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Patient Information
Articles and discussions on healthcare information & patient engagement.
Relevant to Hospitals, Physicians, Healthcare Organsiations, Pharma, Insurance.
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Are physicians ready for the e-patient movement?

Are physicians ready for the e-patient movement? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

I gave a talk recently to a group of my peers about addressing the needs of patients after a diagnosis of cancer, emphasizing points where transitions occur — from treatment, to end of therapy, surveillance, recurrence, and extending all the way up to the end of life — and how important it is to consider the entire journey of a person with cancer, from patient to survivor.


One of my goals of this talk was to address the need for oncologists to engage those actually diagnosed with cancer, the most interested of the “stakeholders.” I asked my colleagues if they had heard of a movement afoot in medicine, that of patient engagement, and whether they knew of folks like David deBronkart (alias e-Patient Dave). I was met with a few nods, but mostly none had heard of either. In truth, I was surprised to see that the patient engagement movement had not achieved greater familiarity with my audience.


Read more: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/02/physicians-ready-epatient-movement.html

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4 Tech Trends That Will Increase Patient Engagement in 2014

4 Tech Trends That Will Increase Patient Engagement in 2014 | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Improvements in healthcare information technology in the last decade have led to a fundamental shift in the way healthcare providers operate. The use of electronic health records is now widespread and healthcare professionals have access to immense amounts of data. While technology has improved clinical performance in many ways, patient engagement has certainly suffered a setback.


Today’s healthcare professionals are tied to technology. Whether documenting care at a computer terminal or looking up patient history on a tablet, clinicians are left with less time to engage directly with patients. In fact, data entry can take up to one-third of a clinician’s day.


Clinicians want to spend more time interacting with patients versus engaging with technology, and patients deserve it. By increasing the time spent working with and educating patients, clinicians can improve patient satisfaction, increase Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS®) survey scores, and provide a better overall patient experience.


Read more: http://hin.com/blog/2014/02/13/guest-post-4-tech-trends-that-will-increase-patient-engagement-in-2014/

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Infographic: 7 Reasons to Engage Patients Before Their Appointments

Infographic: 7 Reasons to Engage Patients Before Their Appointments | Patient Information | Scoop.it
This infographic provides 7 ways to boost patient engagement prior to their appointments.
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Video: A Patient's View of Using Social Media #hcsm

Kelly English is a consumer/patient living in British Columbia, Canada, with rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes. She is a social media enthusiast who h...
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Tips for Finding Reliable Health Information Online

Tips for Finding Reliable Health Information Online | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Finding accurate, reliable, and current health information online can be difficult and overwhelming. The Internet has a wealth of health information—some information is true and accurate, and some is not.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when visiting a website:

  • Websites should have a way to contact the organization or webmaster. If the site provides no contact information or it is not clear who runs the site, use caution.
  • Beware of claims that offer one cure for a variety of illnesses, like a breakthrough or secret ingredient.
  • Look for latest findings from research, not an individual’s opinion.
  • And, always remember to write down questions to bring to doctor visits.


Read more: http://homedialyzorsunited.org/tips-for-finding-reliable-health-information-online/

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Google Glass and Patient Engagement – Is This a Match Made in Heaven?

Google Glass and Patient Engagement – Is This a Match Made in Heaven? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Being a medical professional, Glass Explorer and the co-founder of a healthcare data company, when a new technology is launched I immediately think…  How can we use this to improve healthcare? How can we use the data and the information the technology enables to better connect the healthcare community?


The launch of Google Glass had myself – and many other healthcare professionals - asking just these questions. It’s been exciting to watch the uptake of Glass in the medical space. Despite the privacy concerns people are exploring ways to use the technology to improve healthcare.

InCrowd is active in the patient engagement space; we have been asking our Crowds of healthcare professionals and health consumers to share their feedback on the current state of patient engagement. The findings have been eye opening and I think point to the need for significant change in the way healthcare is provided. Technology will certainly play a role in these changes, as will digital natives who can easily envision a tech enabled future.


Our work in the patient engagement space naturally lead me to wonder how Google Glass could be used as a tool to enhance engagement. As I thought about the feedback shared by the Millennials and Gen Xers, I put together a list of ways I could see Glass enhancing patient engagement.


Read more: http://www.incrowdnow.com/2014/02/google-glass-and-patient-engagement-a-match-made-in-heaven/

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Is Patient Engagement Helping Physicians?

Is Patient Engagement Helping Physicians? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Advances in technology have increased manifolds. At the click of a single button, we can access real-time information on Twitter, Facebook and Google. The amount of information present online is huge – from celebrity gossip to patient communication channels. This is how technology is shaping up our world.


Do you ever feel that you just want to isolate yourself from the technology around you? I bet you do. It happens with me all the time. I also believe that information overload leads to an increase in patient anxiety and physician stress by a great deal. Let me explain how.


Our brains are inundated with such a huge amount of information every day that I am not sure they can stay up to speed. I wouldn’t blame them for being unable to, and since we are deriving this information voluntarily, we end up wanting even more. This is the sort of addiction patients are also getting used to – even myself.


Read more: http://blog.curemd.com/is-patient-engagement-helping-physicians/

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6 Steps You Can Take to Help Patients With Low Health Literacy

6 Steps You Can Take to Help Patients With Low Health Literacy | Patient Information | Scoop.it

1. Identify 1 or more health literacy champions and/or a health literacy committee.

Consider being the champion within your organization to help lead the efforts and help raise health literacy awareness, or think about someone else who might be great in the role. Depending on resources available and priority of efforts perhaps put together a committee who can focus on assessing, evaluating and improving health literacy within your organization/practice.


2. Evaluate existing patient education materials and patient forms for health literacy principles.

Another important step is doing a basic review of existing materials, including handouts and intake forms. Having health-literate materials on hand will set you up to provide a better patient experience from the get-go.


3. Develop and select patient education using health literacy principles.

The speakers identified several key principles for evaluating whether materials are easy to understand and use. For instance, they said that content should be easy-to-read and focused on problem-solving, with an uncluttered design. Also, visuals should be used for emphasis, and patients depicted should represent the target audience engaged in healthy behaviors.


4. Assess your environment for health literacy and set goals for what can be improved. 

Even just coming into your practice office may create more of a barrier than you may realize. Try to approach your practice with a low-literacy patient in mind. Is the building clearly marked? Are signs clear? If you’re located within a hospital or clinic, can the patient find his or her way back out of building or to the next appointment? Now, most important, what can you do to make improvements?


5. Provide staff training to build health literacy awareness and skills. 

Whether you’re the self-elected health literacy champion or part of a health literacy committee, you can’t go it alone. Incorporate health literacy awareness into your annual training plans if at all possible.


6. Leverage existing tools and resources! 

Meeting the needs of patients with low health literacy levels may seem overwhelming, but there are plenty of great resources out there. To get started, check out our Health Literacy Tools article, where you’ll find links to lots of external resources.


Read more: http://surroundhealth.net/Topics/Education-and-Learning-approaches/Health-literacy/Articles/6-Steps-You-Can-Take-to-Help-Patients-With-Low-Hea.aspx

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Engaging Patients vs. Patient Engagement

Engaging Patients vs. Patient Engagement | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Patient engagement today is often being used as a technology initiative, whether it be through a CRM or an integrated marketing campaign using traditional and digital means, or even with outbound surveys and risk assessments given to patients regarding their care. No matter how you slice it, it seems that the conversation of “patient engagement” is more about the tool than the technique.


It is with a humble approach to listening, learning from, and understanding how and when patients need information, resources, and care–and then delivering the right message and support along the way which fosters better patient engagement.


The Irony of Patient Engagement

It’s almost ironic that we use the words “patient engagement” to increase the interaction “they” have with their respective healthcare providers and plans. Patients are engaged. They are engaged with their families, they are engaged with their work-life balance, and they are engaged with their care. However, for a number of years, many health institutions and insurance plans did not interact with their patients and members unless it was initiated by the patient or care provider, such as “Dr. Mom.”


Read more: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-today/article/engaging-patients-vs.-patient-engagement

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The Awakening of the e-Patient: Are We Prepared to Engage?

The Awakening of the e-Patient: Are We Prepared to Engage? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

I gave a talk recently to a group of my peers about addressing the needs of patients after a diagnosis of cancer, emphasizing points where transitions occur—from treatment, to end of therapy, surveillance, recurrence, and extending all the way up to the end of life—and how important it is to consider the entire journey of a person with cancer, from patient to survivor.


One of my goals of this talk was to address the need for oncologists to engage those actually diagnosed with cancer, the most interested of the “stakeholders.” I asked my colleagues if they had heard of a movement afoot in medicine, that of patient engagement, and whether they knew of folks like David deBronkart (alias e-Patient Dave). I was met with a few nods, but mostly none had heard of either. In truth, I was surprised to see that the patient engagement movement had not achieved greater familiarity with my audience.   


On Google, the term “patient engagement” brings up over 48 million hits. There are even organizations that aim to spur on this evolution in medical care, such as theSociety of Participatory Medicine and the Center for Advancing Health. Patients who are engaged are often termed “e-patients.”  They have turned to the Internet to learn about their afflictions, read up on biology, treatments available, etc. They are interested in determining for themselves where to go for the best care, including what treatments are undergoing investigation. Indeed, they are demanding bettercare, and a more active role in their own treatment, as well as for those they love and advocate for.


Read more: http://connection.asco.org/Commentary/Article/id/3776/The-Awakening-of-the-ePatient-Are-We-Prepared-to-Engage.aspx

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5 tactics to enrich patient engagement

5 tactics to enrich patient engagement | Patient Information | Scoop.it

1. Foster a strong doctor-patient relationship

Fostering trust and open communication is critical to keeping patients invested in their care. Patients need to feel comfortable, believing the physician truly understands them and their healthcare goals. While this may seem obvious, it is not always easy to accomplish. One way to build strong doctor-patient relationships is to put policies in place that cultivate regular interactions. For instance, a practice could implement scheduling protocols that ensure patients see their primary care physician whenever they make an appointment. In some cases this may require slightly delaying the appointment, but the benefits of having a patient connect with someone with whom they have a rapport can often outweigh the benefits of being seen immediately.


2. Encourage team-based care

Just as important as the doctor-patient relationship are the interactions between the patient and support staff, including medical assistants and nurses. Assigning specific staff members to a particular physician can ensure patients become as comfortable with the support staff as they are with the doctor. Depending on the issue, a patient may even feel more at ease asking questions of the nurse or medical assistant.


3. Make specialists part of the care team

When a patient sees a specialist outside of the practice, a communication breakdown can occur, especially if the patient doesn’t understand exactly what happened during the specialist appointment or lacks clear direction around the next steps for care. What’s more, if a primary physician sees the patient before the specialist has a chance to send a report about the visit, the primary physician may be put in the difficult position of answering patient questions about an appointment of which he or she has little information. To address this challenge, Desert Ridge uses a texting solution that allows the primary provider to send a secure text to the specialist to seek answers to patient questions, often receiving a response before the patient leaves the primary physician’s office. This real-time communication permits all three parties to been the same page about the patient’s care.


4. Make care accessible

It almost goes without saying that the easier it is to get an appointment or obtain answers to health questions, the more patients will interact with their healthcare provider. As such, same day/next day scheduling is particularly effective in increasing patient satisfaction and engagement. Desert Ridge offers same day/next day scheduling for all types of appointments, such as wellness checks, sick visits and chronic disease management. Being accessible when the patient needs their physician is critical to the relationship and this open-access scheduling system enables patients to seek care and advice from their physician, rather than alternative places for medical care, such as retail clinics.


5. Fully leverage a patient portal

Patients can use a portal to receive test results and request refills at their convenience. They can also use the portal to ask questions directly to their providers or care team, instead of making a telephone call. The physicians at Desert Ridge have all observed that email is far more efficient than telephone calls for routine inquiries, and the quality of messaging has improved.


Read more: http://m.physbiztech.com/best-practices/5-tactics-enrich-patient-engagement

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Infographic: Seniors Remain Receptive to #mHealth

Infographic: Seniors Remain Receptive to #mHealth | Patient Information | Scoop.it
Contrary to conventional wisdom, mHealth isn't exclusively a young person's industry. In fact, seniors remain increasingly receptive to mobile health
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Patient's Urgent and Ongoing Search for Cancer Information

Patient's Urgent and Ongoing Search for Cancer Information | Patient Information | Scoop.it

As we have written many times here, the pace of research and discovery in many cancer types is accelerating. I wish it was for all cancers, but I take heart in that it is for some. Two of which I have: CLL and myelofibrosis. I thought I was in the minority of people who are on a daily quest for “what’s new.” But a preliminary look at the results from our ongoing Patient Power 2014 Survey shows I am far from alone. Many patients today not only seek information at time of diagnosis, they continue to seek information daily, or even weekly, for as long as 10 years after their diagnosis. The quest is ongoing, especially in areas where there is the sense that things are changing. Much of the quest is online, but it is also the willingness to make an extraordinary effort to attend in-person educational events – to meet others and hear from experts. This weekend, I am the host of such an event for CLL patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. We thought 75-150 people would attend. But close to 350 plan to. To make sure we had enough room, we asked whether some of the people who registered weeks ago now have had a change of plans. Nobody has. I believe there is an expanding percentage of patients who have taken on the responsibility of understanding and managing their illness and not just leave the decisions to their doctor. Yay!


There are lessons in all this. First, doctors had better be prepared for educated questions and they better have informed answers. Second, the medical industry had better support high-speed, independent channels that inform and empower patients. Industry is either prohibited by law in some quarters from doing that, or by their own onerous regulatory processes. I understand their limits, it just flies in the face of what today’s patients want and expect.


Read more: http://healthworkscollective.com/andrew-schorr/147581/patient-s-urgent-and-ongoing-search-cancer-information

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Can a patient share too much health information online?

On February 11th the #hcldr (healthcare leaders) community got together on our weekly tweetchat to talk about healthcare privacy. The first question generated a lot of interesting ideas and comments.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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How Does Patient Engagement Help in Quality Care?

How Does Patient Engagement Help in Quality Care? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Globally, industries spend millions trying to listen to the ‘voice of the customer’, and understand their needs. They then spend millions more in analyzing the information they have collected, understanding what the customer needs and then tailoring a product or service that will perfectly mirror that need.


An exception is the healthcare industry, where the primary mover is not the consumer, but the provider. This is despite major studies and research establishing that patient engagement is the key to better and more effective healthcare.


Read more: http://suyati.com/how-patient-engagement-helps-quality-care/

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Twitter Empowers Patients to Seek and to Speak Out

Twitter Empowers Patients to Seek and to Speak Out | Patient Information | Scoop.it

The ability to write something meaningful in140 characters, including a shortened URL, is the basis of Twitter. Over 500 million tweets go out every day to individuals who enjoy the simplicity, functional design, and speed of delivery that twitter offers, along with the ability to connect with others, collaborate and share ideas.  To say that Twitter is viral is to understate the facts.


Twitter launched in March, 2006,has become the go to place . By the fall of 2013, there were over a billion registered twitter users who generate more than 500 million tweets daily. Since its inception there have been over 50,000,000 healthcare tweets; over 5,000 comments, and there are more than 1,000 common healthcare hastags.These tweets come from individuals, hospitals, physicians and other providers, health advocates, patients and caretakers.  They offer advice and resources on every imaginable health topic from information about procedures and surgeries, to public policy and population management, to patient commentaries.


The ability to retweet someone else’s tweet and to send messages to people based on tweets merely expands the reach. Currently SPM has over 3,000 followers on twitter and the Journal of Participatory Medicine has nearly 2,000 followers. We also conduct tweet chats.


Read more: http://networkedblogs.com/TL4UM

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Doctor Saves Patient's Life Using Technique He Learned While Watching TV show

Doctor Saves Patient's Life Using Technique He Learned While Watching TV show | Patient Information | Scoop.it

In an extraordinary example of life imitating art, a 55-year-old German man was successfully cured of cobalt intoxication when a doctor recalled a similar case he had seen on the popular medical TV show, House


When the patient was first admitted to a clinic in Marburg, Germany, in 2012 with severe heart failure, medical examinations ruled out the most likely cause, coronary artery disease. The man returned several times over the course of the year, presenting a range of symptoms including fever, enlarged lymph nodes, increasing deafness and loss of sight — yet doctors were still unable to solve the mystery.


Read more: www.policymic.com/articles/81735/how-a-doctor-used-what-he-saw-on-house-to-save-a-patient-s-life

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11 Insights of 2 E-patients

11 Insights of 2 E-patients | Patient Information | Scoop.it

MedCrunch had the pleasure to speak to Kerri Sparling  and Marie Ennis both empowered and vocal epatients and active members of the Doctors 2.0 & You community.


MC: Please give us three sentences about yourself in the context of health.


Kerri: My name is Kerri Sparling, and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of seven, back in 1986.  Type 1 diabetes is a very serious, intrusive, and chronic illness, but most of the time, people living with it look “fine.”  I advocate for people with diabetes to show that, despite how invisible this disease may seem, it’s not, and it deserves research and funding for a cure.


Marie: I believe in being a co-creator of health. This means respecting the expertise of my doctor while also valuing my own experience and knowledge. I want to partner with my healthcare providers to make decisions about the best treatment that matches my particular circumstances and needs.


Read more: http://www.medcrunch.net/11-insights-life-epatient/

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Doing Patient Engagement For The Wrong Reasons Doesn't Work

Doing Patient Engagement For The Wrong Reasons Doesn't Work | Patient Information | Scoop.it
I recently came across an interview with Stephen Beck, MD, Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO) at Catholic Health Partners. Dr. Beck was being interviewed on the subject of patient portals and...
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6 Myths About Women and Heart Disease

6 Myths About Women and Heart Disease | Patient Information | Scoop.it
Learn about 6 dangerous myths surrounding women and heart disease!
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Patient E-Engagement For Better Health (And Business) Outcomes

Patient E-Engagement For Better Health (And Business) Outcomes | Patient Information | Scoop.it

When I first got my Fitbit, I loved it. It let me track how many steps I took in a day, how many calories I consumed, how well I slept, and more. But over time I got bored with it, and soon I stopped using it altogether. And that experience offers a key lesson for healthcare providers.


There are a growing number of wellness devices on the market, from personal fitness trackers like Fitbit, Nike+ Fuelband, andJawbone UP to wellness tools such asHealthyCloud and PinkPad. Many of these devices leverage innovative technology. And they provide an opportunity for providers such as hospitals and physician groups to engage patients and help ensure better health outcomes.


But for patient e-engagement to deliver on its promise, wellness devices will have to do more than let users record how many glasses of water they drink. Instead, healthcare providers will need to find ways to use health-management tools to truly engage patients in optimizing their own care. And they’ll need to integrate those tools with their core systems and data to ensure optimal health outcomes—and to better attract and retain customers.


Read more: http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/industries/healthcare-providers-patient-e-engagement-for-better-health-and-business-outcomes-01243663#.UvRCWDwdgkc.twitter

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Personalized Cancer Medicine - When Will the Time be 'Now'?

Personalized Cancer Medicine - When Will the Time be 'Now'? | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Cancer is not just one disease. It is a myriad collection of diseases that can affect virtually any cell type or tissue in the human body. Even the major types of cancer that occur most commonly (like breast cancer, lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) do not represent one kind of cancer. Some major forms of cancer manifest as different morphologic variants (perhaps reflecting the specific cell type that gave rise to the cancer), different morphologic subtypes can exhibit differences in genetics and gene expression patterns, and most importantly, even in cases where cancers share morphology, there can be dramatic differences in the underlying molecular signature (genetics and gene expression patterns). The molecular signatures of cancer include gene expression patterns and other genetic factors that influence gene expression and the function of gene products and pathways. Hence, the presence of specific gene mutations, the nature of chromosomal abnormalities, gene copy number variation, aberrations of post-transcriptional regulation and other epigenetic mechanisms combine to influence the overall molecular signature. This complex genetics and gene expression signatures observed among cancers are important because they drive the phenotype of the cancer (including growth rate, invasiveness, and ability for metastatic spread) and in many cases influence the response of a given cancer to various therapeutic agents and approaches.


Read more: http://scitechconnect.elsevier.com/personalized-cancer-medicine-will-time-now/

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Patient engagement: just ask for their story

Patient engagement: just ask for their story | Patient Information | Scoop.it

At the end of the day everyone wants to matter to somebody. Patients want to be recognised for who they are and to count in the scheme of things. To provide them with truly compassionate and personalised healthcare, however, you need to know their stories—not just the medical conditions they have, but their background, thoughts, feelings and values. Writing as a patient rather than a marketer, in this article Ash Rishi looks at ways to get patients' stories which ultimately can improve healthcare services.


Ways to get the story

So, how do you get your patients to tell you their stories? One way is to ask. Physician Dr Emily Gibson started an initiative in her practice to create an "About Me" folder for each of her patients. When the patient logs in to the online portal for the first time, they have the opportunity to respond to questions covering family, background, career, sexual orientation, spirituality and opinion, in addition to their health issues. This helps her get to know her patients and provides her with a profile that goes above and beyond the symptoms they suffer from.


Benefits of storytelling

Doctors are increasingly finding that the secret to treating their patients lies not in the illness or symptoms, but in their fears, habits, beliefs and even financial issues. Knowing those details and encouraging patient openness through storytelling can make a significant difference to the way conditions are treated, and enable you to offer the added benefit of empathy.


Read more: http://www.pharmaphorum.com/articles/patient-engagement-just-ask-for-their-story

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Personal Health Records should empower wellness, connect doctors and patients

Personal Health Records should empower wellness, connect doctors and patients | Patient Information | Scoop.it

For many of us, it’s easy to feel like a passive participant in our health. When we go to the doctor, we often have no idea why we were prescribed a certain medication. We’re unsure what we were just diagnosed with, and often never see the lab results our doctor ordered.


There is also broad consensus that something is broken in American healthcare. 34% of adults are obese, 1 in 3 adults have hypertension, and 25 million Americans are diabetic. Healthcare costs consume over 17% of GDP.


When we talk about healthcare reform, we talk about fixing hospitals, pricing and insurance companies. But the ultimate goal is always patient health. Healthier patients means less illness. Less illness means decreased costs. More importantly, healthier patients means healthier people.


73% of U.S. adults have researched health information online and 86% of patients that say they want to take a more proactive role in managing their care. But many of us don’t have the clarity and resources we need to do this. We try to keep up with our doctors’ advice, our past medical history, our medications, insurance bills, fitness devices, and more – but there isn’t a central place to keep track of all your health information and get your questions answered as they arise.


Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/personal-health-records-empower-wellness-connect-doctors-patients/

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Why I tweet: A patient advocate view

Why I tweet: A patient advocate view | Patient Information | Scoop.it

Twitter — its functions, benefits, risks and limitations — has figured prominently in the heated discussion about Emma and Bill Keller’s respective editorials in The Guardian (since deleted, though the archived version is still available) and the New York Times about the Twitter feed of Lisa Bonchek Adams. I have followed Lisa for a long time and greatly admire her thoughtful, highly personal tweets about the ups and downs of what it takes for her to face the challenges of metastatic breast cancer. Her generosity of spirit is a gift to many of us.


In comparison, I am a different type of tweeter, posting a weekday stream of tweets aimed at addressing generally the subject that Lisa talks about so personally: finding and making the best possible use of health care. This is a description of what I tweet — and why.


Since 1992, I have advocated for all of us to have the information, support and guidance we need to act to improve our health and get the most from our health care. I believe — and there is evidence to back me up — that we do better when we participate in our care to the extent we are able with as much knowledge about what might work that we can absorb.


Read more: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/02/tweet-patient-advocate-view.html

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