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Scooped by Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home
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World Cancer Report 2014: No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe

World Cancer Report 2014: No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe | Parents in Recovery | Scoop.it

"A causal relationship exists between alcohol consumption and cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, colon-rectum, liver, and female breast; a significant relationship also exists between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer...the relationship with... tumors, such as breast cancer, has come to our attention only in the past 10-15 years."

Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's insight:


The 2014 World Cancer Report (WCR), issued by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) debunks the idea that people can feel safe from harm if they engage in "responsible drinking". This report on Medscape explains that according to the report, "when it comes to cancer, no amount of alcohol is safe". 


The Medscape article goes on to explain that "alcoholic beverages can contain at least 15 carcinogenic compounds, including acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, and lead. Ethanol is the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages."
 

The type of alcohol ingested doesn't alter cancer risk, except in the case of the esophagus.  The fine hairs that cover the esophagus are "easily destroyed by high concentrations of ethanol, such as found in hard liquor."


Most of us would like to believe that light drinking doesn't pose a cancer risk.  But according to the report, it does.  "A  meta-analysis of 222 studies comprising 92,000 light drinkers and 60,000 nondrinkers with cancer revealed that  light drinking was associated with risk for oropharyngeal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and female breast cancer. From this meta-analysis, it was estimated that in 2004 worldwide, 5000 deaths from oropharyngeal cancer, 24,000 from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 5000 from breast cancer were attributable to light drinking."


Jürgen Rehm, PhD, WCR contributor on alcohol consumption, and Senior Scientist at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario, Canada,  observed  that a warning label mentioning cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption should be considered for all alcohol products. He also suggested that limiting the affordability of alcohol through pricing and taxation is a strategy that can reduce the volume of alcohol consumed, and thereby  reduce alcohol-related health and social damage, including cancer and mortality.



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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:22 AM


The 2014 World Cancer Report (WCR), issued by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) debunks the idea that people can feel safe from harm if they engage in "responsible drinking". This report on Medscape explains that according to the report,"when it comes to cancer, no amount of alcohol is safe". 


The Medscape article goes on to explain that "alcoholic beverages can contain at least 15 carcinogenic compounds, including acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, and lead. Ethanol is the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages."
 

The type of alcohol ingested doesn't alter cancer risk, except in the case of the esophagus.  The fine hairs that cover the esophagus are "easily destroyed by high concentrations of ethanol, such as found in hard liquor."


Most of us would like to believe that light drinking doesn't pose a cancer risk.  But according to the report, it does.  "A  meta-analysis of 222 studies comprising 92,000 light drinkers and 60,000 nondrinkers with cancer revealed that  light drinking was associated with risk for oropharyngeal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and female breast cancer. From this meta-analysis, it was estimated that in 2004 worldwide, 5000 deaths from oropharyngeal cancer, 24,000 from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 5000 from breast cancer were attributable to light drinking."


Jürgen Rehm, PhD, WCR contributor on alcohol consumption, and Senior Scientist at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario, Canada,  observed  that a warning label mentioning cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption should be considered for all alcohol products. He also suggested that limiting the affordability of alcohol through pricing and taxation is a strategy that can reduce the volume of alcohol consumed, and thereby  reduce alcohol-related health and social damage, including cancer and mortality.

Rescooped by Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home from Addictions and Mental Health
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Dependent on Prescription Drugs, Even Before Birth

Dependent on Prescription Drugs, Even Before Birth | Parents in Recovery | Scoop.it
Growing numbers of newborns across the country are struggling with addiction as prescription drug abuse ravages communities.
Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's insight:


This article highlights the dilemma for doctors who treat expectant mothers who are addicted to prescription painkillers.  Quitting cold turkey can lead to miscarriage and seizures in utero for babies.  On the other hand, babies born to mothers who are treated with methadone must be "painstakingly withdrawn" from the drug after birth, and little is known about the long-term impact of methadone on a child's development.  Uncertainties about how best to proceed in these cases is causing many doctors to refuse to treat women addicted to opiates.


The article explains that "a study published in...The New England Journal of Medicine showed that babies whose mothers had taken buprenorphine required significantly less medication after birth and less time in the hospital than did babies whose mothers were treated with methadone."  But it also notes that  exposure to buprenorphine in utero can still cause withdrawal symptoms and that this drug does not seem to work for all addicts.

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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, February 6, 2014 9:01 AM


This article highlights the dilemma for doctors who treat expectant mothers who are addicted to prescription painkillers.  Quitting cold turkey can lead to miscarriage and seizures in utero for babies.  On the other hand, babies born to mothers who are treated with methadone must be "painstakingly withdrawn" from the drug after birth, and little is known about the long-term impact of methadone on a child's development.  Uncertainties about how best to proceed in these cases is causing many doctors to refuse to treat women addicted to opiates.


The article explains that "a study published in...The New England Journal of Medicine showed that babies whose mothers had taken buprenorphine required significantly less medication after birth and less time in the hospital than did babies whose mothers were treated with methadone."  But it also notes that  exposure to buprenorphine in utero can still cause withdrawal symptoms and that this drug does not seem to work for all addicts.


Rescooped by Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home from Addictions and Mental Health
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Teen drug abuse: 14 mistakes parents make

Teen drug abuse: 14 mistakes parents make | Parents in Recovery | Scoop.it
Mom and dad can do a lot to help their kids steer clear of drugs and alcohol
Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's insight:


Addiction specialist Dr. Joseph Lee, a spokesman for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and medical director of the Hazelden Center for Youth and Family provided CBS News with 14 ideas about ways in which parents can act to either prevent adolescent substance abuse or effectively address it an early, more treatable stage.  Several of his observations concern the need to have direct and open conversations with teens about expectations, substance use, mental health issues and family history.  All of his points are apt and significant and this is a useful slideshow to share with parents.  It  could be a way to help them begin to think about whether they have had substantive conversations with their kids about these matters, and if they haven't, to identify the  fears that may be blocking them.

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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:17 AM


Addiction specialist Dr. Joseph Lee, a spokesman for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and medical director of the Hazelden Center for Youth and Family provided CBS News with 14 ideas about ways in which parents can act to either prevent adolescent substance abuse or effectively address it an early, more treatable stage.  Several of his observations concern the need to have direct and open conversations with teens about expectations, substance use, mental health issues and family history.  All of his points are apt and significant and this is a useful slideshow to share with parents.  It  could be a way to help them begin to think about whether they have had substantive conversations with their kids about these matters, and if they haven't, to identify the  fears that may be blocking them.

Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:20 AM


Addiction specialist Dr. Joseph Lee, a spokesman for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and medical director of the Hazelden Center for Youth and Family provided CBS News with 14 ideas about ways in which parents can act to either prevent adolescent substance abuse or effectively address it an early, more treatable stage.  Several of his observations concern the need to have direct and open conversations with teens about expectations, substance use, mental health issues and family history.  All of his points are apt and significant and this is a useful slideshow to share with parents.  It  could be a way to help them begin to think about whether they have had substantive conversations with their kids about these matters, and if they haven't, to identify the  fears that may be blocking them.

Rescooped by Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home from Addictions and Mental Health
Scoop.it!

The Most Important Thing for Parents in Recovery to Know

The Most Important Thing for Parents in Recovery to Know | Parents in Recovery | Scoop.it

A child’s chances of remaining or becoming healthy when a family plunges into crisis, depends to a great extent, on the ability of at least one parent (or other significant adult caretaker) to remain emotionally sober–that is, stable, supportive and capable of holding the child’s most basic needs in mind.

Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's insight:

 

This post explains how one emotionally sober parent can preserve the psychological health of a child in a family that is struggling with alcoholism and other substance use disorders.  

Photo by D. Sharon Pruitt.

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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, January 4, 2014 6:56 PM

 

This post explains how one emotionally sober parent can preserve the psychological health of a child in a family that is struggling with alcoholism and other substance use disorders.  

Photo by D. Sharon Pruitt.

Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, January 4, 2014 7:00 PM

 

This post explains how one emotionally sober parent can preserve the psychological health of a child in a family that is struggling with alcoholism and other substance use disorders.  

Photo by D. Sharon Pruitt.