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Rescooped by Ginny Dillon from 4- PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT by PHARMAGEEK
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Half of Americans don't get a second opinion

Half of Americans don't get a second opinion | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Getting another doctor's view can dramatically change a treatment plan and even a diagnosis — research finds it happens in as many as 30 percent of cases.

Via Best Doctors, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Second opinion ... What's your inclination?

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eMedToday's curator insight, June 9, 2013 4:45 PM

Shocking

 

"As we discovered, getting another doctor's view can dramatically change a treatment plan and even a diagnosis — research finds it happens in as many as 30% of cases. In one particularly dramatic finding recently published in the journal Cancer, the recommendations for surgery changed for more than half of breast cancer patients who received a second opinion. In some cases, previously undiagnosed second tumors"


Think about the power of a hospial have a mobile app. A patients on their smartphone looks up another doctor in 2 seconds and makes schedules a visit. And the patients looks up their medical condition one of the top medical reference books like the Mayo Clinic.


Wow

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Consumer Reports becomes a resource for doctor-shopping | Health Populi

Consumer Reports becomes a resource for doctor-shopping | Health Populi | patient engaged | Scoop.it

There’s a long-held belief among us long-time health industry analysts that Americans spend more time shopping around for cars and washing machines than for health plans and doctors. Consumer Reports is betting that’s going to change, now that Consumers Union has decided to lend its valuable, trusted brand to developing report cards on physicians, having already rated hospitals and heart surgeons.

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Startup iVinci raises $5M to make healthcare billing more consumer friendly

Startup iVinci raises $5M to make healthcare billing more consumer friendly | patient engaged | Scoop.it
With the push toward consumer-friendly efforts in healthcare, could healthcare billing be the next area of focus? At least one company, iVinci Health, is attempting to do just that, and it closed $5 million in new funding earlier this month.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Wow! Good luck. We need this ...

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The rise of the digital patient (Infographic) | Integrated Care Today

The rise of the digital patient (Infographic) | Integrated Care Today | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Take a look at this infographic from CDW Healthcare to see how American's are adopting technology to improve their health.

Via VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Ginny Dillon's insight:

So much technology. It's a great opportunity for patients.

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Not Running a Hospital: A terrible burden imposed on doctors

Not Running a Hospital: A terrible burden imposed on doctors | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Pay very close attention ...

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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, September 19, 7:59 PM

What Doctors Feel ... We all should care.

Thanks you Danielle Ofri, MD.

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19 ways to help someone with cancer - Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

19 ways to help someone with cancer - Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Highly useful advice for those of us wanting to help friends and family diagnosed with cancer.

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Making patient engagement meaningful (to the doctor) | mHealthNews

Making patient engagement meaningful (to the doctor) | mHealthNews | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Glen Tullman's new company - Livongo - seeks to empower those with chronic conditions and bring providers into the loop only when they're needed.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Livingo founder says patients with diabetes don't want to do more, they want to do less so they can live their lives. For doctors. The question remains, will the app empower diabetics, help them control blood sugar and result in less need to contact their physician or healthcare provider?

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Meet ONC's new patient engagement lead | Government Health IT

Meet ONC's new patient engagement lead | Government Health IT | patient engaged | Scoop.it
The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has a new head for its Consumer eHealth division: Lana Moriarty. She succeeds Lygeia Ricciardi, who pioneered the position in 2012. Ricciardi stepped down earlier this summer; Moriarty, who was appointed Sept.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Good luck with helping ONC with the goal of increasing consumer engagement and fostering stronger patient-provider partnerships!!

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Big housing crunch faces Baby Boomers

Big housing crunch faces Baby Boomers | patient engaged | Scoop.it
America's Baby Boomers are facing a housing crunch, with many expected to struggle to afford their homes come retirement.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Housing is related to healthcare. Housing first. Healthcare after. Houston we have a problem!

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The Genius of Marian | POV | PBS

The Genius of Marian | POV | PBS | patient engaged | Scoop.it
When Pam White is diagnosed at age 61 with early-onset Alzheimer’s, her family grapples with the disease alongside her, and her eldest son attempts to recover her memories by recording conversations in this visually rich, poignant film.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Compelling. Available on PBS thru October 8, 2014.

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Dear New Doctor... - Assessment 2020

Dear New Doctor... - Assessment 2020 | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Some suggestions for doctors encountering new patients, from their point of view.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

The Internet has made it possible for patients to research and connect, learn and share. Not just listening to, but actually hearing the patient's voice is an essential part of the physician-patient relationship.

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Joan Rivers's Death | Healthcare and Risk Lessons | HealthWorks Collective

Joan Rivers's Death | Healthcare and Risk Lessons | HealthWorks Collective | patient engaged | Scoop.it
With deepest respect for Ms. Joan Rivers, her death is a reminder that there is no such thing as a minor medical procedure. With any medical procedure or treatment there is always some risk, and that risk becomes even greater for patients who must spend time in a hospital.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

A Physician's Welcomed Advice ...

 

Never stay a single day longer in a hospital than you need to be there. The longer you stay, the greater the risk—for infection, medical error, or something worse.

Don’t be afraid to speak up. If you don’t understand why a test is being done, why a medication is being administered, why a pill looks unfamiliar, or anything else, call a time out. You’d be surprised how many times a patient or a family member who speaks up can prevent a medical error from happening.

Always ask about, and understand, the risks and benefits of a medical procedure or treatment before you go through with it. If you feel you’re not capable of understanding this, ask a family member to be there with you and help you decide.

Follow instructions implicitly. Both before and after a medical or surgical intervention, be an engaged patient. This is not the time to make up your own rules, or do whatever you want. Whether it’s changing a dressing, taking a medication, getting out of bed, or following up with your doctor, please do what you’ve been told to do, and if you question any instructions you’ve been given, let your doctor know.

Be clear about advance directives and have a living will. Chances are everything will be OK. But if something unforeseen happens, make sure your doctor and family members understand your wishes about such things as life support, artificial ventilation, feeding tubes, quality of life, etc.

 


 

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A Woman Told Her Boss About A Devastating Cancer Diagnosis. He Responded By Firing Her.

A Woman Told Her Boss About A Devastating Cancer Diagnosis. He Responded By Firing Her. | patient engaged | Scoop.it
A Pennsylvania community is rallying around a woman who was fired from her job at an oral surgeon's office following her diagnosis with cancer.

Carol Jumper, who lives in Hopewell Township, Pennsylvania, was diagnosed with cancer impacting her pa...
Ginny Dillon's insight:

There are no words ... speechless?

Thoughts and prayers Carol Jumper.

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Share Your Bill, Make Health Costs Transparent in California

Share Your Bill, Make Health Costs Transparent in California | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Contribute -- and look up -- prices for common medical procedures statewide.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Wow! This could be the start of something really beneficial for patients when it comes to "price transparency".  There is a wide range of pricing for the same procedure, medical test, surgery and hospital stay even within the same geographical area.

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The Day When Our Antibiotics Stop Working Is Coming Very Soon

The Day When Our Antibiotics Stop Working Is Coming Very Soon | patient engaged | Scoop.it
We are close to entering a "post-antibiotic era." It's not a place we want to go.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Alarms are going off all over healthcare. Patients need to get this too. 

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ePatients and Trends Changing Health Care

ePatients and Trends Changing Health Care | patient engaged | Scoop.it

The concept of the ePatient - someone who is equipped, enabled and empowered by digital technology and social networks to make better decisions about their health care (and that of their loved ones) - is no longer a novelty. We have become increasingly familiar with the term and its leading proponents over the past few years.  What is perhaps more novel is the idea that the ePatient of the future will be the norm rather than the exception.

New technologies will enable all of us to monitor our health and gather sophisticated data which in turn will empower us to interact with our healthcare providers in a partnership.  Forced to increasingly take responsibility for our own care in a complex system, digitally savvy health consumers will combine information from doctors, the Web, electronic medical records and other sources to “hack” the health system to educate ourselves, navigate loopholes and ultimately get better, lower cost and faster care.

How this will come about is the subject of a new book by Rohit Bhargava (author of Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action) and healthcare futurist Fard Johnmar.  Featuring original research and stories of healthcare innovators from across the world, ePatient 2015: 15 Surprising Trends Changing Health Care acts as a guide to the rapid changes taking place in health. It shares 15 trends that are poised to fundamentally change the way health and medical care is delivered and received in the near future.

I recently interviewed Fard Johnmar on the main themes presented in the book. I started by asking him what he thinks is the biggest challenge facing health care today? 

F.J. This is a tough question.  Especially because there are so many issues facing healthcare globally. Many people would point to rising health costs — especially in the United States — and lack of access to high-quality care as being significant problems.  I agree with this assessment.  Yet, there are two under-reported, but equally as important issues in healthcare: a lack of personalization and the profound isolation that people who fall ill face — whether they have mental or physical illnesses.  In many parts of the world, particularly in Western countries, individuality and autonomy is highly prized.  Yet, people entering health systems are often transformed from individual actors to cogs in the medical machine.  Sometimes this is necessary, as standards of care allow doctors to treat patients based on sound science and medical practice.  But it also has negative consequences, especially in cases where personalizing therapy is highly beneficial. In terms of social isolation, this is an even more significant problem.  As familial and cultural support structures have eroded and the cultural stigma associated with being sick in public continues, people facing illness sometime find themselves with few allies. Fortunately, people in the global health industry recognize these issues and are developing — and using — a range of innovations designed to drive greater personalization and help patients forge connections with others facing illness and those seeking to support them. 

Q.  In your book you identify 15 trends that you observe in health care today. These are propelled by three overarching themes – can you tell us a little more about these themes?

The themes you referred to are Health HyperEfficency, the Personalized Health Movement and Digital Peer-to-Peer Healthcare.  As we mapped out the trends described in the book, we found they naturally aligned with three reactions to problems facing health care, which I noted above:  

Ever-increasing health costsLimited social supportGeneric, or non-personalized medicine  

Health HyperEfficency refers to a range of technologies and techniques which promise — via greater computing power, better human-machine interfaces and other innovations — to help us reduce health spending.  Of particular interest is our growing ability to predict whether and how people will get sick in the future.  If we can work with people to stave off illness, this will reduce costs significantly while improving health and wellbeing.   

The Personalized Health Movement refers to the use of innovations in the analog and digital realm, from genomics to food advocacy, that will help people do everything from receive medications tailored to their genetic profile to taking more control of the food they put into their bodies every day.  It’s all about providing people with tools that enable them to receive high-quality, but individualized care. 

Digital Peer-to-Peer Healthcare is inspired by a concept promoted by my friend Susannah Fox of the Pew Research Center: that we are living in an era where we have the ability to forge human to human connections in ways that were not possible in the past. 

Q. Can you explain to us what you mean by the term "carehacking"?

As we looked at how people were using technologies and tools available to them to better understand their bodies, we realized that a great term to describe this activity would be carehacking.  Traditionally, health systems have been like impenetrable black boxes, where people had little understanding of their treatments, the data collected from their bodies and more.  In some respects, you could almost describe the situation as akin to modern computer programs, where most people have no understanding about what’s behind the magic taking place on the screen. Decades past, many using personal computers had to understand how to manipulate, or hack them, them at code level, to make things happen. We’re now seeing people learn a lot more about the “programs,” data and interactions that make health systems tick.  They are using this knowledge to hack the system to do everything from navigate the evolving health insurance landscape to help doctors manage their cancer care. 

Q. As we collect more health data it is raising many new privacy and security concerns. Are patients sufficiently aware of the issues surrounding the ethics and privacy of their health data being collected and analysed by app developers, websites and insurers? How can they protect themselves?  

No, people are not aware of the scope of health data being collected about them, how vulnerable it is to attack and the consequences of health data breeches. At this stage, knowledge is the best protection — especially as it relates to sharing health data via the social Web and mobile devices.  

Q. As more of us turn to wearable computers to monitor our health, and the data becomes more sophisticated, are we in danger of becoming overwhelmed or immobilized by all the information we gather?

Absolutely.  In fact, the issue of health data overload is certainly not a new one.  Just ask anyone who has turned to Dr. Google to learn about their symptoms or a new diagnosis. Sifting through millions of irrelevant search results is no picnic.  What’s changing is that innovators are producing a range of tools and technologies that provide people with much more access to highly sophisticated health data.  While the flood of information is increasing exponentially, we’re not seeing enough serious efforts to help people not only make sense of this data, but turn it into action.  Non-actionable health data is worse than useless.  

Q How will all of this affect doctor/patient relationships? Are health care providers ready for the patient of the future?

During the dawn of the Internet age, physicians were caught off guard by the rise of the patient Googler.  Today, some doctors are still not comfortable with the fact that patients research their health conditions online and ask many questions based on what they have learned. Today, innovators, entrepreneurs and others are busy introducing innovations that have the potential to upend doctor-patient relations in ways we could only imagine during the Internet era.  As I discussed in this recent essay published on KevinMD, many doctors are simply not prepared for the next generation of technology-empowered patients.  

Q While the digital future is an exciting one, it is not without pitfalls. What potential problems lie ahead for us if we don’t pay heed to them now?  

If I could pick one issue we need to address it would be this: The need to move from health knowledge to health wisdom.  As humans, it’s in our nature to race ahead with little heed to the consequences associated with the innovations we develop.  For example, we can see this happening in the area of genetics.  We’re gathering more data about the link (or lack thereof) between our genetic code and disease.  We’re providing this information to the public, but paying less attention to helping people make sense of this information and — more importantly — make better decisions based on genetic data.  Engaging in paternalistic efforts to prevent people from accessing medical knowledge is certainly a bad idea.  But, providing people with information is only the first step. We need to help people become wiser health data consumers and do more to ensure they make sound decisions based on information they access and receive.

 


Via Plus91
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Educated, Engaged, Empowered patients!

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The Empowered ePatient Movement

The Empowered ePatient Movement | patient engaged | Scoop.it
With patient-centric health apps, pricing transparency, and patient technology advancements in hospitals, the e-patient movement is pushing full speed ahead with no sign of weakening.

Via VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Empowered patients any day over those who are disengaged.

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Your Surgeon Seems Qualified, but Can He Type?

Your Surgeon Seems Qualified, but Can He Type? | patient engaged | Scoop.it
My inability to type has become a funny, disarming moment in an otherwise usually serious encounter between surgeon and patient, helping to mitigate some of the tension that can develop.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

A great surgeon but typing skill ... not so much ...

I'll take the great surgeon over the typist any day.

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To reduce medical errors, doctor-author explains the need to undo toxic culture of perfection

To reduce medical errors, doctor-author explains the need to undo toxic culture of perfection | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Danielle Ofri, a doctor at Bellvue Medical Center at New York University and author, stressed the need for more transparent reporting system for medical errors.
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The elephant in the room. To reduce medical errors, doctor-author explains the need to undo toxic culture of perfection

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Infographic: 12 ways to put patients first in healthcare | mHealthNews

Infographic: 12 ways to put patients first in healthcare | mHealthNews | patient engaged | Scoop.it
The Innovation HealthJam, a 3-day virtual brainstorm, identified potential solutions for some of the most pressing issues in healthcare today.
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HealthJam collaborated on ideas how to improve the patient experience.

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Making patients the 'hub' of their own healthcare | Government Health IT

Making patients the 'hub' of their own healthcare | Government Health IT | patient engaged | Scoop.it
National Health IT Week is officially underway in Washington, DC, and it's only fitting that interoperability and patient engagement are the primary themes being discussed.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

YES!  "Patient empowerment is a living, breathing, evolving thing. It looks different for each of us, and it can change with time and by disease and severity,"

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The Future Doctor Will Be A Moderator, Not A Sage: Change Is On The Way

The Future Doctor Will Be A Moderator, Not A Sage: Change Is On The Way | patient engaged | Scoop.it
There is a great article in The Irish Times about what the roles of future doctors should be. They quoted Dr. Eric Topol, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian and me based on my new book, The Guide to the Future ...
Ginny Dillon's insight:

As an educated, proactive  patient, your voice increasingly counts in the medical community.

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Hacking home health care

Hacking home health care | patient engaged | Scoop.it
We need to fix the "solved problems" crisis in home health care. Let me explain. At the start of Health Foo* in December, everyone introduced themselves in 6 words or less. Row by row, person by pe...
Ginny Dillon's insight:

I'm a huge fan of Susannah Fox. Are you a caregiver to a loved one who is challenged with a serious illness? If so, read this and follow Susannah. Her creative contributions are endless.

 

 

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Our unrealistic views of death, through a doctor’s eyes

Our unrealistic views of death, through a doctor’s eyes | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Sometimes medical care can amount to torture.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

A Physician's perspective on the end of life.  Not an easy topic but everyone should read this.

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One Way to Cut Back on Expensive Ambulance Rides

One Way to Cut Back on Expensive Ambulance Rides | patient engaged | Scoop.it
A Colorado town is minimizing ER visits with an urgent-care clinic on wheels.
Ginny Dillon's insight:

Not everyone who calls an ambulance actually needs to go to the Emergency Room. This is a great idea!

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More Than 750 Hospitals Face Medicare Crackdown on Patient Injuries - US News

More Than 750 Hospitals Face Medicare Crackdown on Patient Injuries - US News | patient engaged | Scoop.it
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Here's one huge reason why you need to be an educated, engaged patient: In 2012, one out of every eight patients nationally suffered a potentially avoidable complication during a hospital stay.

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Patient Power 2014 Survey Results Summary

Patient Power 2014 Survey Results Summary | patient engaged | Scoop.it
Nearly 1300 visitors told us how they use the Web to search for health information
Ginny Dillon's insight:

2014 Patient Power Survey Results are in. Cancer patient"s use of the internet for medical information. How it impacts care.

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