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Pedagogical Ponderings
Encouraging teachers to think about effective teaching, strategies, programmes, assessment and reporting that will instill key C21 competences and maximise the potential of e-Learning.
Curated by Charles Newton
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Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education

Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Armed with a set of criteria drawn from different disciplines, I identified seven separate intelligences. All human beings possess these seven intelligences, but we differ from one another in which are strong; and in any case, strength or weakness in one (say spatial intelligence) does not predict strength or weakness in another (say, interpersonal or musical intelligence).

 

I would now add a few more intelligences to the list, and others, most famously Daniel Goleman, have proposed yet other intelligences like emotional intelligence. I am no longer invested in my particular set of intelligences. For me, the important advance is that a multiplicity of intelligences has been acknowledged—wits, rather than wit.

 

In this era of succinct messaging, I’ve created a twitter-short formula: Multiple Wits and Good Grits Lead to a Success Beyond Selfies.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Howard-GARDNER


 


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Antonio Gerardo Gutiérrez Sánchez's curator insight, October 4, 10:31 PM

agregar su visión ...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 5, 10:07 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Laura Saavedra's curator insight, October 8, 5:26 PM

So what is your mind like?

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For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply

For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

 

“Until adolescence there are lots of new connections being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment,” Brant says.

 

The brain adds many synapses in the cortex. This comes at a time when the brain is especially responsive to learning. This is typically followed by cortical pruning in adolescence, as the brain shifts from hyperlearning mode.

Hewitt agrees: “The developing brain is a much more flexible organ than the mature brain.”

 

Learning doesn’t stop at adolescence, of course, but the “sensitive period” — where the brain is hyperlearning mode — does appear to come to an end. Learning new things gets harder.

 


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 24, 2013 11:44 AM
Thanks Linda. I appreciate the reference to the NPR discussion.
Aramis's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:56 AM

brilliant

Sharla Shults's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:40 PM

For some reason, as kids get older, they no longer 'think that thinking' is important! They don't want to think; instead, they simply just want the answer.

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Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning

Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning from TeachThought

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 13, 2013 7:13 PM

 

I love it...

 

Check ALSO:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=L2L

 

 

Allan Shaw's curator insight, April 14, 2013 6:55 PM

"The shift is from learning content to learning how to learn.

The takeaways for teachers probably start with the role of the student in the learning process: voice, choice, personalization, self-direction, project-based learning, and other low-hanging fruit of current trends in learning.

Bigger picture, the conclusions are probably more directed with educational structures, the form of curriculum, and school design."

The micro needs to be worked on in school. The macro needs to be addressed by school and system leaders. Thanks Gust!

Stephen Gwilliam's curator insight, April 16, 2013 10:23 PM

Could you add any more dimensions to this list? How about applying a Field Force Tool at a staff meeting?

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The Padagogy Wheel

The Padagogy Wheel | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it

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Simon Vuillaume's curator insight, April 29, 2013 5:58 PM

Ipadagogy... 

Deborah Banker's curator insight, May 12, 2013 2:03 PM

WOW!!  How cool is this?!

Louise Lewis's curator insight, September 20, 2013 8:34 PM

Perfect for our research into Web 2.0 tools that we may include in our webmixes

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48 iPad Apps That Teachers Love

48 iPad Apps That Teachers Love | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it

48 IPAD APPS THAT TEACHERS LOVE by staff writers SOURCE: www.onlinecolleges.net June 26, 2012 Apple’s iPad and other tablet computers have certainly been garnering ardent support from the edtech ...

 

Read more:

http://fedebooks.wordpress.com/2012/06/27/48-ipad-apps-that-teachers-love-fed_ebooks-apps-ebook-teacher/

 


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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

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Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success

Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Students' exposure to so-called 21st-century skills in school correlates positively with perceived quality of work later in life, according to a new study by Gallup Inc

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 31, 2013 5:37 PM

 

         ===> PracTICE matters, prepare the learners for the "Real-World"! <===

 

Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, June 1, 2013 8:49 AM

Teaching = learning

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Self-Directed Learning Well Explained and 27 Actions

Self-Directed Learning Well Explained and 27 Actions | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it

TeachThought.com has a series of posts about self-directed learning by Terry Heick and the staff, well worth a read! “

 

“Learning is most effective when it’s personalised; it means something to the learner. That happens when people feel they are participants and investors in their own learning, shaping what and how they learn, and able to articulate its value to them.” — Leadbeater, Charles

 


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Charles Newton's insight:

Nice to see an over used concept unpicked in greater depth.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 25, 2013 2:16 PM

It is interesting how few classroom teachers and administrators are aware of what self-directed learning is. SDL is an imperative for our children.

Avery's curator insight, March 25, 2013 11:56 PM

My Thoughts:

You can't teach someone how to learn. You can give them helpful tips and advice, but a single structure for education is not going to work for everyone. It's so much harder for people to learn their true potential, to reach their goals, when they're only shown a single path to them. You show them the path through the forest, but what if there's a rock face nearby that also leads up to where they want to go, and what if they happen to be a fantastic rock climber? It just makes more sense to show someone a map if you can, instead of directing them towards only one path.

Official AndreasCY's curator insight, March 30, 2013 2:58 PM

“Learning is most effective when it’s personalised; it means something to the learner. That happens when people feel they are participants and investors in their own learning, shaping what and how they learn, and able to articulate its value to them.” — Leadbeater, Charles

 

Famous Self-Taughts (Autodidacts): Leonardo Da Vinci, William Blake, Herb Rits (in addition to Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and many others)

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Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension

Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it

This is quite a clever and helpful device to tie together a large number of ideas about Bloom's Taxonomy in the Cognitive Domain. I highly recommend that interested readers visit the website and play with it. It's done quite well (although it would be even better if the few misspellings were attended to). Access it at http://eductechalogy.org/swfapp/blooms/wheel/engage.swf

 

But this gets me up on my soapbox because it highlights quite a significant oversight, in my opinion.

 

When Benjamin Bloom wrote his original work, he spoke of 3 domains, not just one. All 3 were, and are, of roughly equal importance in educating young people. The other 2 are the Affective Domain and the Psychomotor Domain. These correspond roughly to what, in today's parlance, might be called Social and Emotional Learning (Affective) and Mental and Physical Health (Psychomotor). Too much (or too little) emphasis on any one of the domains almost guarantees a lack of balance in childrens' learning and development. We can see this in the pejorative, hurtful names students call their peers when one of the domains assumes an unblanced priority over the others. Cognitive imbalance can lead to students being called eggheads or nerds, Affective imbalance to students being called geeks or loners, and Psychomotor imbalance to students being called dumb jocks or crazies.

 

It seems to me that the standards movement and the high-stakes testing movement have come to symbolize an educational environment that is seriously out of balance...with far too much emphasis on the Cognitive Domain, and too little on the Affective and Psychomotor. We have too many students who excel in one domain, and too few who are well rounded in two or three, as well as too many who do not reach their potential in any.

 

Furthermore, the emphasis on the separation of the Cognitive from the Affective and Psychomotor, has created structural imbalances in the operation of schools (read allocations of time, financial and material resources, personnel, and intellectual enegy) that work to the detriment of our young people and our communities.The drive toward home schooling and charter schools can be viewed as two manifestations of this structural imbalance...increasing numbers of parents view schools (especially public ones) as unsuitable places to send their children and clamor for alternatives that offer a better balance among the 3 domains.

 

This is a great graphic organizeer, but it represents only an exaggeratedly large part of a much more important whole. -JL

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Paulo Simões, Shary Lyssy Marshall, Lynnette Van Dyke, Freddy Håkansson, Katharina Kulle, Rui Guimarães Lima, Jim Lerman, Lars-Göran Hedström
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Roberto Ivan Ramirez's curator insight, July 16, 3:35 PM

La rueda taxonómica se irá enriqueciendo en la medida que las TIC sigan su propia evolución creativa e innovadora en lel proceso de implementación, evaluación y seguimiento en los entornos de aprendizaje físicos, virtuales y mixtos.

Al Post's curator insight, July 29, 5:32 PM

Pretty cool...interactive Adobe Flash site. Click on an area to see additional information.

Tina Jameson's curator insight, July 31, 7:20 PM

http://eductechalogy.org/swfapp/blooms/wheel/engage.swf

 

Interactive animation that breaks down the 'wheel' - includes suggested 'tools' that could be used for different related activities.