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Traffic Instabilities in Self-Organized Pedestrian Crowds

Traffic Instabilities in Self-Organized Pedestrian Crowds | Papers | Scoop.it

A crowd of pedestrians is a complex system that exhibits a rich variety of self-organized collective behaviours. For instance, when two flows of people are walking in opposite directions in a crowded street, pedestrians spontaneously share the available space by forming lanes of uniform walking directions. This “pedestrian highway” is a typical example of self-organized functional pattern, as it increases the traffic efficiency with no need of external control. In this work, we have conducted a series of laboratory experiments to determine the behavioral mechanisms underlying this pattern. In contrast to previous theoretical predictions, we found that the traffic organization actually alternates in time between well-organized and disorganized states. Our results demonstrate that this unstable dynamics is due to interactions between people walking faster and slower than the average speed of the crowd. While the traffic efficiency is maximized when everybody walks at the same speed, crowd heterogeneity reduces the collective benefits provided by the traffic segregation. This work is a step ahead in understanding the mechanisms of crowd self-organization, and opens the way for the elaboration of management strategies bound to promote smart collective behaviors.

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Biological physics: Swarming microtubules

Biological physics: Swarming microtubules | Papers | Scoop.it

The spectacle of animals moving en masse is arguably one of the most fascinating phenomena in biology. For example, schools of fish can move in an orderly manner, and then change direction abruptly or, if under pressure from a nearby predator, swirl like a vigorously stirred fluid. The non-living world also has examples of collective motion, in systems that consist of units ranging from macromolecules to metallic rods, or even robots. On page 448 of this issue, Sumino et al. describe another, until now unobserved, example of such behaviour: the coordinated motion of hundreds of thousands of subcellular structures known as microtubules, which spontaneously self-organize into a lattice-like structure of vortices. When considered in the context of about half a dozen known universal classes of collective-motion pattern, this new structure poses challenges in terms of explaining how it can arise and its relevance to applications.

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Self-organizing traffic lights at multiple-street intersections

Self-organizing traffic lights at multiple-street intersections | Papers | Scoop.it

The elementary cellular automaton following rule 184 can mimic particles flowing in one direction at a constant speed. Therefore, this automaton can model highway traffic qualitatively. In a recent paper, we have incorporated intersections regulated by traffic lights to this model using exclusively elementary cellular automata. In such a paper, however, we only explored a rectangular grid. We now extend our model to more complex scenarios using an hexagonal grid. This extension shows first that our model can readily incorporate multiple-way intersections and hence simulate complex scenarios. In addition, the current extension allows us to study and evaluate the behavior of two different kinds of traffic-light controller for a grid of six-way streets allowing for either two- or three-street intersections: a traffic light that tries to adapt to the amount of traffic (which results in self-organizing traffic lights) and a system of synchronized traffic lights with coordinated rigid periods (sometimes called the “green-wave” method). We observe a tradeoff between system capacity and topological complexity. The green-wave method is unable to cope with the complexity of a higher-capacity scenario, while the self-organizing method is scalable, adapting to the complexity of a scenario and exploiting its maximum capacity. Additionally, in this article, we propose a benchmark, independent of methods and models, to measure the performance of a traffic-light controller comparing it against a theoretical optimum.

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