Patient Centered Healthcare
6.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Patient Centered Healthcare
Articles and discussions on patient centered healthcare, patient education, patient awareness, patient engagement... Relevant to Hospitals, Physicians, Healthcare Organizations, Pharma, Insurance
Curated by Parag Vora
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Everything You Need to Know About Colonoscopies

Infographic: Everything You Need to Know About Colonoscopies | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
Colorectal cancer - cancer of the colon or rectum – is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, removing precancerous growths found during a colonoscopy can cut the risk of dying from colon cancer in half. Less than half of ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Genetic techniques have role in future of dental care

Genetic techniques have role in future of dental care | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
A visit to the dentist could one day require a detailed look at how genes in a patient's body are being switched on or off, as well as examining their pearly whites, according to researchers at the University of Adelaide.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Five Ways Patient Engagement Can Start in the Office

Five Ways Patient Engagement Can Start in the Office | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

1. Have patients start to monitor their health metrics with pen and paper.

One example in which I as a cardiologist engage patients initially is to have them start to manually keep track of their blood pressures (if a diagnosis of hypertension is suspected but not made, if medications are changed which might affect BP, or to attempt to correlate symptoms with BP). I observe a compliance rate of 100% with a request for a two-week log.  At follow-up (either via the patient portal or in person) I review the record (I supply the patient with a pre-printed chart to fill out), reaffirm the importance of the data, and then perhaps move to discussions about monitoring via simple apps that they or their caregiver might use (even if unrelated to blood pressure).


2. Introduce mobile health apps for wellness first. 

When discussing diet, medication adherence (especially when prescribing a new one), disease state education, or perhaps smoking cessation, I make it know that there are apps to assist in those areas. I give a list of the best ones and suggest that their caregiver if needed help with the download or use of the app. I show sample snapshots from the app store on my own phone.  I believe that wellness apps are easier to introduce as engagement tools than specific disease apps (at least to the less digitally literate).


3. Discuss your philosophy as a physician. 

After I introduce myself to a new patient (with the same degree of attention to the caregiver in the exam room), I discuss my practice philosophy of only recommending the minimal degree of testing and prescriptions (many patients mistrust physicians as prescribing testing or drugs because of financial incentives).  I then go on to stress shared decision making which requires a partnership of honesty and listening. I believe this to be imperative as it not only sets the tone in a positive manner but establishes the importance of patient participation.


4. Learn about the patient as a person. 

Knowing the caregiver support (or lack thereof) around a patient gives a physician the milieu in which shared decision-making is to play out. Critical barriers might exist which will ever prevent success without adjustments by the provider and/or the patient. Caregivers should be involved whether it is a near or distant interested relative, friend, acquaintance or other professional involved with the patient. A patient’s former or present occupation or hobby might impact treatment plans or give insight into educational and levels, and degree of independence.


5. Create buy-in from physician colleagues.

Discussing patient engagement within the context of everyday professional interaction is a great way to change culture one person at a time. In correspondences or conversations regarding a patient, “The patient, family and I have decided”, “I found the BP diary the patient filled out for me very useful” or “I recommended that the patient consider using such and such diabetes app” are non-threatening or proselytizing ways to convey how I view positively and embrace engagement.


Read more: http://davidleescher.com/2014/03/03/five-ways-patient-engagement-can-start-in-the-office/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Predicting the Future of ePatients

Predicting the Future of ePatients | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
Nearly half of ePatients living in the United States say the web has helped them get treatment faster, better communicate with their doctors, understand medications, or otherwise “CareHack” the health system over the past three years, according to new data published in EPATIENT 2015: 15 Surprising Trends Changing Health Care.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools

In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Without a doubt patient engagement is one of the more important trends in healthcare and health IT right now. Over the past few years the tools that look to enable patient engagement between providers and patients have changed markedly. It is important to note, however, that the tools themselves are just a small part of the story — they can go a long way toward improving patient engagement, though. The drivers of the patient engagement buzz are varied, but one big one is the federal government’s Office of the National Coordinator’s (ONC) Meaningful Use (MU) program, which is beginning to include requirements for very basic patient engagement services. 


ONC’s MU Stage II requirements include at least three patient engagement related deliverables of providers. To meet Stage II, providers must give patients clinical summaries after each visit. They must use electronic secure messaging to communicate with patients on relevant health information with a minimum of 5 percent of their patients during the review period. They must also provide patients with the ability to view online, download and transmit information about a hospital admission and give them access to any health information about that patient the providers receives — within four days of receiving it.


Read more: http://mobihealthnews.com/29985/in-depth-a-brief-history-of-digital-patient-engagement-tools/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Parag Vora from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Can a patient share too much health information online?

On February 11th the #hcldr (healthcare leaders) community got together on our weekly tweetchat to talk about healthcare privacy. The first question generated a lot of interesting ideas and comments.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

How Does Patient Engagement Help in Quality Care?

How Does Patient Engagement Help in Quality Care? | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Globally, industries spend millions trying to listen to the ‘voice of the customer’, and understand their needs. They then spend millions more in analyzing the information they have collected, understanding what the customer needs and then tailoring a product or service that will perfectly mirror that need.


An exception is the healthcare industry, where the primary mover is not the consumer, but the provider. This is despite major studies and research establishing that patient engagement is the key to better and more effective healthcare.


Read more: http://suyati.com/how-patient-engagement-helps-quality-care/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Twitter Empowers Patients to Seek and to Speak Out

Twitter Empowers Patients to Seek and to Speak Out | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

The ability to write something meaningful in140 characters, including a shortened URL, is the basis of Twitter. Over 500 million tweets go out every day to individuals who enjoy the simplicity, functional design, and speed of delivery that twitter offers, along with the ability to connect with others, collaborate and share ideas.  To say that Twitter is viral is to understate the facts.


Twitter launched in March, 2006,has become the go to place . By the fall of 2013, there were over a billion registered twitter users who generate more than 500 million tweets daily. Since its inception there have been over 50,000,000 healthcare tweets; over 5,000 comments, and there are more than 1,000 common healthcare hastags.These tweets come from individuals, hospitals, physicians and other providers, health advocates, patients and caretakers.  They offer advice and resources on every imaginable health topic from information about procedures and surgeries, to public policy and population management, to patient commentaries.


The ability to retweet someone else’s tweet and to send messages to people based on tweets merely expands the reach. Currently SPM has over 3,000 followers on twitter and the Journal of Participatory Medicine has nearly 2,000 followers. We also conduct tweet chats.


Read more: http://networkedblogs.com/TL4UM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Doctor Saves Patient's Life Using Technique He Learned While Watching TV show

Doctor Saves Patient's Life Using Technique He Learned While Watching TV show | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

In an extraordinary example of life imitating art, a 55-year-old German man was successfully cured of cobalt intoxication when a doctor recalled a similar case he had seen on the popular medical TV show, House


When the patient was first admitted to a clinic in Marburg, Germany, in 2012 with severe heart failure, medical examinations ruled out the most likely cause, coronary artery disease. The man returned several times over the course of the year, presenting a range of symptoms including fever, enlarged lymph nodes, increasing deafness and loss of sight — yet doctors were still unable to solve the mystery.


Read more: www.policymic.com/articles/81735/how-a-doctor-used-what-he-saw-on-house-to-save-a-patient-s-life

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

11 Insights of 2 E-patients

11 Insights of 2 E-patients | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

MedCrunch had the pleasure to speak to Kerri Sparling  and Marie Ennis both empowered and vocal epatients and active members of the Doctors 2.0 & You community.


MC: Please give us three sentences about yourself in the context of health.


Kerri: My name is Kerri Sparling, and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of seven, back in 1986.  Type 1 diabetes is a very serious, intrusive, and chronic illness, but most of the time, people living with it look “fine.”  I advocate for people with diabetes to show that, despite how invisible this disease may seem, it’s not, and it deserves research and funding for a cure.


Marie: I believe in being a co-creator of health. This means respecting the expertise of my doctor while also valuing my own experience and knowledge. I want to partner with my healthcare providers to make decisions about the best treatment that matches my particular circumstances and needs.


Read more: http://www.medcrunch.net/11-insights-life-epatient/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Doing Patient Engagement For The Wrong Reasons Doesn't Work

Doing Patient Engagement For The Wrong Reasons Doesn't Work | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
I recently came across an interview with Stephen Beck, MD, Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO) at Catholic Health Partners. Dr. Beck was being interviewed on the subject of patient portals and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Patient E-Engagement For Better Health (And Business) Outcomes

Patient E-Engagement For Better Health (And Business) Outcomes | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

When I first got my Fitbit, I loved it. It let me track how many steps I took in a day, how many calories I consumed, how well I slept, and more. But over time I got bored with it, and soon I stopped using it altogether. And that experience offers a key lesson for healthcare providers.


There are a growing number of wellness devices on the market, from personal fitness trackers like Fitbit, Nike+ Fuelband, andJawbone UP to wellness tools such asHealthyCloud and PinkPad. Many of these devices leverage innovative technology. And they provide an opportunity for providers such as hospitals and physician groups to engage patients and help ensure better health outcomes.


But for patient e-engagement to deliver on its promise, wellness devices will have to do more than let users record how many glasses of water they drink. Instead, healthcare providers will need to find ways to use health-management tools to truly engage patients in optimizing their own care. And they’ll need to integrate those tools with their core systems and data to ensure optimal health outcomes—and to better attract and retain customers.


Read more: http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/industries/healthcare-providers-patient-e-engagement-for-better-health-and-business-outcomes-01243663#.UvRCWDwdgkc.twitter

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Parag Vora from PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Communities: The Power of Patient Engagement

Healthcare Communities: The Power of Patient Engagement | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
Consider the experience of Rob Long, a veteran writer and sitcom producer, as described in his weekly radio commentary on KRCW a few years ago: Two weeks ago, I found myself in the office of a hematologist — which is a word they use because the other word is “oncologist”...

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Parag Vora from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
Scoop.it!

People Coping With Rare Disease Are Internet Power Users

People Coping With Rare Disease Are Internet Power Users | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
Beyond information, many people in the midst of a medical crisis search for and find emotional support online. A survey shows people with rare disease are some of the most sophisticated Internet surfers

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

How to Educate and Empower Patients: Thoughts From an Expert

How to Educate and Empower Patients: Thoughts From an Expert | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
There are specific patient education departments in most major medical centers. What role do they play and how have they evolved over the years? I spoke with Louise Villejo, Executive Director at the Patient Education Office at the MD Anderson Cancer Center to get her thoughts on the topic.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Including patients in digital health design: Two startups share how they've done it

Including patients in digital health design: Two startups share how they've done it | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

During a Stanford MedX Live panel on healthcare entrepreneurship Tuesday night, someone on Twitter posed an important question: How can we better incorporate the patient’s voice into the development of healthcare IT?


Adrian James is co-founder of Omada Health, a venture-backed digital health company that designed a 16-week diabetes prevention program to help at-risk people develop healthier habits through social support, data tracking, personalized coaching and structured learning. It’s based on the Diabetes Prevention Program, which was tested in a 3,200-subject study and demonstrated that people with pre-diabetes could cut their risk of disease progression by losing weight through exercise and diet changes.


The former designer at IDEO explained that one of the first steps in creating Omada Health was getting user feedback, even before there was a product.


“We literally went out with a single printed piece of paper – it was this concept that we might be able to match people with pre-diabetes into small groups and usher them, in a virtual setting, through this clinical trial,” he said.


Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/bringing-patients-design-process-heres-two-digital-health-startups/

more...
PatientView's curator insight, February 26, 2014 12:11 PM

Not only there should be patients supplying user feedback but they should also be incorporated in helping in design and decision making itself - patient co-creation is the wave of the future in healthcare 

Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Are physicians ready for the e-patient movement?

Are physicians ready for the e-patient movement? | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

I gave a talk recently to a group of my peers about addressing the needs of patients after a diagnosis of cancer, emphasizing points where transitions occur — from treatment, to end of therapy, surveillance, recurrence, and extending all the way up to the end of life — and how important it is to consider the entire journey of a person with cancer, from patient to survivor.


One of my goals of this talk was to address the need for oncologists to engage those actually diagnosed with cancer, the most interested of the “stakeholders.” I asked my colleagues if they had heard of a movement afoot in medicine, that of patient engagement, and whether they knew of folks like David deBronkart (alias e-Patient Dave). I was met with a few nods, but mostly none had heard of either. In truth, I was surprised to see that the patient engagement movement had not achieved greater familiarity with my audience.


Read more: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/02/physicians-ready-epatient-movement.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

4 Tech Trends That Will Increase Patient Engagement in 2014

4 Tech Trends That Will Increase Patient Engagement in 2014 | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Improvements in healthcare information technology in the last decade have led to a fundamental shift in the way healthcare providers operate. The use of electronic health records is now widespread and healthcare professionals have access to immense amounts of data. While technology has improved clinical performance in many ways, patient engagement has certainly suffered a setback.


Today’s healthcare professionals are tied to technology. Whether documenting care at a computer terminal or looking up patient history on a tablet, clinicians are left with less time to engage directly with patients. In fact, data entry can take up to one-third of a clinician’s day.


Clinicians want to spend more time interacting with patients versus engaging with technology, and patients deserve it. By increasing the time spent working with and educating patients, clinicians can improve patient satisfaction, increase Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS®) survey scores, and provide a better overall patient experience.


Read more: http://hin.com/blog/2014/02/13/guest-post-4-tech-trends-that-will-increase-patient-engagement-in-2014/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Infographic: 7 Reasons to Engage Patients Before Their Appointments

Infographic: 7 Reasons to Engage Patients Before Their Appointments | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it
This infographic provides 7 ways to boost patient engagement prior to their appointments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Video: A Patient's View of Using Social Media #hcsm

Kelly English is a consumer/patient living in British Columbia, Canada, with rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes. She is a social media enthusiast who h...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Tips for Finding Reliable Health Information Online

Tips for Finding Reliable Health Information Online | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Finding accurate, reliable, and current health information online can be difficult and overwhelming. The Internet has a wealth of health information—some information is true and accurate, and some is not.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when visiting a website:

  • Websites should have a way to contact the organization or webmaster. If the site provides no contact information or it is not clear who runs the site, use caution.
  • Beware of claims that offer one cure for a variety of illnesses, like a breakthrough or secret ingredient.
  • Look for latest findings from research, not an individual’s opinion.
  • And, always remember to write down questions to bring to doctor visits.


Read more: http://homedialyzorsunited.org/tips-for-finding-reliable-health-information-online/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Google Glass and Patient Engagement – Is This a Match Made in Heaven?

Google Glass and Patient Engagement – Is This a Match Made in Heaven? | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Being a medical professional, Glass Explorer and the co-founder of a healthcare data company, when a new technology is launched I immediately think…  How can we use this to improve healthcare? How can we use the data and the information the technology enables to better connect the healthcare community?


The launch of Google Glass had myself – and many other healthcare professionals - asking just these questions. It’s been exciting to watch the uptake of Glass in the medical space. Despite the privacy concerns people are exploring ways to use the technology to improve healthcare.

InCrowd is active in the patient engagement space; we have been asking our Crowds of healthcare professionals and health consumers to share their feedback on the current state of patient engagement. The findings have been eye opening and I think point to the need for significant change in the way healthcare is provided. Technology will certainly play a role in these changes, as will digital natives who can easily envision a tech enabled future.


Our work in the patient engagement space naturally lead me to wonder how Google Glass could be used as a tool to enhance engagement. As I thought about the feedback shared by the Millennials and Gen Xers, I put together a list of ways I could see Glass enhancing patient engagement.


Read more: http://www.incrowdnow.com/2014/02/google-glass-and-patient-engagement-a-match-made-in-heaven/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

Is Patient Engagement Helping Physicians?

Is Patient Engagement Helping Physicians? | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

Advances in technology have increased manifolds. At the click of a single button, we can access real-time information on Twitter, Facebook and Google. The amount of information present online is huge – from celebrity gossip to patient communication channels. This is how technology is shaping up our world.


Do you ever feel that you just want to isolate yourself from the technology around you? I bet you do. It happens with me all the time. I also believe that information overload leads to an increase in patient anxiety and physician stress by a great deal. Let me explain how.


Our brains are inundated with such a huge amount of information every day that I am not sure they can stay up to speed. I wouldn’t blame them for being unable to, and since we are deriving this information voluntarily, we end up wanting even more. This is the sort of addiction patients are also getting used to – even myself.


Read more: http://blog.curemd.com/is-patient-engagement-helping-physicians/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Parag Vora
Scoop.it!

6 Steps You Can Take to Help Patients With Low Health Literacy

6 Steps You Can Take to Help Patients With Low Health Literacy | Patient Centered Healthcare | Scoop.it

1. Identify 1 or more health literacy champions and/or a health literacy committee.

Consider being the champion within your organization to help lead the efforts and help raise health literacy awareness, or think about someone else who might be great in the role. Depending on resources available and priority of efforts perhaps put together a committee who can focus on assessing, evaluating and improving health literacy within your organization/practice.


2. Evaluate existing patient education materials and patient forms for health literacy principles.

Another important step is doing a basic review of existing materials, including handouts and intake forms. Having health-literate materials on hand will set you up to provide a better patient experience from the get-go.


3. Develop and select patient education using health literacy principles.

The speakers identified several key principles for evaluating whether materials are easy to understand and use. For instance, they said that content should be easy-to-read and focused on problem-solving, with an uncluttered design. Also, visuals should be used for emphasis, and patients depicted should represent the target audience engaged in healthy behaviors.


4. Assess your environment for health literacy and set goals for what can be improved. 

Even just coming into your practice office may create more of a barrier than you may realize. Try to approach your practice with a low-literacy patient in mind. Is the building clearly marked? Are signs clear? If you’re located within a hospital or clinic, can the patient find his or her way back out of building or to the next appointment? Now, most important, what can you do to make improvements?


5. Provide staff training to build health literacy awareness and skills. 

Whether you’re the self-elected health literacy champion or part of a health literacy committee, you can’t go it alone. Incorporate health literacy awareness into your annual training plans if at all possible.


6. Leverage existing tools and resources! 

Meeting the needs of patients with low health literacy levels may seem overwhelming, but there are plenty of great resources out there. To get started, check out our Health Literacy Tools article, where you’ll find links to lots of external resources.


Read more: http://surroundhealth.net/Topics/Education-and-Learning-approaches/Health-literacy/Articles/6-Steps-You-Can-Take-to-Help-Patients-With-Low-Hea.aspx

more...
No comment yet.