parkerjones.biz-We Buy Houses Everett
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Parker Jones from Mac Tech Support
Scoop.it!

How to Carry Any Operating System in Your Pocket | TechHive

How to Carry Any Operating System in Your Pocket | TechHive | parkerjones.biz-We Buy Houses Everett | Scoop.it
You never know when you might need to install your favorite operating system--and it takes only a few minutes to load it on a USB flash drive so that you can carry it with you wherever you go. Here’s how to do it.

Via David Anders
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Parker Jones from Teaching + Learning + Policy
Scoop.it!

Mindsets Shape Our Lives

Mindsets Shape Our Lives | parkerjones.biz-We Buy Houses Everett | Scoop.it

"Carol Dweck found in her research that one of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality. A 'fixed mindset' assumes that our character, intelligence, and creative ability are static givens which we can’t change in any meaningful way, and success is the affirmation of that inherent intelligence, an assessment of how those givens measure up against an equally fixed standard; striving for success and avoiding failure at all costs become a way of maintaining the sense of being smart or skilled. A 'growth mindset', on the other hand, thrives on challenge and sees failure not as evidence of unintelligence but as a heartening springboard for growth and for stretching our existing abilities. Out of these two mindsets, which we manifest from a very early age, springs a great deal of our behavior, our relationship with success and failure in both professional and personal contexts, and ultimately our capacity for happiness. The consequences of believing that intelligence and personality can be developed rather than being immutably engrained traits, Dweck found in her two decades of research with both children and adults, are significant." | by Maria Popova

 


Via Todd Reimer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Parker Jones from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

5 Ways To Keep Your Cool In Heated Times

5 Ways To Keep Your Cool In Heated Times | parkerjones.biz-We Buy Houses Everett | Scoop.it

While we think of stress in negative terms, not all stress is bad for us. Recent research by former UC Berkeley post-doctoral fellow Elizabeth Kirby has shown that short-term periods of acute stress are actually good for us. In the study, Kirby found that short-term episodes of stress in rats caused their brains to develop new nerve cells which improved their mental performance. She concludes that short periods of stress keep our brains more alert and helps us adapt to new situations.

 

On the other hand, chronic stress has been shown to be bad for us. Research has shown that long-term ongoing stress suppresses the production of new neurons in the hippocampus, or memory area of the brain, thereby decreasing our memory. It has also been shown to have damaging effects on our entire bodies resulting in increased risk for chronic obesity, heart disease, and depression.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 20, 2014 7:25 PM

Chronic stress can kill. Here's how to stay calm, even when you're ready to snap.

Rescooped by Parker Jones from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

What Does Professionalism Look Like?

What Does Professionalism Look Like? | parkerjones.biz-We Buy Houses Everett | Scoop.it

For Emily Heaphy, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Boston University, and her colleagues, this isn’t a cop-out. The notion of being seen as professional may be central to how we define success in the U.S. — and, consequently, how and why certain people aren’t able to attain it, depending on how well they adhere to social norms. In particular, Heaphy and the other researchers set out to study “one potential culturally bounded workplace norm — that of minimizing references to one’s life outside of work.”

 

They did this in two ways: First, they tested how people connect perceptions of professionalism to what a worker’s desk looked like. Second, they examined how recruiters from two different countries rated potential employees who referenced family or children.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 20, 2014 7:28 PM

When we talk about “professionalism,” it’s easy to fall back into the “I know it when I see it” argument.