PE and Literacy
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John Ratey (jratey) on Twitter

John Ratey (jratey) on Twitter | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
The latest from John Ratey (@jratey). Shrink on the move getting people moving. Loves sushi, Family Guy, and sprinting. Boston, MA
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Neuroplasticity - Monique Giroux, MD

Neuroplasticity - Monique Giroux, MD | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Neuroplasticity is defined as the ability of brain cells and neural networks (brain circuits) to change or increase their connections in response to new activities.

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Why Kids Need to Tinker to Learn

Why Kids Need to Tinker to Learn | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it

"The Maker Movement http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/tag/maker-movement/  has inspired progressive educators to bring more hands-on learning and tinkering into classrooms, and educator Gary Stager would like to see formal schooling be influenced by the Maker Movement, which has inspired young learners to tinker, to learn by doing, and take agency for their learning."


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Lisa Carey's curator insight, August 27, 2014 4:28 PM

Action & Expression!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 28, 2014 11:07 AM

The Maker movement taps into the very heart of learning adding purpose and practice to pedagogy,  a heutagogical approach.  How's that for an educational classification?

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Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School

Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
The Institute of Medicine have produced a new report that examines the status of physical activity and physical education efforts in schools and what can be done to help schools get students to become more active in the school environment.

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Live Webinar | Neuroplasticity and Skill Acquisition: Application for Clinical Practice | Beth Fisher | Neurology

Live Webinar | Neuroplasticity and Skill Acquisition: Application for Clinical Practice | Beth Fisher | Neurology | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Health care providers are facing greater time restrictions to render services to the individual with neurological dysfunction.
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"Based on studies of your brain's... - Neprican Motivation | Facebook

"Based on studies of your brain's... - Neprican Motivation | Facebook | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
"Based on studies of your brain's neuroplasticity, If you want to get better, think smarter, and live longer, there are three things you can do. 1....
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Dr. John Ratey | Neuroplasticity & Education

Dr. John Ratey | Neuroplasticity & Education | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Looking forward to hearing Dr.Ratey @jratey speak at #Neuroplasticity and #Education: Strengthening the Connection http://t.co/hPd9cJQ9e2
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Neuroplasticity is Changing the Way We Practice - NICABM

Neuroplasticity is Changing the Way We Practice - NICABM | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
In our recent series on The New Brain Science, we heard from specialists at the forefront of the latest developments in neuroplasticity. What was most exciting was that practitioners attending the webinar started applying the ...
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Exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity targeting motor and cognitive ...

Exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity targeting motor and cognitive circuitry in Parkinson's disease. By - Dr Giselle M Petzinger MD, Beth E Fisher PhD, Sarah McEwen PhD, Jeff A Beeler PhD, John P Wals...
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Report: A body in motion gets better grades | District Administration Magazine

News, Articles and Community for district-level decision makers in K-12 education. Magazine published monthly, with daily news and blogs and online content. Archives available.
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ASB Presentations NESA 09 - Loving Literacy through Music and Movement

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Wired and Wireless Components of the Brain

Wired and Wireless Components of the Brain | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Traditionally, we have understood the immune system and the nervous system as two distinct and unrelated entities. The former fights disease by responding to pathogens and stimulating inflammation and other responses. The latter directs sensation, movement, cognition and the functions of the internal organs. For some, therefore, the recent discovery that left-sided brain lesions correlate with an increased rate of hospital infections is difficult to understand. However, other recent research into the extremely close relationship between these two systems makes this finding comprehensible.

A study, published in the March 2013 issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, looked at more than 2,000 hospital patients with brain lesions from either stroke or traumatic brain injury. They looked at how many of these brain-injured patients contracted infections within 2 to 3 days of admission. Of those patients who developed infections, 60% had left-sided lesions. The authors concluded that an unknown left-sided brain/immune network might influence infections. But why would the left side of the brain affect immunity?

The nervous and immune systems are quite different in their speed and mode of action. The two major immune systems, innate and adaptive, are both wireless—they communicate through cell-to-cell contact, secreted signals, and antigen-antibody reactions. The innate system is the first responder, followed by the slower adaptive response. The nervous system, on the other hand, is wired for much more rapid communication throughout the body. It turns out that the two work surprisingly closely together.

The Brain Helps Immune Function

One example of cooperation between the immune and nervous systems is inflammation. Of the four signs of inflammation—pain, heat, redness, and swelling—it has been thought that only pain is mediated through the nervous system. Recently, however, it has been shown that all aspects of the immune process are in some ways modulated or directly meditated by the nervous system.

Only quite recently was it learned that neurons could directly stimulate the immune mast and dendritic cells into action against pathogens. Also, neuropeptides secreted by neurons often function directly as an antibiotic. A surprising new finding is that pain fibers send signals in the direction opposite to their usual sensory function, and directly alter the immune response by stimulating white blood cells and changing the flow of blood.Direct links between the two systems have now been found in which neurons also affect the three hallmarks of inflammation other than pain—heat, swelling and redness. The first response to danger comes from nerves in the skin, lining of the lungs, and digestive and urinary tracts. Neuronal signals related to noxious stimuli, trauma, toxins, and microbes use more than a dozen recently discovered neurotransmitters to directly change blood flow, which increases heat, swelling and redness and attracts local immune cells. Another finding consistent with this is that severing a nerve lowers inflammation in patients with arthritis.

Many of the complex feedback loops between immune cells and neurons are just being discovered. For example, lymphocytes, whose behavior is now known to be affected by dopamine, also secrete dopamine. In this elaborate communication circuit, lymphocytes are affected by neuronal secretion of dopamine and then use dopamine to pass signals to other immune cells.

The Immune System Helps the Nervous System

Just as neurons are using their hard-wired, speedy connections to perform functions previously thought to be specific to the immune system, so too are immune cells performing tasks thought to be in the purview of the nervous system.

It is critical to avoid damage in the brain from immune reactions. The brain is the only region of the body where intrusion of ordinary immune cells is rare and can be devastating, causing much of the damage associated with illnesses such as meningitis and encephalitis. Microglia are specialized brain-based immune cells, part of the glia family, that protect against intruders near the blood brain barrier. They also watch for microbes near another less well-known protective barrier in the brain, made up of a dense web of astrocytes, another type of glial cell. When there is an intruder, microglia send warning signals to the neurons and other glia cells, triggering a rapid response. In this response, microglia can identify microbes and toxins, and can provide antigens related to these microbes to immune cells. Immune cells, such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells, are waiting in the blood vessels nearby to help.

But immune cells do much more than just protecting the brain from intruders. In the peripheral nervous system, immune cells help rebuild axons that have been damaged. Immune cells are also critical to the very important synapse-pruning process that occurs on a daily basis to update connections and eliminate unnecessary and unused synapses between neurons. One major way that synapses are pruned is with the help of the complement cascade, a very elaborate component of the immune system that “complements” the use of antibodies to kill pathogens. In fact, when a fetus is being pruned of the 900 billion extra neurons not being maintained through experience, there is a very high amount of complement protein present in the fetus. Finally, molecules involved in the immune antigen reactions, such as immunoglobulin, sit on the surface of neurons as adhesion molecules. These adhesion molecules guide neuron migration, as well as the long voyage of the axon to make a synapse, where one neuron meets another neuron that has on its surface a protein molecule from the complement cascade.

A very surprising recent finding goes even further. It has been discovered that microglia control production of neurons from stem cells as the brain develops. These brain-based immune cells remove healthy neural progenitor cells through phagocytosis to control the over-production of neurons.

 

Read more : http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/2013/03/14/wired-and-wireless-components-of-the-brain/


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Neuroplasticity: Changing our Belief about Change, by Joanna Holsten

Neuroplasticity: Changing our Belief about Change, by Joanna Holsten | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
A dangerous belief in our culture is that we can't change. We've all heard the disempowered statements: 'He's just grumpy. He can't change that.' or 'I will always be anxious.

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Change The Structure of Your Brain! Neuroplasticity | SUPER BRAIN

To learn more about SUPER BRAIN and read the book, click here: http://bit.ly/SbAmz Description: How can we change the structure of our brain and what is neur...
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Department of Defense Adopts New Physical Education Program for ...

Department of Defense Adopts New Physical Education Program for ... | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Don't let the name fool you: the Department of Defense is taking the Offense in the fight against childhood obesity. During the past two years, Department.
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Technology in Physical Education: Fun/Educational Ways to Start Implementing Technology in PE

Technology in Physical Education: Fun/Educational Ways to Start Implementing Technology in PE | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
RT @dartfish: Fun/Educational Ways to Start Implementing Technology in #PE
#Physed #education http://t.co/5oMz3YYxel

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Chris Carter's curator insight, July 12, 2013 6:25 PM
Useful, & seldom discussed.
Chris Carter's comment, July 16, 2013 6:16 AM
Thank you, Carlos!
Carlos J. López's comment, July 17, 2013 7:33 AM
Best regards
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Music Training and Neuroplasticity

Music Training and Neuroplasticity | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
The multi sensory nature of music training and neuroplasticity included brain changes related to perception, sensation, performance and abstract reasoning.
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Neuroplasticity | BalanceWear: Stabilize Your Body

Neuroplasticity | BalanceWear: Stabilize Your Body | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
According to leading neurology expert, Dr. Darcy Umphred, Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to reorganize itself and form new neural connections.1 When one has an injury to the brain from trauma or disease, the ...
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The Brain That Changes Itself - Change You Choose

The Brain That Changes Itself - Change You Choose | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
In his New York Times Bestseller, THE BRAIN THAT CHANGES ITSELF, Dr. Norman Doidge profiles the story of Cheryl Schiltz. Today, she talks to Michele Rosenthal.
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SPARK™ Principal Researcher Honored for Contributions to the Study of Physical Education,... -- SAN DIEGO, August 13, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --

SPARK™ Principal Researcher Honored for Contributions to the Study of Physical Education, Physical Activity and Health. (Dr.
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The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself

The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself | PE and Literacy | Scoop.it
Not only can the brain learn new tricks, but it can also change its structure and function--even in old age
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