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How to raise a genius: lessons from a 45-year study of super-smart children

How to raise a genius: lessons from a 45-year study of super-smart children | Papers | Scoop.it

A long-running investigation of exceptional children reveals what it takes to produce the scientists who will lead the twenty-first century.

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Convergence of Self-Organizing Pulse-Coupled Oscillator Synchronization in Dynamic Networks

The theory of pulse-coupled oscillators provides a framework to formulate and develop self-organizing synchronization strategies for wireless communications and mobile computing. These strategies show low complexity and are adaptive to changes in the network. Even though several protocols have been proposed and theoretical insight was gained there is no proof that guarantees synchronization of the oscillator phases in general dynamic coupling topologies under technological constraints. Here, we introduce a family of coupling strategies for pulse-coupled oscillators and prove that synchronization emerges for systems with arbitrary connected and dynamic topologies, individually changing signal propagation and processing delays, and stochastic pulse emission. It is shown by simulations how unreliable links or intentionally incomplete communication between oscillators can improve synchronization performance.

 

Convergence of Self-Organizing Pulse-Coupled Oscillator Synchronization in Dynamic Networks

Johannes Klinglmayr ; Christian Bettstetter ; Marc Timme ; Christoph Kirst

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control. Scheduled for August 2017.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TAC.2016.2593642

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Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks

Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks | Papers | Scoop.it

Complex network growth across diverse fields of science is hypothesized to be driven in the main by a combination of preferential attachment and node fitness processes. For measuring the respective influences of these processes, previous approaches make strong and untested assumptions on the functional forms of either the preferential attachment function or fitness function or both. We introduce a Bayesian statistical method called PAFit to estimate preferential attachment and node fitness without imposing such functional constraints that works by maximizing a log-likelihood function with suitably added regularization terms. We use PAFit to investigate the interplay between preferential attachment and node fitness processes in a Facebook wall-post network. While we uncover evidence for both preferential attachment and node fitness, thus validating the hypothesis that these processes together drive complex network evolution, we also find that node fitness plays the bigger role in determining the degree of a node. This is the first validation of its kind on real-world network data. But surprisingly the rate of preferential attachment is found to deviate from the conventional log-linear form when node fitness is taken into account. The proposed method is implemented in the R package PAFit.

 

Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks
Thong Pham, Paul Sheridan & Hidetoshi Shimodaira
Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 32558 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep32558

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See Also: https://cran.r-project.org/package=PAFit

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Node-independent elementary signaling modes: A measure of redundancy in Boolean signaling transduction networks 

The redundancy of a system denotes the amount of duplicate components or mechanisms in it. For a network, especially one in which mass or information is being transferred from an origin to a destination, redundancy is related to the robustness of the system. Existing network measures of redundancy rely on local connectivity (e.g. clustering coefficients) or the existence of multiple paths. As in many systems there are functional dependencies between components and paths, a measure that not only characterizes the topology of a network, but also takes into account these functional dependencies, becomes most desirable.
We propose a network redundancy measure in a prototypical model that contains functionally dependent directed paths: a Boolean model of a signal transduction network. The functional dependencies are made explicit by using an expanded network and the concept of elementary signaling modes (ESMs). We define the redundancy of a Boolean signal transduction network as the maximum number of node-independent ESMs and develop a methodology for identifying all maximal node-independent ESM combinations. We apply our measure to a number of signal transduction network models and show that it successfully distills known properties of the systems and offers new functional insights. The concept can be easily extended to similar related forms, e.g. edge-independent ESMs.

 

Node-independent elementary signaling modes: A measure of redundancy in Boolean signaling transduction networks
ZHONGYAO SUN, RÉKA ALBERT
Network Science , Volume 4 , Issue 03 , September 2016, pp 273 - 292
doi: 10.1017/nws.2016.4

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Grand Challenges for Global Brain Sciences

The next grand challenges for society and science are in the brain sciences. A collection of 60+ scientists from around the world, together with 10+ observers from national, private, and foundations, spent two days together discussing the top challenges that we could solve as a global community in the next decade. We eventually settled on three challenges, spanning anatomy, physiology, and medicine. Addressing all three challenges requires novel computational infrastructure. The group proposed the advent of The International Brain Station (TIBS), to address these challenges, and launch brain sciences to the next level of understanding.
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Information leverage in interconnected ecosystems: Overcoming the curse of dimensionality

In ecological analysis, complexity has been regarded as an obstacle to overcome. Here we present a straightforward approach for addressing complexity in dynamic interconnected systems. We show that complexity, in the form of multiple interacting components, can actually be an asset for studying natural systems from temporal data. The central idea is that multidimensional time series enable system dynamics to be reconstructed from multiple viewpoints, and these viewpoints can be combined into a single model. We show how our approach, multiview embedding (MVE), can improve forecasts for simulated ecosystems and a mesocosm experiment. By leveraging complexity, MVE is particularly effective for overcoming the limitations of short and noisy time series and should be highly relevant for many areas of science.

 

Information leverage in interconnected ecosystems: Overcoming the curse of dimensionality
Hao Ye, George Sugihara

Science  26 Aug 2016:
Vol. 353, Issue 6302, pp. 922-925
DOI: 10.1126/science.aag0863

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2016 Report | One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100)

2016 Report | One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100) | Papers | Scoop.it

This report is the first in a series to be issued at regular intervals as a part of the One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100). Starting from a charge given by the AI100 Standing Committee to consider the likely influences of AI in a typical North American city by the year 2030, the 2015 Study Panel, comprising experts in AI and other relevant areas focused their attention on eight domains they considered most salient: transportation; service robots; healthcare; education; low-resource communities; public safety and security; employment and workplace; and entertainment. In each of these domains, the report both reflects on progress in the past fifteen years and anticipates developments in the coming fifteen years. 

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nukem777's curator insight, September 4, 2016 7:05 AM
The One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, launched in the fall of 2014, is a longterm investigation of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its influences on people, their communities, and society.

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The end of Moore's law: Living without an exponential increase in the efficiency of computational facilities

Since more than 50 years scientific and nonscientific communities are accustomed to computational facilities, which increase steadily in speed and efficiency of calculations, in particular in processor performance, memory size, and storage capacity. Mitchell Waldrop analyzes the current situation in the chip producing industry and predicts the end of Moore's prophecy of an exponential growth in computational capacities [1]. Here, an attempt is made to view with the eyes of a user the spectacular development of computers, its benefits for mathematics, science, and engineering as well as the possible consequences of its end.

 

The end of Moore's law: Living without an exponential increase in the efficiency of computational facilities
Peter Schuster

Complexity

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Self-organization of signal transduction.

We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

 

Scheler G. Self-organization of signal transduction [version 1; referees: 2 approved]. F1000Research 2013, 2:116 (doi: 10.12688/f1000research.2-116.v1)

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The Evolutionary Origins of Hierarchy

Hierarchy is a ubiquitous organizing principle in biology, and a key reason evolution produces complex, evolvable organisms, yet its origins are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate for the first time that hierarchy evolves as a result of the costs of network connections. We confirm a previous finding that connection costs drive the evolution of modularity, and show that they also cause the evolution of hierarchy. We further confirm that hierarchy promotes evolvability in addition to evolvability caused by modularity. Because many biological and human-made phenomena can be represented as networks, and because hierarchy is a critical network property, this finding is immediately relevant to a wide array of fields, from biology, sociology, and medical research to harnessing evolution for engineering.

 

Mengistu H, Huizinga J, Mouret J-B, Clune J (2016) The Evolutionary Origins of Hierarchy. PLoS Comput Biol 12(6): e1004829. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004829

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Bottles, bags, ropes and toothbrushes: the struggle to track ocean plastics

Bottles, bags, ropes and toothbrushes: the struggle to track ocean plastics | Papers | Scoop.it
Scientists know that there is a colossal amount of plastic in the oceans. But they don’t know where it all is, what it looks like or what damage it does.
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Caging and Uncaging Genetics

Caging and Uncaging Genetics | Papers | Scoop.it

It is important for biology to understand if observations made in highly reductionist laboratory settings generalise to harsh and noisy natural environments in which genetic variation is sorted to produce adaptation. But what do we learn by studying, in the laboratory, a genetically diverse population that mirrors the wild? What is the best design for studying genetic variation? When should we consider it at all? The right experimental approach depends on what you want to know.

 

Little TJ, Colegrave N (2016) Caging and Uncaging Genetics. PLoS Biol 14(7): e1002525. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002525

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Enabling Persistent Autonomy for Underwater Gliders with Ocean Model Predictions and Terrain-Based Navigation

Effective study of ocean processes requires sampling over the duration of long (weeks to months) oscillation patterns. Such sampling requires persistent, autonomous underwater vehicles that have a similarly, long deployment duration. The spatiotemporal dynamics of the ocean environment, coupled with limited communication capabilities, make navigation and localization difficult, especially in coastal regions where the majority of interesting phenomena occur. In this paper, we consider the combination of two methods for reducing navigation and localization error: a predictive approach based on ocean model predictions and a prior information approach derived from terrain-based navigation. The motivation for this work is not only for real-time state estimation but also for accurately reconstructing the actual path that the vehicle traversed to contextualize the gathered data, with respect to the science question at hand. We present an application for the practical use of priors and predictions for large-scale ocean sampling. This combined approach builds upon previous works by the authors and accurately localizes the traversed path of an underwater glider over long-duration, ocean deployments. The proposed method takes advantage of the reliable, short-term predictions of an ocean model, and the utility of priors used in terrain-based navigation over areas of significant bathymetric relief to bound uncertainty error in dead-reckoning navigation. This method improves upon our previously published works by (1) demonstrating the utility of our terrain-based navigation method with multiple field trials and (2) presenting a hybrid algorithm that combines both approaches to bound navigational error and uncertainty for long-term deployments of underwater vehicles. We demonstrate the approach by examining data from actual field trials with autonomous underwater gliders and demonstrate an ability to estimate geographical location of an underwater glider to <100 m over paths of length >2 km. Utilizing the combined algorithm, we are able to prescribe an uncertainty bound for navigation and instruct the glider to surface if that bound is exceeded during a given mission.

 

Enabling Persistent Autonomy for Underwater Gliders with Ocean Model Predictions and Terrain-Based Navigation
Andrew Stuntz, Jonathan Scott Kelly and Ryan N. Smith

Front. Robot. AI, 29 April 2016 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2016.00023

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The co-evolution of power and friendship networks in an organization

Despite the pivotal role that both power and interpersonal trust play in a multitude of social exchange situations, relatively little is known about their interplay. Moreover, previous theorizing makes competing claims. Do we consider our relatively more powerful exchange partners to be less trustworthy, as rational choice reasoning would suggest? Or do more complex psychological mechanisms lead us to trust them more, as motivated cognition reasoning implies? Extending the latter approach, we develop and empirically test three hypotheses on the interrelation between perceptions of interpersonal trust and power. According to the status value hypothesis, individuals are more likely to befriend those whom they or others perceive as powerful. The status signaling hypothesis states that the friends of people one perceives as powerful will also be seen as powerful. According to the self-monitoring hypothesis, high self-monitors are more likely than low self-monitors to befriend those they or others perceive as powerful. We use multiplex stochastic actor-based models to analyze the co-evolution of trust and power relations among n = 49 employees in a Dutch Youth Care organization. Data covers three waves of a longitudinal sociometric network survey collected over a period of 18 months in the years 2009–2010. In general, we find some support for all three hypotheses, though the effects are weak. Being one of the first organizational field studies on the co-evolution of power and trust, we conclude with discussing the implications of these findings for the study of social exchange processes.

 

The co-evolution of power and friendship networks in an organization
ALONA LABUN, RAFAEL WITTEK, CHRISTIAN STEGLICH
Network Science , Volume 4 , Issue 03 , September 2016, pp 364 - 384
doi: 10.1017/nws.2016.7

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Adaptive Cities: A Cybernetic Perspective on Urban Systems

Adaptive Cities: A Cybernetic Perspective on Urban Systems | Papers | Scoop.it

Cities are changing constantly. All urban systems face different conditions from day to day. Even when averaged regularities can be found, urban systems will be more efficient if they can adapt to changes at the same speeds at which these occur. Technology can assist humans in achieving this adaptation. Inspired by cybernetics, we propose a description of cities as adaptive systems. We identify three main components: information, algorithms, and agents, which we illustrate with current and future examples. The implications of adaptive cities are manifold, with direct impacts on mobility, sustainability, resilience, governance, and society. Still, the potential of adaptive cities will not depend so much on technology as on how we use it.

 

Adaptive Cities: A Cybernetic Perspective on Urban Systems
Carlos Gershenson, Paolo Santi, Carlo Ratti

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Coupled dynamics of node and link states in complex networks: A model for language competition

Inspired by language competition processes, we present a model of coupled evolution of node and link states. In particular, we focus on the interplay between the use of a language and the preference or attitude of the speakers towards it, which we model, respectively, as a property of the interactions between speakers (a link state) and as a property of the speakers themselves (a node state). Furthermore, we restrict our attention to the case of two socially equivalent languages and to socially inspired network topologies based on a mechanism of triadic closure. As opposed to most of the previous literature, where language extinction is an inevitable outcome of the dynamics, we find a broad range of possible asymptotic configurations, which we classify as: frozen extinction states, frozen coexistence states, and dynamically trapped coexistence states. Moreover, metastable coexistence states with very long survival times and displaying a non-trivial dynamics are found to be abundant. Interestingly, a system size scaling analysis shows, on the one hand, that the probability of language extinction vanishes exponentially for increasing system sizes and, on the other hand, that the time scale of survival of the non-trivial dynamical metastable states increases linearly with the size of the system. Thus, non-trivial dynamical coexistence is the only possible outcome for large enough systems. Finally, we show how this coexistence is characterized by one of the languages becoming clearly predominant while the other one becomes increasingly confined to "ghetto-like" structures: small groups of bilingual speakers arranged in triangles, with a strong preference for the minority language, and using it for their intra-group interactions while they switch to the predominant language for communications with the rest of the population.

 

Coupled dynamics of node and link states in complex networks: A model for language competition
Adrián Carro, Raúl Toral, Maxi San Miguel

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Unifying Markov Chain Approach for Disease and Rumor Spreading in Complex Networks

Spreading processes are ubiquitous in natural and artificial systems. They can be studied via a plethora of models, depending on the specific details of the phenomena under study. Disease contagion and rumor spreading are among the most important of these processes due to their practical relevance. However, despite the similarities between them, current models address both spreading dynamics separately. In this paper, we propose a general information spreading model that is based on discrete time Markov chains. The model includes all the transitions that are plausible for both a disease contagion process and rumor propagation. We show that our model not only covers the traditional spreading schemes, but that it also contains some features relevant in social dynamics, such as apathy, forgetting, and lost/recovering of interest. The model is evaluated analytically to obtain the spreading thresholds and the early time dynamical behavior for the contact and reactive processes in several scenarios. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations shows that the Markov chain formalism is highly accurate while it excels in computational efficiency. We round off our work by showing how the proposed framework can be applied to the study of spreading processes occurring on social networks.

 

Unifying Markov Chain Approach for Disease and Rumor Spreading in Complex Networks

Guilherme Ferraz de Arruda, Francisco A. Rodrigues, Pablo Martin Rodriiguez, Emanuele Cozzo, Yamir Moreno

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Statistical physics of vaccination

Historically, infectious diseases caused considerable damage to human societies, and they continue to do so today. To help reduce their impact, mathematical models of disease transmission have been studied to help understand disease dynamics and inform prevention strategies. Vaccination - one of the most important preventive measures of modern times - is of great interest both theoretically and empirically. And in contrast to traditional approaches, recent research increasingly explores the pivotal implications of individual behavior and heterogeneous contact patterns in populations. Our report reviews the developmental arc of theoretical epidemiology with emphasis on vaccination, as it led from classical models assuming homogeneously mixing (mean-field) populations and ignoring human behavior, to recent models that account for behavioral feedback and/or population spatial/social structure. Many of the methods used originated in statistical physics, such as lattice and network models, and their associated analytical frameworks. Similarly, the feedback loop between vaccinating behavior and disease propagation forms a coupled nonlinear system with analogs in physics. We also review the new paradigm of digital epidemiology, wherein sources of digital data such as online social media are mined for high-resolution information on epidemiologically relevant individual behavior. Armed with the tools and concepts of statistical physics, and further assisted by new sources of digital data, models that capture nonlinear interactions between behavior and disease dynamics offer a novel way of modeling real-world phenomena, and can help improve health outcomes. We conclude the review by discussing open problems in the field and promising directions for future research.

 

Statistical physics of vaccination
Zhen Wang, Chris T. Bauch, Samit Bhattacharyya, Alberto d'Onofrio, Piero Manfredi, Matjaz Perc, Nicola Perra, Marcel Salathé, Dawei Zhao

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Combining satellite imagery and machine learning to predict poverty

Reliable data on economic livelihoods remain scarce in the developing world, hampering efforts to study these outcomes and to design policies that improve them. Here we demonstrate an accurate, inexpensive, and scalable method for estimating consumption expenditure and asset wealth from high-resolution satellite imagery. Using survey and satellite data from five African countries—Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, and Rwanda—we show how a convolutional neural network can be trained to identify image features that can explain up to 75% of the variation in local-level economic outcomes. Our method, which requires only publicly available data, could transform efforts to track and target poverty in developing countries. It also demonstrates how powerful machine learning techniques can be applied in a setting with limited training data, suggesting broad potential application across many scientific domains.

 

Combining satellite imagery and machine learning to predict poverty
Neal Jean, Marshall Burke, Michael Xie, W. Matthew Davis, David B. Lobell, Stefano Ermon

Science  19 Aug 2016:
Vol. 353, Issue 6301, pp. 790-794
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf7894

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Networks: An Economic Perspective

We discuss social network analysis from the perspective of economics. We organize the presentaion around the theme of externalities: the effects that one's behavior has on others' well-being. Externalities underlie the interdependencies that make networks interesting. We discuss network formation, as well as interactions between peoples' behaviors within a given network, and the implications in a variety of settings. Finally, we highlight some empirical challenges inherent in the statistical analysis of network-based data.

 

Networks: An Economic Perspective
Matthew O. Jackson, Brian W. Rogers, Yves Zenou

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New optical material offers unprecedented control of light and thermal radiation

New optical material offers unprecedented control of light and thermal radiation | Papers | Scoop.it
A team led by Nanfang Yu, assistant professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, has discovered a new phase-transition optical material and demonstrated novel devices that dynamically control light over a much broader wavelength range and with larger modulation amplitude than what has currently been possible. The team, including researchers from Purdue, Harvard, Drexel, and Brookhaven National Laboratory, found that samarium nickelate (SmNiO3) can be electrically tuned continuously between a transparent and an opaque state over an unprecedented broad range of spectrum from the blue in the visible (wavelength of 400 nm) to the thermal radiation spectrum in the mid-infrared (wavelength of a few tens of micrometers).
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Computing Biology

Computing Biology | Papers | Scoop.it
Is Computational Biology increasingly—and steadily—progressing toward addressing the mammoth challenge of actually computing biology? That is, have we reached the stage where we do not support biological research but drive it? This question is vitally important for all—young and established computational biologists. Even though forecasting future research can be risky, we still venture to predict that the future will see considerably more research projects drifting toward this ambitious aspiration. Computational Biology is powerful for abstracting signatures of disease, for predicting it, and for proposing medications. It is effective in figuring out disease mechanisms and forceful in bridging experimental disciplines to obtain testable predictions. However, perhaps its biggest challenges lie in putting together the available broad and disparate information, devising tools to efficiently and effectively carry out these tasks while sifting through noise and recognizing cell specificity, and most importantly coming up with sound, coherent, and testable schemes.

 

Nussinov R, Papin JA (2016) Computing Biology. PLoS Comput Biol 12(7): e1005050. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005050

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Arjen ten Have's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:30 AM
Interesting read on the driving source of biological research: Computing Biology?
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Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks

Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks | Papers | Scoop.it

As public health agencies strive to harness big data to improve outbreak surveillance, they face the challenge of extracting meaningful information that can be directly used to improve public health, without incurring additional costs. In this article, we address the question: Which nodes in a social network should be selectively monitored to detect and monitor outbreaks as early and accurately as possible? We derive best-case performance scenarios, and show that a practical strategy for data collection–recruiting friends of randomly selected individuals–is expected to perform reasonably well, in terms of the timing and reliability of the epidemiological information collected.

 

Herrera JL, Srinivasan R, Brownstein JS, Galvani AP, Meyers LA (2016) Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks. PLoS Comput Biol 12(7): e1004928. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004928

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Ten Simple Rules for Writing a Postdoctoral Fellowship

Rule 1: Start Early and Gather Critical Information
Rule 2: Create a Game Plan and Write Regularly
Rule 3: Find Your Research Niche
Rule 4: Use Your Specific Aims Document as Your Roadmap
Rule 5: Build a First-Rate Team of Mentors
Rule 6: Develop a Complete Career Development Training Plan
Rule 7: STOP! Get Feedback
Rule 8: Tell a Consistent and Cohesive Story
Rule 9: Follow Specific Requirements and Proofread for Errors and Readability
Rule 10: Recycle and Resubmit

 

Yuan K, Cai L, Ngok SP, Ma L, Botham CM (2016) Ten Simple Rules for Writing a Postdoctoral Fellowship. PLoS Comput Biol 12(7): e1004934. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004934

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My Text in Your Handwriting

My Text in Your Handwriting | Papers | Scoop.it

There are many scenarios where we wish to imitate a specific author's pen-on-paper handwriting style. Rendering new text in someone's handwriting is difficult because natural handwriting is highly variable, yet follows both intentional and involuntary structure that makes a person's style self-consistent.
We present an algorithm that renders a desired input string in an author's handwriting. An annotated sample of the author's handwriting is required; the system is flexible enough that historical documents can usually be used with only a little extra effort. Experiments show that our glyph-centric approach, with learned parameters for spacing, line thickness, and pressure, produces novel images of handwriting that look hand-made to casual observers, even when printed on paper.

 

My Text in Your Handwriting
Tom S.F. Haines, Oisin Mac Aodha, and Gabriel J. Brostow
University College London
Transactions on Graphics 2016

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