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Golden Tate's Hit and Ever-Evolving Ethics of Football

Golden Tate's Hit and Ever-Evolving Ethics of Football | PDHPE | Scoop.it

This is an ethical issue we reach in football when it comes to coaching the sport that is know to be brutal and violent.  Coaches at all levels want to win.  Granted, the higher the level of the sport, the more pressure to do so, but at what cost.  Ethically, coaches need to be concerned with the safety of their players and the opposing team.  Back in September, Golden Tate from Seattle Seahawks hits Dallas Cowboy Linebacker Sean Lee hard.  Sends him flying hard.  But what is the outcome of the bodies that recieved and gave the hit?  Team mates and coaches get fired up at hits like this not thinking about the long term affects of what just happened to two athletes.  This kind of tugs at your ethics as a coach.  Coaches teach controlled violence in a sport like football, but how much becomes too much? 


Via Ben Abair, Kristen Towns, Rafael Rhodes
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Bryan G.'s curator insight, September 6, 2014 11:21 AM

Players are now becoming more aware of the dangers of "big hits" and now the focus shifts towards the coaches. Should coaches allow their players to act "lawless"?

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Short Fuses: Do Some Sports Make Kids More Violent? (Infographic)

Short Fuses: Do Some Sports Make Kids More Violent? (Infographic) | PDHPE | Scoop.it

Are students who play sports more violent? Research done by Xin Jian (a PhD candidate at Ohio State) raises this question. Quoting from the post:

"Her study, published this year in the Journal of Youth Adolescence, did not find "across-the-board advantages"—in other words, lower odds of being involved in violence—for young people who participated in sports-centered extracurriculars."

Youth Radio has reported on this issue (http://www.youthradio.org/news/do-sports-really-prevent-youth-violence) and GOOD partnered with them to create this infographic. The research findings show "contributing factors behind youth violence." A key finding is "contact sports increase the chance of fighting dramatically."
Additional information is available in the post, as well as a link to the the study done by Xin Jian, which was published in the 'Journal of Youth Adolescence.' 


Via Beth Dichter
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Edgar Eisiminger's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:37 AM

Going back to our convorsation about if sports are or are not violent. Worth a read.

Jason Gonsalves's curator insight, November 9, 2014 2:39 PM

I learned that many sports can make high school kids violent. Sports such as American Football, wrestling, and other contact sports are the culprits of violence in young athletes lives. I learned that if you play football, you are 42% more likely to be in a fight than if you played basketball.

 

It is interesting to see how certain contact sports that require intentional violence actually cause unnecessary violence in the lives of young athletes. This could possibly be linked to professional football players situations of domestic violence, for example most recently Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson.

 

I choose to read this article because it is interesting to learn about how sports can make children violent, since they are usually used to try to get kids out of violent situations.

 

This helps me because it will make me cautious of what types of sports to pursue a career in and how to help make them a positive impact on the lives of young athletes, instead of a negative violent one.

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Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports? - World Magazine

Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports? - World Magazine | PDHPE | Scoop.it
World Magazine
Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports?
World Magazine
Violence in sports cannot be ignored. Our collective knowledge of the damage done to athletes in certain sports over time has grown to a tipping point.
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John Baker's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:20 PM

Being safe in sports is important but entertaining is more important to fans.

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As occurrences of violence at youth sporting events grow, parents must lead ... - Seminole Chronicle

As occurrences of violence at youth sporting events grow, parents must lead ... - Seminole Chronicle | PDHPE | Scoop.it
As occurrences of violence at youth sporting events grow, parents must lead ...
Seminole Chronicle
Nope, the huge problem that youth and prep sports face today -the one no one seems to want to talk about or address - is pretty much all encompassing.
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Rescooped by Susan from Patriarchy & Masculinity
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Violence (Physicality) in Sports : Hyper-Masculinity

People in society today are often more interested in sports that involve hyper-masculinity, such as football, rather than sports that do not require as much hyper-masculinity, such as golf. Also, in regards to sports like football, ...

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Do sports stars need to fight against violence? - The Age

Do sports stars need to fight against violence? - The Age | PDHPE | Scoop.it
Do sports stars need to fight against violence?
The Age
Do sports stars need to fight against violence? (03:04). With State of Origin III just around the corner, we ask how to curb the violence so often witnessed in sport.
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Robert wilson's comment, February 9, 2015 7:08 PM
The way sports has changed through violence such as from the codes of state of origin in the 90s where the referees were much more lenient to fights and violence in state of origin to today's rules and referees which are much more harsher on player engaging in physical and violent acts outside the game itself on the field it will be a lot of help for talking about how violence is changing in sports from the perspective of player of the 90s to today's players in how violence in sports changes the game itself