessment

Grading and assessment | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Important points that question the deep meaning of grading and assessment.

 

On grading

http://www.justintarte.com/2014/03/10-thoughts-on-grading-and-assessment.html

 

Point and purpose of the assessment

http://www.justintarte.com/2014/03/10-questions-to-ask-yourself-before.html

 

 

Image by Sage Ross, Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves

Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Content curation in the classroom.

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Audrey's curator insight, March 21, 2014 7:30 PM

Curating is about finding and selecting information in order to learn about a subject. Youngsters can be encouraged to do this  pre-school.  This motivational 21st century skill can be encouraged at home. with educational games toys and and books which stimulates interest.  For example children can learn about  science by interacting with Chemistry Lab; Horrible Science - explosive experiments; Newton's Cradle and Science Museum.  By the time they get to school they are already full of curiosity and ready to increase their knowledge.  Audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:27 AM

By Robin Good,

Here's a short first-hand report highlighting how an 8th grade social studies class teacher (Terri Inloes) has fully leveraged the content curation potential to let her students dive, discover and make sense of topics (in this case social reform movements) that they had not studied before. All by themselves.


Here the steps taken to make this happen:


a) By using the Question Formulation Technique, the teacher prepared pairs of photographs representing each of the reform movements, one picture dating back to the late 19th century, and another representing where that social reform movement stands in today’s society. 


b) After checking out all of the photos, students settled on the pair of pictures that most caught their interest.


c) They brainstormed and refined a set of specific questions, and then shared their thinking with the class. 

d) With the feedback received they selected the topic which they would curate. 

e) At this point students planned their research strategies. By using 5 different graphic organizers from the book Q Tasks, by Carol Koechlin and Sandi Zwaan, students were allowed to choose the one that they thought would help them the most in planning their keyword search strategies. 


f) Students were assigned WordPress blogs and provided basic instructions on how to use them to 

curate and publish their research work.


g) Discovery and real learning kicked in as students proceeded in collaborative groups to research and document their chosen topic. 


You can see some of the outcomes that this assignment produced right here:


General Conclusions

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/2014/02/24/conclusion-3/


Voting Rights Inequality

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/


Mental Health Treatment
http://tmsorangementalhealthcaretreatments.d20blogs.org/


Prohibition Acts

http://tmsorangeprohibitionacts.d20blogs.org/ 

 



A very inspiring example of content curation can be effectively applied in the classroom with impressive results. 


Highly recommended. 9/10


Thanks to Nancy White of Innovations in Education for participating, writing and reporting about it.

 Thanks to Robin Good for the fine summary in this insight.
The ideas here offer a great classroom challenge to students.{Monica}
Glenda Morris's curator insight, April 8, 2014 2:57 PM

Important 21st century skills

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For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
If our students look at the work we’re asking them to do today and say “It doesn’t matter,” we’re missing a huge opportunity to help them become the learners they now need to be.

Via Grant Montgomery, The Rice Process
Mikko Hakala's insight:

A good post to provoke teachers think critically what they ask the students to do. How can the students do "work that matters"? That is, meaningful tasks that have potentially a wide audience and that reflect students' own interests.

 

In the traditional way, the student's "assignments" (exams, exercises, projects) are passed to the teacher for a grade, or in a little more advanced situations, to peers for review. Are these felt as "work that matters"? There have been of course plenty of opportunities to design meaningful tasks, but now access to web (global connections, collaboration, sharing) allows to amplify the audience and potential for real-world applications. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:12 PM

It is important to note the article author, Will Richardson, points out that students who accomplish innovative things i.e. publishing book and inventions are outliers. It does not mean learning in school should not be meaningful. It means the opposite.

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Tips for Public Speaking

Tips for Public Speaking | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Public Speaking things

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Do you want to be a better public speaker? Here is a nicely comprehensive guide on five 'slides', with links to great tips on each of them.

 

1) Planning your talk

2) Designing the slides

3) Preparing

4) Delivering the talk

5) Reflecting after the event

 

You'll find discussions on issues like outlining your talk, how many slides to have, how to deal with nervousness etc. 

 

It's a well-structured, entertaining guide to become "an accomplished public speaker".

 

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Bob Irving's curator insight, April 28, 2014 8:51 AM

I'm one of the few who actually enjoys speaking in public. Some great tips here.

Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 30, 2014 4:41 AM

Good advice and tips for improving presentations. 

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6 Myths of Digital Technology

6 Myths of Digital Technology | Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"To summarise their findings, as I’ve mentioned before, it’s not about technology, it’s about pedagogy. They also state very clearly that  ”the use of technology needs to be informed by context and research“."

 

 


Via Fishtree Education
Mikko Hakala's insight:

The six myths of digital technology in education are presented and commented in this post from Mark Anderson, @ICTEvangelist:

 

1) Importance of introducing a (yet another) new technology to improve learning.

2) Childern as digital natives.

3) Not needing to know stuff, more important is to know where to find it.

4) Students are motivated by technology, so they learn better when using it.

5) Must use technology because it's there.

6) More is better.

 

The original text on which the article is based:

http://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/uploads/pdf/The_Impact_of_Digital_Technology_on_Learning_-_Executive_Summary_(2012).pdf

 

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Open-source educational quizzes aim to teach without the teacher

Open-source educational quizzes aim to teach without the teacher | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Oppia is an open-source platform from Google that lets anyone create interactive online learning activities that give feedback at every step.
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Short article on the essentials of Oppia - a free tool to create interactive learning experiences. 

 

"Oppia - Bite-sized learning journeys, by anyone and for everyone" https://www.oppia.org/

 

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Traditional Education Is Like Arranged Marriage

Traditional Education Is Like Arranged Marriage | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I have a theory that arranged marriages actually work relatively well if certain conditions are met: The society must be very supportive of the arranged marriage, almost pressuring the couple to ma...
Mikko Hakala's insight:
Interesting thoughts and analogies in this blog post about the nature of traditional education. 'The worry of freedom' via @janhjensen
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The Beautiful Versatility of Hyperlinks

The Beautiful Versatility of Hyperlinks | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
You undoubtedly used a hyperlink to get to this post. You’re so used to them that the instinct to click or tap on blue, underlined text can probably drive you to distraction. Students work the same...
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Encouraging hyperlinking in students' written essays.

 

A useful article reminding that hyperlinking is an underutilized technique in students' written assignments. It discusses briefly 5 ways how hyperlinking could be integrated in the electronic documents.   

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A bright idea for responding when kids say “I don’t know” -

A bright idea for responding when kids say “I don’t know” - | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Sometimes an “I don’t know” comes from a child waving his or hand wildly, desperate to be called on, only to be at a loss for words once acknowledged. Sometimes you hear “I don’t know” because the child is shy, embarrassed to talk, or unsure of the answer. And sometimes “I don’t know” is said …
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Practical hints for classroom. What strategies can be used when the student says "I don't know" ? Giving thinking time can work (or think-pair-share approach), but the article gives some new suggestions to help the student respond.

 

Good practical advice. 

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Teaching Students to Fail

Teaching Students to Fail | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Teaching students to fail gives essential character while it changes a classroom to a more participatory, less fear-driven culture. Optimism can be taught.

Via Suvi Salo
Mikko Hakala's insight:

The article discusses failures and how students can learn resilience and optimism. Three dimensions:

 

1) Teachers should pay attention to character education (non-cognitive skills). Optimism can be learned, for example by enouraging flexible thinking. In short, input from positive psychology should be implemented.

 

2) Gamification, if successfully integrated, can produce failure-resilence. 

 

3) Teachers sharing personal stories of failures and joys of overcoming them. Role playing.  

 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 12, 2014 6:09 PM

An important consideration is that "grit" is not just for learning, but for life in its broader context. Grit as a tool for succeeding in school is healthy when connected more broadly to life.

PhotoFunMasti's comment, April 13, 2014 2:50 AM
PhotoFunMasti
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5 Free Social Bookmarking Tools I Use Every Day - Edudemic

5 Free Social Bookmarking Tools I Use Every Day - Edudemic | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Most people I talk to have some sort of what might best be called an online routine. You know, the when and how of approaching what you need and want to see on the web each day. Personally, I take a scroll through my email, a few social media sites, and a couple of news …

Via John Evans, Rod Murray
Mikko Hakala's insight:

List of useful tools for online routines (storing, classifying, sharing and curating information). Own experience on these tools:

 

Evernote - The best tool for storing online information and links. A super useful feature is that a page can be sent to Evernote by sharing via email. Easy to arrange the notes into subfolders, to add keywords. In everyday use. 

 

Delicious - Save quickly a link. Own tweets are also saved for easy browsing.  

 

Diigo - Store quickly a link into a public or private subfolder, add keywords.

 

Scoop.it - For curating, not really for bookmarking.

 

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Jämsän ammattiopiskelijat tekivät itselleen matematiikan oppikirjan

Jämsän ammattiopiskelijat tekivät itselleen matematiikan oppikirjan | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Nuoriso- ja vapaa-ajan ohjaajille ei ollut olemassa omaa oppikirjaa, joten opiskelijat keksivät tehdä sellaisen itse. Oppikirjan laskutehtävät kytkeytyvät käytäntöön.

Via Anne Rongas, Simon Hansell, Aki Puustinen
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Tässä on kyllä pointtia.

"Kirja onkin laadittu sen perusteella millaista tietoa ja taitoa opiskelijat arvioivat tarvitsevansa."

 

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Two Things Every Student Should Know about Google Scholar

Two Things Every Student Should Know about Google Scholar | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
"Google Scholar has a wealth of resources that are not usually available through several search engines including Google itself. Google scholar is geared towards scholarly and academic content like peer-reviewed journal articles, dissertations, theses and many more.As such, Google Scholar is an essential element in students learning toolkit. Besides being a search engine for scholarly content, Google Scholar also provides a host of other great features to help students in their research. Below are two important tips students can use with Google Scholar, check out this post for more tips.
Via Dennis Richards
Mikko Hakala's insight:

 

Two useful hints how to utilize Google Scholar, clearly explained:

1) Create alerts around a search topic, get notifications by e-mail

2) Build My library for articles and links

 

Nine more hints here:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/04/9-tips-every-teacher-should-know-about.html

1) Refine keywords in search

2) Search articles by author

3) Refine publications by name and date

4) Search legal documents

5) Manage bibliography (to import citations to BibTeX, EndNote etc.)

6) Enable library access (by adding campus library to Google Scholar)

7) Create alerts (as above)

8) Use metrics to summarize citations to publications

9) Check citations to your articles 

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Want to learn quicker? Use your body

Want to learn quicker? Use your body | Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Waving your arms, wriggling your fingers and striding around a room can help you learn faster, says Colin Barras. How does it work?

Via Suvi Salo
Mikko Hakala's insight:

Discussion how gesturing and moving around in the class (by teacher, by student) might be connected to learning. 

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