Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention"
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rhetorical question

rhetorical question | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
rhetorical question n. A question to which no answer is expected, often used for rhetorical effect.
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Kiss of Judas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According to the Synoptic Gospels, Judas identified Jesus to the soldiers by means of a kiss. This is the kiss of Judas, also known (especially in art) as the Betrayal of Christ, which occurs in the Garden of Gethsemane after the Last Supper, and leads directly to the arrest of Jesus by the police force of the Sanhedrin (Kilgallen 271). In Christian theology, the events from the Last Supper until the death and resurrection of Jesus are referred to as The Passion.

More broadly, a Judas kiss may refer to "an act appearing to be an act of friendship, which is in fact harmful to the recipient."[1]

Both Matthew (26:47–50) and Mark (14:43–45) use the Greek verb kataphilein, which means to kiss firmly, intensely, passionately, tenderly or warmly. It is the same verb that Plutarch uses to describe a famous kiss that Alexander the Great gave Bagoas.[2] According to Matthew, Jesus responded by saying "Friend, do what you are here to do." This has caused speculation that Jesus and Judas were actually in agreement with each other and there was no real betrayal.[3]Luke (22:47–48) presents a very different picture: Jesus sees Judas coming and stops him by asking: "Judas, are you betraying the son of man with a kiss?" The kiss is apparently not delivered at all. Geza Vermes, however, in his book Jesus the Jew, presents a very different view: The Aramaic word barnasha—literally "son of man" but meaning "this person"—is used in Rabbinic literature as a humble, self-effacing way to refer to oneself, to the speaker. It corresponds exactly to the Japanese word sessha, "this one," an old-fashioned way to say "I" or "me" when talking to a superior. Interpreted as such, Jesus would have said "You would use a kiss to betray me?"

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Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
Most Americans know Patrick Henry as a fiery speaker whose pronouncement "Give me liberty or give me death!" rallied American defiance to the British Crown.
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Susan Klein's comment, September 7, 2013 5:19 PM
Read the chapter on "Liberty or Death."
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Patrick Henry - Liberty or Death - Biography.com

Patrick Henry - Liberty or Death - Biography.com | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
Watch video and learn about his famous "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" speech.
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Letters to the editor - Washington Times

Letters to the editor - Washington Times | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
From the readers at The Washington Times: opinion on the issues that affect the future of our nation.
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Patrick Henry's "Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death" Speech : The Colonial Williamsburg Official History Site

Patrick Henry's "Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death" Speech : The Colonial Williamsburg Official History Site | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
Colonial Williamsburg - Experience life in the 18th century at America's largest outdoor history museum...

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allusion

An allusion definition for creative writers, students, and teachers from About.com's guide to fiction writing.
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Sirens :: World Mythology

Sirens :: World Mythology | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
In Greek mythology, Sirens are part human, part bird. The three Sirens were Pisinoe, Aglaope and Thelxiepi, all daughters of the river god, Achelous. One of them played the lyre, one played the flute and another one sang.
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Patrick Henry - Full Episode - Biography.com

Patrick Henry - Full Episode - Biography.com | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
Watch video about the Revolutionary that stated "Give me liberty or give me death."
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Find Documents: Results

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Pick a name for your letter writer from the list of delegates.

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Read letters to the editor from Raleigh, NC | The News & Observer

Read letters to the editor from Raleigh, NC | The News & Observer | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
Read the latest letters to the editor from The News & Observer and NewsObserver.com in Raleigh, NC, in the Research Triangle.
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Patrick Henry Center For Individual Liberty - Biography

Patrick Henry Center For Individual Liberty - Biography | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it
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Animated History: Patrick Henry “Give me Liberty, or give me Death!”

Animated History: Patrick Henry “Give me Liberty, or give me Death!” | Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virgina Convention" | Scoop.it

This fascinating animation brings to life an intriguing American Patriot, often overlooked but pivotal historical figure in his most famous moment:

“Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? … Give me liberty, or give me death!”


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unspy's curator insight, May 27, 2013 2:59 PM

One of the most recognizable figures of the day in revolutionary America and a House of Burgesses representative from Virginia, arguably the most influential colony, Henry helped to rally the key leadership towards the struggle for independence.