Paramedic OHS
27 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Rope Characteristics

Bevis Rope produces fine quality twisted and braided ropes. We produce twisted ropes in Polypropylene, Nylon, Poly/Dac, and Polyester. We produce ropes from 1/4" diameter to 2" diameter.
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

This well-designed rope characteristic chart clearly explains the varying characteristics of different types and thicknesses of rope. Ropes are arguably the most important piece of equipment in rockclimbing. 

 

This website would help Nathan get a better understanding of ropes and help him to choose the right rope for different circumstances.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Placing Traditional Protection

Placing Traditional Protection | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
How to place your own protection during a rock climb, including active protection, passive protection, and using natural protection.
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

This website directly addresses gear placement in Traditional Climbing. Trad climbing is the most dangerous climbing style and correct gear placement is paramount to a safe journey.

 

This website would directly increase the safety of any of Nathans Traditional Climbing outtings.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Climbing Knots | How to Tie Climbing Knots | Animated Climbing Knots

Climbing Knots | How to Tie Climbing Knots | Animated Climbing Knots | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Animated Knots by Grog - index of climbing knots
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

A veritable bible on climbing knots, this website provides everything a climber needs to know about tying knots, when to use them, and dynamic and breaking strengths.

 

This website would help Nathan to understand knots, the lifeblood of climbing. Understand knots and their uses would greatly lessen risks and hazards encountered by Nathan while rockclimbing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

OHS involved with Road-cycling

OHS involved with Road-cycling | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Dwight, 28, is a semi-professional Triathlon Racer. During training for the cycling leg of his event, he spends countless hours riding on roads. The greatest hazard in this part of his training is the motor-vehicles with whom he shares the road. A few simple measures however have kept minimised the risks faced by Dwight during training.

 

A good impact-absorbing helmet minimises the risks of serious brain injury if an accident with a road vehicle ever occured.

 

Monthly bicycle servicing ensures key components such as breaks and tyres are in working condition.

 

Bright, flashing LED lights make the bike extra visible to motorists, ensuring that they take care when driving close to the rider.

 

The use of Bicycle lanes and other side lanes wherever possible increases the distance between the rider and the motor-vehicles, minimising risk of collision.

 

Whenever riding in a group, always riding in single-file, so that a minimal amount of road-space is taken up by the cyclers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

OHS involved with truck driving

OHS involved with truck driving | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Kent, 48, is a truck driver and has been for the last 30 years. The largest hazard that truck-drivers face is Fatigue. It accounts for the majority of all work-place injuries and deaths. Truck-drivers have developed many methods to minimise the risk of fatigue related injury, some legal and some less than legal.

 

Talking, whether to other truck-drivers via Radio or friends and family via phone, engages the mind and helps the truck-driver to stay awake and alert.

 

Caffeinated drinks, pharmacologically help the body to stay awake, and often consumed in high quantities by truck-drivers.

 

Regular stops are utilised by some truck-drivers, however these can have a negative effect on the efficiency of the delivery and are therefore used sparingly.

 

Speeding is often utilised in areas with minimal traffic and police presence. Not only does it reduce the amount of time the truck-driver is behind the wheel, therefore minimising fatigue potential, it also speeds up the efficiency of the delivery.

 

Psychostimulant drugs, are utilised by an increasing amount of truck-drivers. These include, Speed, Ecstasy and Methamphetamines. These allow the truck-driver to stay awake for increased amount of time, however they are illegal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Paramedic safety in the spotlight

Paramedic safety in the spotlight | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
IN HIS 14 years as a paramedic, Matthew Eastham has seen several of his colleagues physical and verbally assaulted.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Zero tolerance for assaults on paramedics - Ambulance Service of NSW

Zero tolerance for assaults on paramedics - Ambulance Service of NSW | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Ambulance Service of NSW
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Interesting report by NSW Ambulance Service including interview with paramedic Brian Purcell on the rise in assaults on paramedics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Health and Safety information - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Health and Safety information - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Interesting facts about injuries incurred by paramedics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

How to Avoid Loose Rock — Stay Safe Climbing by Avoiding Loose Rock

How to Avoid Loose Rock — Stay Safe Climbing by Avoiding Loose Rock | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Loose rock is encountered on almost every route that you climb. Follow these 15 safe climbing tips to avoid loose rocks and climbing accidents caused by rockfall.
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Loose rock is one of the biggest causes of injury in the rockclimbing world. This article deals with how to recognise and avoid this hazard.

 

Nathan would gain a better understanding of loose rock and the methods of recognising and avoiding it. This would greatly improve his occupational health and safety in rockclimbing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Rock Climbing Tech Tips: Equalising Anchors

Rock Climbing Tech Tips: Equalising Anchors | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

This website clearly describes the process of equalising anchors in ROckclimbing. This process halves the force put on the anchors during a fall, which greatly reduces the chance of any gear failing. This would greatly improve the safety of Nathans climbing experiences.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

OHS involved with Cave Diving

OHS involved with Cave Diving | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Alex, 32, is a certified Cave-Diver and Dive Instructor. Cave-Diving is potentially one of the most-dangerous forms of diving, due to the limited room for error that diving in an enclosed space with limited egress options involved..

 

There must always be a straight line out of the cave. This is usually through use of a roll of special string attached to the entrance of the cave. This means that the Divers should never get lost and in a panicked or low visibility situation they have a definite path out.

 

Doubling of all equipment, including divers. In cave-diving there is no room for malfunctioning or faulty equipment. For this reason all diver carry a spare Oxygen Tank, source of light, compass, oxygen gauge, and Mask. They always operate in a minimum group of two divers.

 

The rule of thirds is applied to any Cave Dive. The rule of thirds means that one third of the tank is used for travelling into the cave, and one third of the tank is used for travelling back out of the cave. This leaves one third of the tank for emergencies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

OHS involved with a Ski Resort

OHS involved with a Ski Resort | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

James, 24, works at a Ski Resort in Canadas famous Lake Louise. The major risks the Ski resort faces are due to skiing and snowboarding accidents. These may be due to a number of causes but the resort has put in place measures to minimise these hazards and reduce the risks.

 

Clearly Signed Ski-runs  are featured throughout the slopes. This ensures users stay within the safe areas of the mountain and do not venture into dangerous and unstable regions.

 

A clearly Signed Grading System for the various runs is used so that users are able to gauge the difficulty of various ski-runs with their own level of skill. This prevents users from attempting a ski-run which would be too difficult for them, and potentially dangerous.

 

Ski-patrol personal do regular laps of the runs and are constantly contactable via Radio. These staff are expert skiiers and trained in first aid and patient retrieval.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

OHS involved with rock-climbing

OHS involved with rock-climbing | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Nathan, 25, enjoys Rockclimbing on his days off. Rockclimbing has many hazards and risks, however climbers have developed many guidelines and techniques to minimise risk and reduce hazards. Some of these Hazards are:

Gear Failure: Any malfunction or breakage of the Rope, Quickdraws, Bolts or Belay Device can be dangerous and potentially fatal for any rock-climber. Therefore gear is checked regularly for any possible damage. Rope-core is felt before any climbing session to determine any weaknesses. Belay-devices are checked and double-checked for proper function. And bolts are checked for any damage or looseness.

 

Mis-communication: Mis-communication between climber and belayer is another big risk in rock-climbing. Therefore a very strict and simplified communication method is used. Each person will also acknowledge each communication to ensure each other has understood.

 

Rock-fall: Falling rocks are a big risk in rock-climbing. Therefore climbers will way up the risk of rock-fall due to the type of rock that is being climbed on. If there is no risk no helmets will be used. Medium risk the belayer will wear a helmet. High risk both the belayer and climber will wear a helmet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Emt Health Risks | EMS Michigan

Emt Health Risks | EMS Michigan | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Great article on 3 of the biggest risks faced by paramedics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paramedic Queensland OHS
Scoop.it!

Ambulance staff say assaults of paramedics are on the rise

Ambulance staff say assaults of paramedics are on the rise | Paramedic OHS | Scoop.it
Paramedics say violence towards staff is becoming more common
Paramedic Queensland OHS's insight:

Concerning trends in  assaults on paramedics.

more...
No comment yet.