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TEDxGlasgow - Donald Clark - More pedagogic change in 10 years than last 1000 years

Search, links, media sharing, social media, Wikipedia, games, open source etc. are ground breaking shifts in the way we learn, says Donald Clark. Unfortunate...

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Anne Whaits's curator insight, March 7, 2013 1:12 PM

The real scalibility in education comes with the Internet....freeing education from a place and from a specific time. With this comes changing pedagogies including peer-learning. Donald makes a case for recording lectures - videos provide opportunity for repeated access to new content. Some familiar messages here and interesting focus on scalibility.

Pedagogy and Research Theory
Research based theory and teaching pedagogy
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Teach teachers how to create magic

Teach teachers how to create magic | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
What do rap shows, barbershop banter and Sunday services have in common? As Christopher Emdin says, they all hold the secret magic to enthrall and teach at the same time — and it’s a skill we often don't teach to educators. The science advocate (and cofounder of Science Genius B.A.T.T.L.E.S. with the GZA of the Wu-Tang Clan) offers a vision to make the classroom come alive.

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María Elena López's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 AM

Si el docente sabe CREAR magia sus alumnos nunca se aburren y descubren el placer de aprender siempre.

Elizabeth Alfaro's curator insight, April 14, 9:43 AM

MAgic can be Taught

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, April 15, 6:52 PM

Great TED talk!

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Engage Students (and Entertain Them a Little, too!)

By Michael F. Opitz, Michael P. Ford “I am not here to entertain students. I am here to teach them to learn specific content and skills,” commented a teacher in a workshop we were conducting. Imagine her surprise when we agreed with her! In our research on motivation and engagement, which led to creating our joyful learning framework, we discovered that the terms engagement and entertainment are often used synonymously when they are anything but alike. In this brief blog post, we point out the differences and provide some student engagement suggestions. We are drawing these thoughts from our most recent work, Engaging Minds in the Classroom: The Surprising Power of Joy. What is Engagement? Wlodkowski and Ginsberg (1995) defined engagement as the visible outcome of motivation, the natural capacity to direct energy in the pursuit of a goal. It usually happens when learners can sense success is within their reach, they value the outcome of the learning experience, and they feel safe in the classroom setting (Brophy, 2008). Attentive, committed, persistent, and meaning seekers are four characteristics of engaged learners (Schlecty, 2011). During a whole group lesson, a teacher would look for attentive students who are focused on completing a given task and persist if the task becomes difficult because they value what they are doing and derive meaning from it. One sure way to double-check these observations is to talk with students as they complete their work and listen to what they have to say about it. Engaged students might make comments such as “I am having trouble understanding this section but I really want to know about how gravity works. I think I need to look at more of the diagrams to help me understand.” So What Is Entertainment? The difference between entertainment and engagement is clear if we just think about the two words. We know that entertaining students is fairly easy (remember the Friday afternoon video?). As Katz and Chard (2000) remind us, engagement involves getting students interested in the word around them. If students become interested in their world, they will always be able to find something that interests them in their lives. Engagement draws us into our daily lives, whereas entertainment does the opposite; we seek it out to distract us from our daily lives. It diverts us from attending to important matters. In the end, entertainment is fairly fleeting and short-lived. So why make the distinction between these two terms? As educators, our job is to engage students rather than entertain them. We get them engaged by providing tasks that enable them to be attentive, committed, and persistent learners who strive to understand what they are learning, which leads to sustainable and longer-lasting pleasure than when they are entertained. Engaged students and teachers derive joy and pleasure from what they do; they do not need to be entertained (Schlecty, 2011). So What Does This Mean For Educators? While we emphasize the importance of engagement over entertainment, we also recognize that a bit of entertainment can lead students to  engagement. In these instances, we want to use entertainment. For example, we might decide to dress up as a historical figure to engage students in learning about that figure. Or we might use a humorous story to entice students to learn content. We fully recognize that having fun allows students to build social relationships. Rather than seeing engagement and entertainment as an “either/or” issue, we suggest using both in purposeful ways to gain a full understanding of  how engagement and entertainment contribute to the larger picture. Entertainment becomes a means rather than the end. Using props, humor, and other activities that students find fun in purposeful and meaningful ways can lead to engaged students. Engaged students are more joyful in their learning pursuits. As a result, their learning is learning with staying power. In essence, joy leads students to learning rather than away from it. References Brophy, J. (2008). Developing students’ appreciation for what is taught in school. Educational Psychologist, 43, 132–141. Katz, L. G., & Chard, S. C. (2000). Engaging children’s minds: The project approach (2nd ed.). Stamford, CT: Ablex. Opitz, M., and Ford, M. (2014). Engaging minds in the classroom: The surprising power of joy. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Schlecty, P. C. (2011). Engaging students: The next level of working on the work. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Wlodkowski, R. J., & Ginsberg, M. B. (1995). Diversity and motivation: Culturally responsive teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory v5, Organisation Kolb, Psychology Vygotsky, Psychology Bloom, Piaget genetic epistemology, Psychology Skinner, Montessori constructivism, Dewey constructivism, radical constructivism Knowledge as mental representation: 1a. Knowledge is not passively received either through the senses or by way of communication; 1b. Knowledge is actively built up by the cognising subject; 2a. The function of cognition is adaptive, in the biological sense of the term, tending towards fit or viability; 2b Cognition serves the subject’s organization of the experiential world, not the discovery of an objective ontological reality., social constructivism connectivism, Taylor Organisation, Holt homeschooling, unschooling, constructivism radical constructivism, Kolb experiental learning, Montessori Montessori education, Social anthropology Lave & Wenger, Vygotsky zone of proximal development, Lave & Wenger situated learning, Education Illich, scientific pedagogy Education based on science that modified and improved the individual., communities of practice Groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:37 AM
Learning theories
Bookmarking Librarian's curator insight, April 2, 6:35 PM

Learning theories

JulieLaRoche's curator insight, April 12, 11:00 AM

I love infographics like this that depict the 10,000 foot view to show the overall subject, the various theories or parts, and how the pieces fit together and influence one another.

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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

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A Presentation Isn't Always the Right Way to Communicate

A Presentation Isn't Always the Right Way to Communicate | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Sometimes you just need to start a conversation.

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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, March 19, 9:06 AM

Duarte suggests we ask these questions:  "What you want to get out of the time you have with the group. Do you need to simultaneously inform, entertain, and persuade your audience to adopt a line of thinking or to take action? Or do you need to gather more information, have a discussion, or drive the group toward consensus to get to your desired next step?"

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Engagement in Australian Schools -Background Paper


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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, March 16, 6:27 PM

Student engagement project in Australian schools by @AITSL

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 17, 2:12 AM
Engagement in Australian Schools -Background Paper
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Learning Live: Sir Ken Robinson - Introduction - YouTube

Part 1 of 5 On 2 July at 4PM BST, Sir Michael Barber, Pearson's Chief Education Advisor interviewed Sir Ken Robinson, and discussed whether creativity is bei...
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IQ Matrix — Home of 250+ Self-Growth Mind Maps

IQ Matrix — Home of 250+ Self-Growth Mind Maps | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
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How can we improve education? @joannelipman says we need to go old-school

How can we improve education? @joannelipman says we need to go old-school | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Joanne Lipman writes that today's educators are too soft. It is time to go back to the discipline of the past.
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The 8 Essential Elements of Project Based Learning

The 8 Essential Elements of Project Based Learning | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it

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Ken Robinson On The Principles Of Creative Leadership | Fast Company

Ken Robinson On The Principles Of Creative Leadership | Fast Company | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it

Ken Robinson On The Principles Of Creative Leadership http://zite.to/nhO0Hg via @zite...


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 10, 6:43 PM

I recall being told by an administrator that the message Sir Ken was putting forward was that digital technologies were the way of the future. I watched videos and read books, but never came to that conclusion. It is part of the tool kit 21st Century learners will need, but not the only one.

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Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it

"We’ve talked before about the role of technology in the learning process–mainly because we’re still trying to–as a field, industry, and culture–come to grips with its pitfalls and potential."


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3 Things We Should Stop Doing in Professional Development

3 Things We Should Stop Doing in Professional Development | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Spending the last week in Oslo, Norway, with the visionary Ann Michaelsen and other school leaders here, I have really thought about the way that we deliver professional development, and to be hone...

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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

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Half an Hour: Theories Related to Connectivism

Half an Hour: Theories Related to Connectivism | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it

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Susan Bainbridge's curator insight, April 15, 4:08 AM

Insights by Stephen Downes.

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Teaching Students to Embrace Mistakes

Teaching Students to Embrace Mistakes | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
For the last ten years, we've worked one-on-one with students from elementary school through graduate school. No matter their age, no matter the material, when you ask what they're struggling with, s

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9 Wonderful TED Talks on Re-imagining Schools

9 Wonderful TED Talks on Re-imagining Schools | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
March 18, 2014
Is our education system broken? Answers to this question differ depending on the perspective from which each one of us looks at it and also in terms of what we mean by broken. This...

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Big Thinkers: Judy Willis on the Science of Learning - YouTube

The noted neurologist turned educator talks about the science of boredom, how to get students' attention, and the most important lessons for 21st-century lea...
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Schools Helping Struggling Students Also Can Boost High-Flyers, Study Says

Schools Helping Struggling Students Also Can Boost High-Flyers, Study Says | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Top students aren't necessarily hurt academically by a school's focus on low-performers, finds a new study at the Association for Education Finance and Policy conference.
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Ralph Pirozzo's Matrix

Ralph Pirozzo's Matrix | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Debbie Northway's insight:

Ralph  has worked with educators for more than a decade to develop a planning matrix  based on sound learning and thinking theory. The matrix combines Bloom's Taxonomy of thinking levels and Gardner's Multiple Intelligence Theory to provide teachers with a  planning tool that caters for both learning styles (MI) and challenges  thinking (Blooms).

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SAMR as a Framework for Moving Towards Education 3.0

SAMR as a Framework for Moving Towards Education 3.0 | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
Evolution, in its broadest sense, serves as a force to help humans move towards a better way of living given the current times or Zeitgeist.  It follows, then, that the education field should evolv...

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Finding the right sensemaking routines is crucial for Personal Knowledge Management! "Social filtering

Finding the right sensemaking routines is crucial for Personal Knowledge Management! "Social filtering | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it

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Steven Verjans's curator insight, October 27, 2013 6:29 AM

"The challenge [in Personal Knowledge management] is to find something that works for you and will last over time. This is probably the biggest hurdle in PKM." 

iPamba's curator insight, February 18, 5:56 PM

Great insights, great process, and great links!

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The Roberto Marzano’s 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic

The Roberto Marzano’s 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic | Pedagogy and Research Theory | Scoop.it
The Robert Marzano's 9 Effective Instructional Strategies Infographic summarizes the 9 instructional strategies to improve students' learning.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 3:50 PM

For those that are lifelong learners  and in the learning mode as opposed to the knowing mode.  Let me count the ways to get a message across no matter what the age of the student is.

Rocio Watkins's curator insight, February 22, 10:34 PM

Marzano's famous "Nine" continue to be the topic of many professional development agendas, and continue to deliver research-based and improved student outcomes.  A "must-know" for the teaching vocation.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, February 23, 6:15 PM

This is a keeper!

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Inquiry-Based Learning - YouTube

Inquiry Based Learning Teaching model. Created for a curriculum and instruction class!

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The Fault In Our Stars | Official Trailer [HD] | 20th Century FOX - YouTube

Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Gus (Ansel Elgort) are two extraordinary teenagers who share an acerbic wit, a disdain for the conventional, and a love that swe...

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