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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | PDS American History | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


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HIST212: Introduction to United States History: Reconstruction to the Present « The Saylor Foundation

Introduction to United States History: Reconstruction to the Present

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Posts Organized by APHG Units

Posts Organized by APHG Units | PDS American History | Scoop.it
I’ve added a two new drop-down menu tabs to this website for my geography education resources; one that is organized thematically (this one) and well as another that is regionally focused.  T...

 

I’ve recently overhauled my other website http://geographyeducation.org in ways that will hopefully help teachers find specific resources for any given unit during the school year. I love this Scoop.it site for showing the latest materials that I’ve found. The “filter” function will also a teacher to search a specific topic as I’ve generated numerous “tags” to organize my posts. Still, if a teacher is searching for specific materials in a lesson on particular unit, there are many applicable “tags,” but they are arranged alphabetically.  So I’ve added a drop-down tab entitled “thematic.” Under this drop-down menu are pages dedicated to all the units of AP Human Geography (and environmental and physical geography as well) with links for the pertinent sub themes organized by the AP Human Geography course outline. Additionally, I’ve included approximately 10 of my favorite resources for each unit to the corresponding page. I’ve also added a post slider where I’ll organize the most important posts of the last few weeks. Best of luck in the new school year!


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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | PDS American History | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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Citing Sources: A Quick and Graphic Guide

Citing Sources: A Quick and Graphic Guide | PDS American History | Scoop.it

Via reuvenwerber, Dennis T OConnor, Judy O'Connell, Carla Saunders, Seth Dixon
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Tricia Adams's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:28 AM

Lovely child friendly way to explain!

katana Robertson's curator insight, April 2, 1:09 AM

This website adds insight into the proper way of referencing and avoiding plagiarism. This website is necessary for any written assessment.

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | PDS American History | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

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Mapping History

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DocsTeach

Tools for teaching with documents in the classroom - thousands of primary sources from the National Archives.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | PDS American History | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Activist Impulses: Campus Radicalism in the 1930s

Activist Impulses: Campus Radicalism in the 1930s | PDS American History | Scoop.it

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The Olympics on Film

The Olympics on Film | PDS American History | Scoop.it
Curiously, the cinema and the modern Olympic movement were born at the same moment of time in the same city.
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6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America | PDS American History | Scoop.it
It turns out our teachers, Hollywood and whoever we got our Thanksgiving mythology from (Big Turkey?) all made America's origin story far more boring than it actually was for some very disturbing reasons.

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | PDS American History | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


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Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | PDS American History | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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Map Envelope

Map Envelope | PDS American History | Scoop.it

Print your own customized, place-based envelopes using Google Maps imagery.

 

Tags: art, google. 


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Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech analyzed

Nancy Duarte analyzes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech using principles from her book, Resonate.

 

Today is the 49th anniversary of this famous speech, arguably the most important speech in American history.  May we remember his message forever.  To hear the full speech, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWcPz3TvtCg&feature=player_detailpage


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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | PDS American History | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Create Free Interactive Timelines – Stories Displayed on Maps | myHistro

Create Free Interactive Timelines – Stories Displayed on Maps | myHistro | PDS American History | Scoop.it
On myHistro you can create advanced geolocated timelines that you can play as presentations. Pin your events, videos and photos to the map and share them with friends and family.
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eHistory at OSU | Japanese Internment: This is the Enemy

eHistory at OSU | Japanese Internment: This is the Enemy | PDS American History | Scoop.it
(MultiMedia History) This is the Enemy investigates the internment of Japanese-Americans in the United States following the attack on Pearl Harbor and America's entry into the second World War; streaming video (Flash) or Windows Media Video download...
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History Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group

History Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group | PDS American History | Scoop.it
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GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION | PDS American History | Scoop.it
Resources for geography students and teachers...
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New York -- Before the City

TED Talks 400 years after Hudson found New York harbor, Eric Sanderson shares how he made a 3D map of Mannahatta's fascinating pre-city ecology of hills, rivers, wildlife -- accurate down to the block -- when Times Square was a wetland and you...

 

The Manhattan Project created a picture of the area before the development of a city, the way Henry Hudson did during his 1609 exploration. After 10 years (1999-2009), the research project has expanded to study the entire city of New York. The Welikia Project analyzes geography and landscape ecology to discover the original environment and compare it to present day. Scientists have learned that world's largest cities once had a natural landscape of freshwater wetlands and salt marshes, ponds and streams, forests and fields with an equally diverse wildlife community. By focusing on the city's biodiversity of 400 years ago and the modern era, information can be gathered about what has changed, what has remained constant, where the city was done well and where it needs to improve. This source is useful because it allows for the visualization of NYC in a way never seen before. Urban environments, such as NYC, have a landscape largely created by humans, so the skyscrapers, pavement, and mass population is far removed from the landscape it once was.

 

Find more information about the Welikia Project at http://welikia.org and more on New York City's urban ecology at: http://www.scoop.it/t/urban-geography


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Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 2:03 PM
I was surprised on how green NYC is because of all the cars and urban development. I think this project topic is very informative and interesting (makes me want to got to NYC) . I thought it was very interesting how NYC was in the early 1900s and how it became now. I also think it's a great idea how adding more greenery to the urban city will add sort of a rural feel to a big city.
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How Oil Became King

How Oil Became King | PDS American History | Scoop.it
The history of energy transitions – from wood to coal and from coal to oil as well as natural gas and nuclear power – is a long one.
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Power_Judgment_and_Political_Evil_Intro.pdf

Power, Judgement and Political Evil
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The Morality of Migration

The Morality of Migration | PDS American History | Scoop.it
Immigration pits two moral and legal principles, foundational to the modern state system, against each other. How can they be reconciled?
Via Christine Porschet
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