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Persian silk in Viking burials – Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Persian silk in Viking burials – Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Ancient history | Scoop.it

The silk trade was far more comprehensive than we have hitherto assumed and recent research may change our perceptions of the history of the Norwegian Vikings.

After four years of in-depth investigation of the silk trade of the Viking Age, Marianne Vedeler, Associate Professor at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo has found that the Norwegian Vikings maintained trade connections with Persia and the Byzantine Empire through a network of traders from a variety of places and cultures who brought the silk to the Nordic countries.


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Taphonomic analysis of Neolithic seated burials

Taphonomic analysis of Neolithic seated burials | Ancient history | Scoop.it

Taphonomy is the study of how organisms decay and become altered following their death. Understanding how this process manifests in human burials during the excavation is extremely important, and can lead to improved interpretations of the burials when carried out properly.


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Shannon Bench's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:22 PM

These guys always looked creepy to me, like they were somehow the reincarnated forms of those that had passed. Kind of like what archeologist think too, but what I mean is that they were born like that... now they die like that too. It's all kind of creepy to me.

Allie Lau's curator insight, January 17, 2014 1:36 AM

It is great that people who study taphonomy are able to study and examine the bodies found in ancient burial sites.

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Land of the tomb raiders: Bulgaria is trying to claw back tens of thousands of ancient artefacts plundered from its historic sites in a £25m-a-year export racket

Land of the tomb raiders: Bulgaria is trying to claw back tens of thousands of ancient artefacts plundered from its historic sites in a £25m-a-year export racket | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Real-life vampires, giant rock vaginas, ancient sites to rival those of Greece and Rome – Bulgaria’s archaeologists are putting their country on the map of world history, but first they have to stop the mafia stealing its treasures.

 

The illegal diggers come at night with shovels and sacks, hunting through the places where they know the professionals have been. They’re looking for the tonnes of ancient artefacts that lie hidden in Bulgaria’s soil.

 

In the past two decades, Bulgarian law enforcement agencies say this plunder has turned into a €30m-a-year industry for local gangs, putting it a close third behind drugs and prostitution. The artefacts – gold Roman coins, ancient Greek silver, Thracian military helmets – wind up with falsified documents in auction houses in Europe and North America, or increasingly with wealthy Arab and Asian collectors.

 

Police say there are 300 criminal treasure-hunting gangs in Bulgaria at present, but as many as 50,000 people are thought to be involved in illegal digging in some form. Entire villages have been known to take part in some impoverished corners of Bulgaria.

 


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ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations to begin in ancient Sebastapolis after two decades

ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations to begin in ancient Sebastapolis after two decades | Ancient history | Scoop.it

After a 22-year hiatus, archaeological excavations will begin once again in the ancient city of Sebastapolis in the Central Anatolian province of Tokat’s Sulusaray district.

Sulusaray district administrator Yaşar Kemal Yılmaz said Sebastapolis was known as one of the most significant ancient cities in the Central Black Sea and Northeastern Anatolian region.

Yılmaz said the ancient city had been the capital of a number of states in the past. “One of the leading Roman cities, Sebastapolis, is regarded as a ‘second Ephesus’ by archaeologists and experts. It is a highly significant area. But because of some technical problems and a lack of interest, the excavations that were carried out between 1987 and 1991 were insufficient. The ancient city is in a bad and idle situation. We are doing our best for the protection of ancient pieces there with the help of security forces. Excavations should begin as soon as possible to unearth these works and present them to the world,” he said.

 


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Cassandra Folkerth's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:26 AM

Archeology is so cool. I wonder what they'll find or learn from excavating finally after 22 years. 

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Roman mosaics and the dissemination of feminine stereotypes

Roman mosaics and the dissemination of feminine stereotypes | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Researchers at Carlos III University in Madrid have announced that many Roman mosaics include references to women as the cause of wars and other evils.  The roles of women in the mosaic can be broken into three broad groups: familial (wife, mother,...

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5 of the Most Powerful Women in Ancient Rome

5 of the Most Powerful Women in Ancient Rome | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Everything was epic in Ancient Rome, the battles, the leaders, the gladiators, even the women. Ancient Roman society prized honor, intellect, and strength. The wealthy of this empire were power hungry and were willing to lie, cheat, and even kill...
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Khai Tran's curator insight, January 21, 2014 9:59 PM

In the past and even some instances today women are not known for their power and having the ability to be in charge. However over many decades society has changed where women have more powerful roles and impact as leaders 

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Researchers Find Evidence Of Ancient Cemetery In North Central Vietnam

Caves in central Thanh Hoa province have shown evidence of ancient cemetery and tools dating back more than 10,000 years and climate change from the end of the glacier age.

Vietnam News Agency (VNA) reports the findings were part of a year-long research by scientists from the Vietnam Archaeology Institute and the Novosibirsk Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography.


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Discovery of 17th Dynasty Ancient Egyptian elite : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Discovery of 17th Dynasty Ancient Egyptian elite : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Ancient history | Scoop.it

The Djehuty Project, led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), has discovered on the hill of Dra Abu el-Naga in Luxor (ancient Thebes), the burials of four individuals belonging to the elite of the 17th Dynasty of Ancient Egypt, who lived about 3,550 years ago.

These findings, discovered during the 12th campaign of archaeological excavations, shed light on a little-known historical period in which Thebes becomes the capital of the kingdom and the empire’s foundations become established with the dominance of Egypt over Palestine and Syria to the north, and over Nubia to the south.


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Ancient Civilizations

Compare different aspects of life in ancient civilizations.


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elizama ramirez's curator insight, February 3, 2014 6:29 PM

Many of the things we do now a days are based on what our ancestors did in the past except things are much easier for us due to the advance in technology. 

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History: The Roots of Urban Civilization

History: The Roots of Urban Civilization | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Where does the idea of urban civilization, or the city itself, originate?

 

The name Mesopotamia was used by the ancient Greeks to describe land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. It means literally “between the rivers” and largely corresponds to present-day Iraq. However, today the term has a broader interpretation, stretching to include parts of Syria and Turkey as well. The region, which incorporates the “fertile crescent,” is widely considered to be the cradle of human civilization. 

 

Author and former journalist Paul Kriwaczek has observed that “ancient Mesopotamia acted as a kind of experimental laboratory for civilization.” It was into the rural environment of this region that the idea of civilization was born “in a single place, at a single time. From there and from then,” says Kriwaczek, “the concept spread at remarkable speed to conquer the world.”


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David Connolly's curator insight, January 2, 2013 6:34 AM

A very thoughtful article about this crucial period in human development

Andrew Nayyar's curator insight, January 17, 2014 11:09 PM

I like how this article gives readers a description of Mesopotamia from both an ancient and contemporary view point. I was unaware that Mesopotamia meant between to rivers according to Greeks, or that it was home to Babylon. Interesting read indeed. 

JERRY KITH's curator insight, January 24, 2014 8:59 PM

There was an urban culture back in the ancient mesotopmia days. 

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Neolithic skull fragment discovered on banks of Avon -- Secret ...

A 5000-year-old mystery has been sparked after part of a human skull was found on a riverbank. Archaeologists said the unbroken piece of upper skull was in "fabulous" condition with the intricate marks from the blood vessels ...

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Remarkable ringfenced burials from Roman Colchester

Remarkable ringfenced burials from Roman Colchester | Ancient history | Scoop.it

A recently-completed cemetery excavation close to Colchester’s Roman circus has revealed that some of Camulodunum’s citizens marked their grave plots with ditches and wooden fences. It had previously been speculated that, during the Roman period, those unable to afford stone monuments might have used wooden markers or mounds of earth to distinguish individual burials. Now a four-month investigation by Colchester Archaeological Trust has unearthed clusters of inhumations dated by grave goods and other finds  to the 2nd and 3rd century and surrounded in some cases by lines of small post-holes up to about 20cm in diameter.


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David Connolly's curator insight, March 9, 2013 7:04 PM

Pretty damn fine!

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The Vikings Were Definitely NOT Nice People | HuffPost.com

The Vikings Were Definitely NOT Nice People | HuffPost.com | Ancient history | Scoop.it

Were the Vikings even more brutal than we realized?

 

From the 9th Century to the 11th Century, marauding Viking warriors laid waste to a broad swath of Europe, and in the process often took slaves for physical labor and sex. Now researchers from the University of Oslo in Norway say they've found new evidence suggesting that when their Viking masters died, slaves were beheaded and buried along with them.

 

Elise Naumann, an archaeologist at the university, and her colleagues reached this conclusion after analyzing the skeletal remains of 10 Viking-era bodies originally discovered decades ago in Flakstad, Norway. The researchers paid particular attention to graves that contained the remains of two or more bodies -- but only one head.

 

"We were curious about the Flakstad double burials," Naumann told The Huffington Post in an email. "They are poorly documented, and the definition of double burial was doubted at the time. It was thus strange that only one skull was retrieved from each double burial, but postcranial bones from two or three individuals."

 

To determine the relationship between those buried in the group graves, Naumann's team analyzed the bones of the headless skeletons for nitrogen and carbon isotopes that can reveal dietary history, USA Today reported.

 

The analysis indicated that the people who left headless remains had subsisted on a diet noticeably different than the diets of the people who were buried with their heads intact. Researchers also tested the the skeletons' mitochondrial DNA and found the bodies were probably not related to each other.

 

The bottom line? According to Naumann, the findings suggest that the headless bodies belonged to slaves of low social status who were killed and given to their dead masters as grave gifts. This theory is based in large part on documented cases of Viking sacrifices from the past.

 

Click headline to read more--


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Map of the Roman Empire - Ancient Cities, Rivers, and Mountains during the first century A.D.

Map of the Roman Empire - Ancient Cities, Rivers, and Mountains during the first century A.D. | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Clickable Map of the Roman Empire with ancient cities, provinces, and placenames. This large topographical map shows the New Testament world about 14 A.D.

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andrea urbina's curator insight, January 31, 2014 11:49 PM

To see what the cities and were rivers were at during this time period is amazing because now a days all this is way different and most places are either gone or restored. Some cities may excist but are way to old and in bad shapes that you can not imagen what it was like.

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My Scoop on Aqueducts in the U.S.

My Scoop on Aqueducts in the U.S. | Ancient history | Scoop.it

Aqueducts are canals or ditches used to carry water from one location to the next. The water that is moved usually comes from lakes or rivers to places that are in need of water. Aqueducts were first used in the Roman Empire, and they were made of limestone. Today, aqueducts are made out of concrete to help keep the water from seeping out. Pressurized steel pipes that carry the water can be under or above ground.

 

Big and populous cities may be very reliant on aqueducts to get their fresh water. Two major ones in the United States are New York and Los Angeles. The Catskill aqueduct brings fresh water to New York, and the Colorado River Aqueduct brings fresh water to Los Angeles. The Catskill aqueduct travels about 120 miles, while the Colorado River Aqueduct travels 250 miles. Both of these cities would not be capable of having fresh water if aqueducts didn't exist.

 

There are some negatives to aqueducts though. The construction of them can be very costly, in terms of both the economy and the environment. It costs a lot of money for an aqueduct to be built. But, in my opinion, the environmental effects are more important. The rivers where the water comes from can lose a lot of their water before it reaches the ocean, or they can even dry up. Also, building an aqueduct causes much disturbance to the habitat above and underground.

 

Overall, aqueducts have been very beneficial to lives of millions of people in the United States. Without them, many people living in the United States wouldn't have access to fresh water. People receive fresh water that was once carried by aqueducts, daily.


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History of Ancient Rome

History of Ancient Rome | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Roman History from the kings through the Roman Republic and Empire, with charts of battles, wars, and emperors, timelines, maps and social and cultural history, including foods and clothing.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 30, 2013 8:38 AM

This Scoopit page is about many different facts of Rome. They variety of fact of the Ancient city and separate it into parts.

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Ancient Egypt - Gods, Pyramids, Religions, Sphinx and more ...

Ancient Egypt - Gods, Pyramids, Religions, Sphinx and more ... | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Tomb of Siptah Siptah is one of the lesser-known pharaohs of Egypt who ruled briefly at the end of the 19th Dynasty. When first opened in 1908, his tomb, which lies to the south of the main valley, was found to contain a pink ...

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30 Pre-Columbian Burial Sites Found in Veracruz, Mexico

30 Pre-Columbian Burial Sites Found in Veracruz, Mexico | Ancient history | Scoop.it
See on Scoop.it - Medical Tourism News
“ INAH, announced the discovery of 30 pre-Columbian burials and a pyramid in an ancient settlement in eastern Mexico that could be up to 2,000 years old”
Monica...

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The Wonders of Ancient Civilizations | Lesson Planet

The Wonders of Ancient Civilizations | Lesson Planet | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Bring excitement and interest to your social studies with a unit on ancient civilizations. ... Captivating and fascinating, the study of ancient civilizations enriches any curriculum. Instilling in this generation an ...

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David Connolly's comment, January 4, 2013 6:30 AM
Brilliant find that. great idea for teachers
elizama ramirez's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:38 AM

Ancient Civilization has shaped us to who we are today. Some concepts are to know strategies of agriculture, art, religion, economic system, literacy, and a organized government.

Martin bui's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:57 AM

Culture is a big thing in ancient civilization because different area had different tradition.

 

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The Wonders of Ancient Civilizations | Lesson Planet

The Wonders of Ancient Civilizations | Lesson Planet | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Bring excitement and interest to your social studies with a unit on ancient civilizations. ... Captivating and fascinating, the study of ancient civilizations enriches any curriculum. Instilling in this generation an ...

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David Connolly's comment, January 4, 2013 6:30 AM
Brilliant find that. great idea for teachers
elizama ramirez's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:38 AM

Ancient Civilization has shaped us to who we are today. Some concepts are to know strategies of agriculture, art, religion, economic system, literacy, and a organized government.

Martin bui's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:57 AM

Culture is a big thing in ancient civilization because different area had different tradition.

 

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First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ... - Syracuse.com

First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ... - Syracuse.com | Ancient history | Scoop.it
First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ...
Syracuse.com
Or explain the significance of gods and goddesses, ziggurats, temples and priests in Mesopotamia?

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Top 10 Ancient Religious Sites

Top 10 Ancient Religious Sites | Ancient history | Scoop.it
Whether you are religious or not; it must be accepted that religion has been with us for a very long time. Some of the most monumental structures ever made have had religious functions.

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