Patient
Follow
Find
22.3K views | +67 today
Scooped by Andrew Spong
onto Patient
Scoop.it!

The ethical imperative of diabetes interoperability

The ethical imperative of diabetes interoperability | Patient | Scoop.it

Amy Tenderich writes:

 

The fact is, a handful of manufacturers currently have a stronghold on our diabetes data. Their systems collect this vital health data for us, but are designed to withhold it so that we rely on their products exclusively to access it, share it, or analyze it.

 

More and more patients are finding this intolerable, and are fed up with waiting for the Pharma industry to embrace long-overdue open standards.

 

I’m a bit obsessed with this issue myself, and made it the crux of this year’s DiabetesMine Innovation Summit event. And I keep hearing about patients who are taking matters into their own hands.  One of those is Benjamin West, a thirty-something type 1 software developer who lives in San Francisco and works at the networking company Meraki (they do the wifi for Motel 6 and Peet’s coffee). In his free time, he’s creating a web-based “sandbox” and recruiting other tech-savvy PWDs to help him crack the code on diabetes data sharing. No kidding!

 

“The pump is attached to you and is performing therapy on you. You have the right to know and have access to those medical records. But for some reason, pumps and glucose meters don’t operate that way. The only way to get those records is to go through the vendor. I think there’s a real ethical imperative here, an ethical wrong,” Benjamin says.

Sounds a lot like the ePatient Movement’s rally cry, “Gimme my damn data!”

Andrew Spong's insight:

Click on the title post above to read Amy's full post on the Diabetes Mine blog

more...
Todd Vandenbark's comment, February 1, 2013 9:53 AM
Thanks, this gave me inspiration for my next blog post ( http://bit.ly/XsBvZd ) !
Patient
The empowered patient is a symptom of change in healthcare
Curated by Andrew Spong
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Patient | Scoop.it

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

more...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Vanessa Carter on facial difference and healthcare social media in South Africa #hcsmsa

Vanessa Carter on facial difference and healthcare social media in South Africa #hcsmsa | Patient | Scoop.it
Andrew Spong's insight:

Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA) describes the genesis of #hcsmsa in this interview with Doctors 2.0 (@doctors20):

 

"In November 2013, after seeing how #hcsm was working on Twitter so successfully worldwide, I founded #HCSMSA. #HCSMSA is still very young, and the chats are still upcoming, for now it is only dispersing information about medical advancements which are happening globally and relevant local news."

 

Vanessa will be attending Doctors 2.0 in Paris in June as a guest of the conference.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Beijing crowdfunding campaign aims to develop posture-sensing wearable

Beijing crowdfunding campaign aims to develop posture-sensing wearable | Patient | Scoop.it

Giraffe Friend was developed by Xiang Renkai, a student at Peking University, who was inspired by a Chrome plug-in, which allows users to browse the internet using motion recognition technology.

 

Giraffe Friend is 26mm in diameter and 9mm thick and is inteded to be worn on the user’s upper body, by being clipped on to a shirt collar. If the user hunches over while wearing the device, Giraffe Friend will vibrate as a reminder to maintain good posture. The companion app receives Giraffe Friend data that shows how the user’s posture improves over time. The device comes in seven different colors and will cost about $30.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

From med school to patient-centred care, social media touches nearly everything in health

From med school to patient-centred care, social media touches nearly everything in health | Patient | Scoop.it

With nearly 75 percent of American adults using at least one social network—half of whom belong to more than one—there is no doubt that social media has had a huge impact on society. In the medical profession, social media has traditionally been used on the client side, for comparing notes on a physician or medical office. Now social media is being used in ways that help medical professionals interact with patients, promote healthy living, and increase the overall quality of care...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

By the numbers: digital health in the U.S.

By the numbers: digital health in the U.S. | Patient | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

What do patients expect from mobile health? The statistics

What do patients expect from mobile health? The statistics | Patient | Scoop.it

Nicola Ziady (@nicolaziady) helpful summarises some statistics from a recent PWC mHealth survey :

 

59% of patients expect mHealth to change how they seek information on health issues51% of patients expect mHealth to change how providers send general healthcare information49% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their overall health48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their chronic conditions48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will communicate with their healthcare providers48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their medication46% of patients expect mHealth to change how healthcare providers monitor condition and compliance
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andrew Spong from Buzz e-sante
Scoop.it!

Apple vs. Google: the battle for digital health

Apple vs. Google: the battle for digital health | Patient | Scoop.it
It’s an exciting time in digital health right now. The industry is going mainstream, becoming more consumer focused and large well-known multinational corporations are beginning ...

Via IHEALTHLABS EUROPE, Rémy TESTON
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Staying alive and healthy: digital health meets analog health

Michael Birt on "Abundant Aging and Longevity" at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Arizona State University, 15th February 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

5 business lessons from patient communities

5 business lessons from patient communities | Patient | Scoop.it

Whether you’re in healthcare, retail, or some other industry, here are five business lessons you can learn from patient communities.


1. Understand how to meet high customer expectations


2. Market with sensitivity


3. Keep up with technology


4. Test your communication venues


5. Enhance your relationship with your customers

Andrew Spong's insight:

An interesting attempt to turn the tables: what business can learn from patient communities, rather than vice versa

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Battery that dissolves in the body could power embedded health sensors

Battery that dissolves in the body could power embedded health sensors | Patient | Scoop.it

Embeddable sensors that can track a person's vitals could eventually be a boon for healthcare, but something equally small, portable, and safe is going to have to power those sensors.

 

Researchers from the University of Illinois may have an answer: batteries that slowly decompose in the body. Using magnesium and either iron, tungsten, or molybdenum, the researchers were able to build a small battery that delivered a constant output for at least 24 hours. Operating voltage varies by element, ranging from approximately 0.45V to 0.75V, and by stacking cells in series, the researchers say that they were able to create a battery strong enough to power a conventional LED.


Sitting in a salt-water solution at 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, it took a four-cell battery 11 days to break apart; the temperature was then increased to 185 degrees, almost fully dissolving the battery after another eight days. That battery weighed about 3.5 grams, with cells measuring 3 cm by 1.3 cm and placed 4mm apart. The researchers say the materials are both biocompatible and benign to the environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Patient health searches online: some statistics

Patient health searches online: some statistics | Patient | Scoop.it

Patients are more involved in their own healthcare than ever before, and the consumption process is now as transparent as shopping for household goods.

 

Seventy-five percent of Americans have conducted a search related to personal health in the last year and more than a third use social media to research health conditions.

 

Half of all patients who use the Internet to self-diagnose ultimately schedule a doctor’s appointment.

 

What about the doctors?

 

Seventy-eight percent of US doctors are using digital tools to gather research; 70 percent prefer online training to classroom training; and nearly 40 percent communicate with patients online. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Apple's Healthbook: alleged first photos emerge

Apple's Healthbook: alleged first photos emerge | Patient | Scoop.it
Details and images of Apple's first foray into the booming health and fitness tracking market have been leaked to through the website 9to5Mac. Codenamed Healthbook, the future app is likely to be included with iOS 8, the next iteration of Apple's mobile operating system. 

 

According to the website's sources, Healthbook will allow users to track a multitude of different health indicators (heart rate, blood sugar, sleep, nutrition, activity, etc.), each of which can be accessed through its own "card." The entire program seems to be designed for use with next-generation health-tracking sensors.

 

The app even features an "Emergency Card," which will allow users to enter their critical information such as blood type, organ donor status, allergies and medications for doctors and emergency medical technicians in case they are unable to speak in a health emergency.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Tracker tools that already exist, and an ICE variant.

 

Wow... :-/

 

Let's hope the 'next-generation health-tracking sensors' don't further reduce the already sketchy battery life of the iPhone.

 

There's really not much to get excited about here.

 

And, of course, its utility is predicated upon the ability of the user to be able to acquire their health data from external sources, as well as collect their own.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

"We need way more realistic visuals of care. Less stock photography, more painting. More involving regular people"

"We need way more realistic visuals of care. Less stock photography, more painting. More involving regular people" | Patient | Scoop.it

From  a HIStalk interview with Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday), founder of #TheWalkingGallery


Q: Putting patients at the center of healthcare is, unfortunately, a big change. For those overwhelmed by the long-term vision, what would be some short-term goals you would settle for?

 

"I often look at the intersection of health and art. That’s one of my focuses. We need way, way more realistic visuals of care. Less stock photography, more painting. More involving regular people into the life of your hospital. 

 

I would like to see patients — not just a patient advisory council at hospitals, which a lot of them have — on every board and council throughout the entire facility. I’m talking like EMR workflows as well as M&M reports. We need to be part of the conversation. Because what is absolutely beautiful if you do this is that patients can say things that staff can’t. Staff may be thinking it, but politically they’re put in a position where they can’t say it. Their job can be affected. We don’t want to rock the boat. 

 

Patients, not in a bad way, can say the words, since we’re not hired by the institution, that everybody might be thinking but don’t feel the power to say. Once we’ve said it, all of a sudden things break open. Doors break open and pathways change. 

 

One of the major things I would love to see is truly embracing us as part of the team. Not a token. Don’t have us design your lobby again. But really, seriously involve us in decision-making processes and get our feedback."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

90% of 18 to 24-year-olds trust medical info shared by others in their networks

90% of 18 to 24-year-olds trust medical info shared by others in their networks | Patient | Scoop.it

You'll find this and 23 other eyebrow-raising statistics by clicking on the title link above.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Is digital health helping or failing patients?

Is digital health helping or failing patients? | Patient | Scoop.it

The following comment from Marie Ennis-O'Connor (@jbbc) about the utility of apps in conversation with Fard Johnmar (@fardj) caught my eye:

 

"Despite rapid development the current level of functionality [in apps] is limited.

 

From a provider point of view, there is a lack of incentive to recommend them to patients, so patients have to navigate a maze of healthcare apps with little guidance.

 

From a payer perspective, there is unwillingness to consider providing reimbursement for apps without evidence that they bring clinical or cost benefit -- and to date there are minimal studies demonstrating efficacy"

 

Andrew Spong's insight:

Obviously, the picture changes from day to day. Overall, however, having landscaped the app environment for most disease areas over the past eighteen months or so, I can say with a degree of authority that the majority of high-ranking health apps are of poor or at best poor-to-moderate quality, and are of limited relevance and utility to patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Only 9% of European hospitals allow patients to access their electronic health records

Only 9% of European hospitals allow patients to access their electronic health records | Patient | Scoop.it

Some nice stats from two new Europa reports on the state of digital health in Europe:

 

According to two surveys in acute care hospitals (those intended for short-term medical or surgical treatment and care) and among General Practitioners (GPs) in Europe, the use of eHealth is starting to take off, with 60% of GPs using eHealth tools in 2013, up 50% since 2007. But much more needs to be done.

 

The main findings of the surveys include:

 

* Top performing countries for #eHealth uptake in hospitals are Denmark (66%), Estonia (63%), Sweden and Finland (both 62%). Full country profiles are available by clicking through on the title link above, then the embedded text in the second bulleted paragraph.

 

* eHealth services are still mostly used for traditional recording and reporting rather than for clinical purposes, such as holding consultations online (only 10% of GPs hold online consultations.

 

* When it comes to digitising patient health records, the Netherlands take the gold with 83.2% digitisation; with silver medal for Denmark (80.6%) and the UK taking home bronze (80.5%).

 

* However, only 9% of hospitals in Europe allow patients to access online their own medical records, and most of those only give partial access

 

* When adopting e-health, hospitals and GPs experience many barriers ranging from lack of interoperability to lack of regulatory framework and resources. 

 

 

more...
Kathi Apostolidis's curator insight, Today, 3:32 AM

In Greece, patients have legally the right to consult their medical record but many hospital administrations put obstacles. Lack of Interoperability is another ailment.

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Five ways in which social media can improve health outcomes for patients

Five ways in which social media can improve health outcomes for patients | Patient | Scoop.it

1. The conversation doesn’t have to end once the doctor walks out of the exam room.Patients see an immediate improvement in their quality of care when they can stay in contact with their physician after the appointment is over.  Conversations continue when doctors are able to post general knowledge about medications, side effects, treatment options, and disease prognoses. 

 

2. Patients feel empowered to manage their condition.  Through social media, patients can discuss their conditions and give one another advice on questions to ask their doctors, what treatments options are most helpful, and discuss health news relevant to their conditions.  This can all help a patient with a chronic condition feel as though he or she is not alone in their health journey.

 

3. Patients with similar conditions can discuss symptoms and compare treatment plans.  Participating in online discussions is especially important for patients who are unable to partake in face-to-face discussions with other patients because there either isn’t a physical support group, or the patient has mobility issues.  Having a community of similar patients helps us cope.

 

4. Having constant access to an online support community helps patients deal with chronic conditions and any complications that may accompany them.  Patients can share their concerns, inspire one another, and offer support.  The simple act of knowing we aren’t alone in a situation is itself a huge help.

 

5. Facilitates exchange of health knowledge and medical experience. Social media allows for constant sharing of information and experience, as well as providing a forum for doctors to answer questions, and post opinions on breaking health news.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The future of health

Andrew Spong's insight:

You've read it all before, but at least it's conveniently collated in a single document

more...
Stefano Viaggi's curator insight, April 14, 8:27 AM

Nice overview about what's going on in the health sector...

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Involving EU citizens in the management of their own health via mobile

Involving EU citizens in the management of their own health via mobile | Patient | Scoop.it

Jennifer Baker (@BrusselsGeek) is joined by Pia Ahrenkilde Hansen, spokeswoman of the European Commission, to discuss the Green Paper on mobile health (mHealth) due to be adopted on April 9.

 

mHealth covers support of mobile devices – such as smartphones, computers and tablets – that help to set up more independent management of patients’ health, explains Ahrenkilde Hansen. The spokeswoman of European Commission underlines that before putting these systems in place, it is important to have a clear view on how the issues of  data protection and users trust can be solved. A public consultation on mHealth will run until 2 July 2014.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

NHS England's health and social care digital service vision

NHS England's health and social care digital service vision | Patient | Scoop.it

The Health and Social Care Digital Services (HSCDS) represents the comprehensive and integrated digital health and social care service across England. This replaces the name “Integrated Customer Service Platform (ICSP).” HSCDS is a collective term for the patient and citizen facing digital propositions across health and care services. The HSCDS Online Channel represents the web service NHS Choices.

 

The Department of Health’s information strategy, The Power of Information, sets out a 10-year vision to transform information for health and care, underpinned by the Health and Social Care Act 2012. The strategy aims to drive integrated care across health and social care, reduce inequalities, increase transparency and create a culture of information sharing. Section 4.37 calls for the development of an easily accessible and open high quality national information portal across health, public health and social care, that not only radically simplifies information but positions information as a health and care service in its own right.

 

The development of the HSCDS represents an innovative opportunity to deliver value and customer excellence to patients and citizens, transform health and care services and develop the single largest health and care information service. We can empower patients and the public to live longer and healthier lives through the use of relevant, personalised and cost effective digital channels for their health and care needs.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

UCL Festival for Digital Health

UCL Festival for Digital Health | Patient | Scoop.it
Andrew Spong's insight:

The UCL Festival for Digital Health 2014 aims to:

 

DISCOVER: new innovations from domains of nanotechnology, EPRs, social media, mobile technology, games, self-tracking devices and apps revolutionizing delivery of healthcareSHARE: research, clinical, business and policy achievements from UCL and UCLPNETWORK: with staff and students across UCL, UCLP, industry, SMEs, policy makers and healthcare professionalsCREATE: new interdisciplinary collaborations across Faculties and disciplines and sectors
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The digitisation of healthcare

The digitisation of healthcare | Patient | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Identifying accessibility gaps in healthcare

Identifying accessibility gaps in healthcare | Patient | Scoop.it

Click on the Scoop.it title link above to be taken to the deck (53 slides).

 

Kindly shared by the author @KelSmith

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

5 ways online patient communities benefit the healthcare ecosystem

5 ways online patient communities benefit the healthcare ecosystem | Patient | Scoop.it

Similar to their growing impact on other industries, social networks are playing an important role in healthcare and Online Patient Communities (OPCs) are one such consequence. While patient support groups have been there for a long time, online communities are a very recent phenomenon and have several advantages over support groups.

 

1.    OPCs remove the physical barriers

2.   OPCs are more conducive to participation from healthcare professionals.

3.   Caregivers are more inclined to participate in OPCs.

4.   OPCs are a great source of information and aid in patient empowerment

5.   OPCs are more than chat rooms. They have other healthcare applications too

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper

Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper | Patient | Scoop.it

Conclusions of the first ever cross-stakeholder, pan-european seminar on health apps, held at the King's Fund on 28 October 2013.

 

Direct download from Alex Wyke's blog: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xt6oh78wpn4b1ef/MASTER%20A4%20WHITE%20PAPER%20PDF.pdf

 

The five key messages:

 

1. Overhauling healthcare systems–making them patient-centric

2. Engaging doctors in the prescribing of health apps
3. Overseeing quality standards for health apps
4. Ensuring that health apps remain of a high standard throughout their lifetime
5. Considerations for policymakers wishing to oversee health apps

Andrew Spong's insight:

My POV:

 

1. Lip-service has been given to this idea since time immemorial, but there are few examples of such change having not only been instantiated, but maintained, and used to drive strategic direction. This is a systemic problem which I don't think will be resolved until we accept that 'reskinning' existing structures is inadequate to the needs of truly patient-centred healthcare design.

 

2. Unenforceable, but necessary. A paradox that may only be resolved through cross-constituency digital peer-review (imagine the degree of insight and involvement if there were a '#FOAMed meets #bcsm' for every disease area)

 

3. See above. 'Regulation' as we understand it will neither be viable, nor enforceable. Whether we want a 'top layer' of heavy-hitting health faculty acting as a secondary filter before content enters the App Store (Apple) and Play (Google) is another question. I'm not sure if it's even a good idea (re-replacing 'evidence with eminence' again) unless it's largely automated using a Watson-like AI with a complete picture of the existing gold standard in all evidence.

 

4. Predicated upon the expectation that they're of a high standard at launch, which simply isn't the case.. The majority of health-related content available as apps is of low quality and relevance.

 

5. Re. the first paragraph of the synopsis of this section: 'The consensus at the seminar was that the adoption of smartphone technology will not create health inequalities, but rather can increase healthcare sustainability'. I strongly agree with this line of reasoning, and feel that the 'digital divide' debate needs to be answered once and for all.

 

My answer to this last point: principally, this is a period of transition, and no plans should be made to accommodate perceived (and usually unsubstantiated) inequalities in terms of access to health information which will diminish over time -- although NB levels of health literacy are another matter. Where digital exclusion exists (and such conclusions often overlook the 'one step removed' access to digital health via family members, friends, and carers) the savings made from the efficient implementation of lower-cost digital health initiatives (and there really should be some; if there aren't, questions need to be asked about the organisation under review) should be reinvested in targeting hard-to-reach communities in an offline setting.

more...
rob halkes's curator insight, March 18, 6:25 AM

Great Read!

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, March 21, 2:55 PM

Aportes y conclusiones del primer seminario pan-europeo sobre apps de salud. Muy interesante.

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Digital health: an 'engaged patient's point of view

Digital health: an 'engaged patient's point of view | Patient | Scoop.it

Anna McCollister-Slipp lives with type 1 diabetes.

 

Her overall opinion regarding the digital health tools she uses to manage her disease?

 

They're frustrating.

 

Anna explains:

 

“So I have all of this incredible information literally 24/7 – not just from my prescription medical devices – but also from my Fitbit, from a Bluetooth blood pressure monitor, from my digital scale and from a variety of different iPhone apps that are used for nutrition tracking etc.

 

None of it connects.

 

They’re all in completely different data streams, and even though each of them provides something that would be an incredibly vital element for me to truly understand how to manage my disease, how to predict when I need to change insulin in response to exercise, or stress, or schedule changes, or whatever the case may be – I can’t get that information all in one place. Even though it’s electronic – even though it’s all downloadable in one form or another – it’s all on different platforms, different computing systems and it doesn’t work together.”

 

“So it’s incredibly frustrating that we’ve invested so much as a society and as a country and as a patient community and a medical device industry in creating this incredible technology that really does save lives and support lives but we can’t do this one tiny little thing – just to make the data standards consistent – to make them interoperable – to give me the ability to make the decisions that I need to make to manage my disease 24/7"

more...
No comment yet.