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School of Thought--A Vision for the Future of Learning

School of Thought--A Vision for the Future of Learning | Pearson Public Affairs | Scoop.it

The future of learning means many things to many people. By producing the School of Thought series, with the three stories of education at various levels, we at Pearson share our vision of trends, dependencies, and education possibilities in the near future. Learn more about the video series and research here: researchnetwork.pearson.com/online-learn­ing/videos 

View Rey's story here: http://youtu.be/B-gHVjv4_c4
View Victoria's story here: http://youtu.be/7idyNIvVCis
View Simone's story here: http://youtu.be/yQRdIZR_LYY

Pearson Public Affairs's insight:

Check out these new conversation-starter videos by Pearson's Research & Innovation Network Center for Online Learning

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Week 2: The Quality of Massive Open Online Courses by Stephen Downes | MOOC Quality Project

Week 2: The Quality of Massive Open Online Courses by Stephen Downes | MOOC Quality Project | Pearson Public Affairs | Scoop.it

The Quality of Massive Open Online Courses

The primary criticism of what I will address in this chapter is that success is process-defined rather than outcomes-defined.[1] Without outcomes measurement we cannot measure success, we can’t focus our efforts toward that success, we can’t become more competitive and efficient, we can’t plan for change and improvement, and we can’t define what you want to accomplish as a result. All this is true, and yet there is no measure of outcome or success that can be derived from designer and user motivations, or even from the uses to which MOOCs are put. The only alternative is to identify what a successful MOOC ought to produce as output, without reference to existing (and frankly, very preliminary and very variable) usage.


Via Alastair Creelman, Lars-Göran Hedström
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Paz Barceló's comment, May 14, 2013 2:55 PM
Buscaba la "conexión" entre los postulados de Downes y el conexionismo de Rumelhart y McClelland. Especialmente por los términos que Siemens y Downes utilizan: nodos de información. Información distribuida. Los argumentos alternativos a la IA. El aprendizaje PDP construído a partir de modificaciones y reajustes continuos. En este post se habla de ellos; de Rumelhart y McClelland. Y aunque las diferencias con el conexionismo estén ahí, me aclara diversas cuestiones. Gracias!
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10 Expectations Learners Have!

"We hear often of the "high expectations" schools must have of and for their students, yet we seldom hear of the expectations students have of their schools."


Via Kathleen McClaskey, Lars-Göran Hedström
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:03 AM

Learners' expectations constitute the new "rules of engagement" in the relationship that young people want with their schools. Consider these expectations and then have an open dialogue on how you can create "learner-centered" environments where these expectations could be realized for the learners in your school.

Vicki Butler's curator insight, May 14, 2013 11:58 AM

Just had this discussion with a dear friend in his late 70's. Thanks for posting this!

Lou Salza's curator insight, May 15, 2013 11:13 AM

I liked this. It was an opportunity for me to listen to the learner point of view. The 10 expectations are relevant at any level but these are particularly important at the secondary and college level in my view. These expectations also speak to how on line and blended learning environments will or will not connect to learners. well worth 4 minutes!-Lou

 

Excerpt from the decription on YouTube:" We hear often of the "high expectations" schools must have of and for their students, yet we seldom hear of the expectations students have of their schools. Students' expectations constitute the new "rules of engagement" in the relationship that young people want with their schools."