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Self-organization of progress across the century of physics

We make use of information provided in the titles and abstracts of over half a million publications that were published by the American Physical Society during the past 119 years. By identifying all unique words and phrases and determining their monthly usage patterns, we obtain quantifiable insights into the trends of physics discovery from the end of the 19th century to today. We show that the magnitudes of upward and downward trends yield heavy-tailed distributions, and that their emergence is due to the Matthew effect. This indicates that both the rise and fall of scientific paradigms is driven by robust principles of self-organization. Data also confirm that periods of war decelerate scientific progress, and that the later is very much subject to globalization.

 

Self-organization of progress across the century of physics

Matjaz Perc

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.0552

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The infection tree of global epidemics

The spreading of transmissible infectious diseases is inevitably entangled with the dynamics of human population. Humans are the carrier of the pathogen, and the large-scale travel and commuting patterns that govern the mobility of modern societies are defining how epidemics and pandemics travel across the world. For a long time, the development of quantitative spatially explicit models able to shed light on the global dynamics of pandemic has been limited by the lack of detailed data on human mobility. In the last 10 years, however, these limits have been lifted by the increasing availability of data generated by new information technologies, thus triggering the development of computational (microsimulation) models working at a level of single individuals in spatially extended regions of the world. Microsimulations can provide information at very detailed spatial resolutions and down to the level of single individuals. In addition, computational implementations explicitly account for stochasticity, allowing the study of multiple realizations of epidemics with the same parameters' distribution. While on the one hand these capabilities represent the richness of microsimulation methods, on the other hand they face us with a huge amount of information that requires the use of specific data reduction methods and visual analytics.


The infection tree of global epidemics
ANA PASTORE Y PIONTTI, MARCELO FERREIRA DA COSTA GOMES, NICOLE SAMAY, NICOLA PERRA and ALESSANDRO VESPIGNANI

Network Science
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/nws.2014.5


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Galvanotactic control of collective cell migration in epithelial monolayers

Many normal and pathological biological processes involve the migration of epithelial cell sheets. This arises from complex emergent behaviour resulting from the interplay between cellular signalling networks and the forces that physically couple the cells. Here, we demonstrate that collective migration of an epithelium can be interactively guided by applying electric fields that bias the underlying signalling networks. We show that complex, spatiotemporal cues are locally interpreted by the epithelium, resulting in rapid, coordinated responses such as a collective U-turn, divergent migration, and unchecked migration against an obstacle. We observed that the degree of external control depends on the size and shape of the cell population, and on the existence of physical coupling between cells. Together, our results offer design and engineering principles for the rational manipulation of the collective behaviour and material properties of a tissue.


Galvanotactic control of collective cell migration in epithelial monolayers
• Daniel J. Cohen, W. James Nelson & Michel M. Maharbiz

Nature Materials 13, 409–417 (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmat3891

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Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks

Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks | Papers | Scoop.it

Our empirical analysis demonstrates that in the chosen network data sets, nodes which had a high Closeness Centrality also had a high Eccentricity Centrality. Likewise high Degree Centrality also correlated closely with a high Eigenvector Centrality. Whereas Betweenness Centrality varied according to network topology and did not demonstrate any noticeable pattern. In terms of identification of key nodes, we discovered that as compared with other centrality measures, Eigenvector and Eccentricity Centralities were better able to identify important nodes.


Batool K, Niazi MA (2014) Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks. PLoS ONE 9(4): e90283. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090283

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 15, 10:50 PM

Love this stuff.

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Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism, by Edgar Morin

This article is based on the keynote address presented to the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR) in 2012, on the occasion of Edgar Morin receiving the Bertalanffy Prize in Complexity Thinking, awarded by the Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS).
The following theses will be elaborated on: (a) The whole is at the same time more and less than its parts; (b) We must abandon the term "object" for systems because all the objects are systems and parts of systems; (c) System and organization are the two faces of the same reality; (d) Eco-systems illustrate self-organization.


Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism
Edgar Morin

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/257

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 10:21 PM

There is a kind of meditation in Buddhist practice known as analytical meditation.  It's purpose is to inform us about an object, all of its properties and all of the associations, connections and contexts that it can have in the individual and collective sense. 

 

We're not going to be perfect coming up with all of the connections all of the time.  However, I think it's a good starting basis for the purposes of analyzing complex systems and all of the layered, interconnected parts.  We are one, and one is all.

 

The universe is us as well as around us.


And that's a scientific fact, it seems.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 14, 2:37 PM

objects versus systems?

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Poverty, Disease, and the Ecology of Complex Systems

Understanding why some human populations remain persistently poor remains a significant challenge for both the social and natural sciences. The extremely poor are generally reliant on their immediate natural resource base for subsistence and suffer high rates of mortality due to parasitic and infectious diseases. Economists have developed a range of models to explain persistent poverty, often characterized as poverty traps, but these rarely account for complex biophysical processes. In this Essay, we argue that by coupling insights from ecology and economics, we can begin to model and understand the complex dynamics that underlie the generation and maintenance of poverty traps, which can then be used to inform analyses and possible intervention policies. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we present a simple coupled model of infectious diseases and economic growth, where poverty traps emerge from nonlinear relationships determined by the number of pathogens in the system. These nonlinearities are comparable to those often incorporated into poverty trap models in the economics literature, but, importantly, here the mechanism is anchored in core ecological principles. Coupled models of this sort could be usefully developed in many economically important biophysical systems—such as agriculture, fisheries, nutrition, and land use change—to serve as foundations for deeper explorations of how fundamental ecological processes influence structural poverty and economic development.


Ngonghala CN, Pluciński MM, Murray MB, Farmer PE, Barrett CB, et al. (2014) Poverty, Disease, and the Ecology of Complex Systems. PLoS Biol 12(4): e1001827. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001827

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 13, 10:48 AM

Essence of this work: In this Essay, we argue that by coupling insights from ecology and economics, we can begin to model and understand the complex dynamics that underlie the generation and maintenance of poverty traps, which can then be used to inform analyses and possible intervention policies.


Important insights for cities....

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Migratory Animals Couple Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning Worldwide

Animal migrations span the globe, involving immense numbers of individuals from a wide range of taxa. Migrants transport nutrients, energy, and other organisms as they forage and are preyed upon throughout their journeys. These highly predictable, pulsed movements across large spatial scales render migration a potentially powerful yet underappreciated dimension of biodiversity that is intimately embedded within resident communities. We review examples from across the animal kingdom to distill fundamental processes by which migratory animals influence communities and ecosystems, demonstrating that they can uniquely alter energy flow, food-web topology and stability, trophic cascades, and the structure of metacommunities. Given the potential for migration to alter ecological networks worldwide, we suggest an integrative framework through which community dynamics and ecosystem functioning may explicitly consider animal migrations.


Migratory Animals Couple Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning Worldwide
S. Bauer, B. J. Hoye

Science 4 April 2014:
Vol. 344 no. 6179
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1242552 ;

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Information: A Personal Synthesis

This article is an attempt to capture, in a reasonable space, some of the major developments and currents of thought in information theory and the relations between them. I have particularly tried to include changes in the views of key authors in the field. The domains addressed range from mathematical-categorial, philosophical and computational approaches to systems, causal-compositional, biological and religious approaches and messaging theory. I have related key concepts in each domain to my non-standard extension of logic to real processes that I call Logic in Reality (LIR). The result is not another attempt at a General Theory of Information such as that of Burgin, or a Unified Theory of Information like that of Hofkirchner. It is not a compendium of papers presented at a conference, more or less unified around a particular theme. It is rather a highly personal, limited synthesis which nonetheless may facilitate comparison of insights, including contradictory ones, from different lines of inquiry. As such, it may be an example of the concept proposed by Marijuan, still little developed, of the recombination of knowledge. Like the best of the work to which it refers, the finality of this synthesis is the possible contribution that an improved understanding of the nature and dynamics of information may make to the ethical development of the information society.


Information: A Personal Synthesis
by Joseph Brenner
Information 2014, 5(1), 134-170; doi:10.3390/info5010134
http://www.mdpi.com/2078-2489/5/1/134/ 

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 1:57 PM

All information that we receive from the universe that is around us is second hand.  It is possible to alter and shift them out of our own volition or of the volition of someone else, provided that we're either caught unawares or allowing it to happen just as it is theoretically possible to shift the universe around us, so that we experience something different than what would ordinarily happen (again, only theoretically, not necessarily in actuality).  The universe is out there, I think, just as we're most certainly apart of it.  There are laws to this place as well which influence and effect our abilities to act, our perception of the choices that we have and the choices that we actually are left with at the end of the day, when all's said and told.  We are just receptors, analyzers and synthesizers of information with our biological bodies.  We are all slaves, ultimately, to our biology, our circumstances and the consequences of our actions.

 

Just my two cents on information.

 

Think about it.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 12, 5:46 AM

Brenner and Daniel Cohnitz have a very good book about the subject "Information and Information Flow" that covers almost all aspects of Information Theory. Unfortunatelly the 'Matecmatical Information Theory' of Jan Kahre didn't have yet the same attention.

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Which forces reduce entropy production?

A real pendulum with friction will oscillate for a while after a short push but will eventually come to rest close to a location where is potential energy has a minimum. If the system is closed, that means, without a source of energy, it will eventually stop moving at a location near a minimum of the potential, no matter what type of friction force acts on the pendulum. This “variation principle” is a simple concept to predict the long-term behavior of mechanical systems, even if the details of the friction forces are unknown.
For many years, scientist tried to find a similarly simple variation principle for systems with a source of energy such as a periodic forcing function or a battery in electrical systems [1]. Prigogine suggested that time rate of entropy production is at a minimum at stationary states [2]. Later the concept of entropy was generalized and used to describe the dynamics and stationary states of open dissipative systems [3-7].


Which forces reduce entropy production?
Alfred Hubler
Complexity
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cplx.21532 ;


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Revealing the structure of the world airline network

Resilience of most critical infrastructures against failure of elements that appear insignificant is usually taken for granted. The World Airline Network (WAN) is an infrastructure that reduces the geographical gap between societies, both small and large, and brings forth economic gains. With the extensive use of a publicly maintained data set that contains information about airports and alternative connections between these airports, we empirically reveal that the WAN is a redundant and resilient network for long distance air travel, but otherwise breaks down completely due to removal of short and apparently insignificant connections. These short range connections with moderate number of passengers and alternate flights are the connections that keep remote parts of the world accessible. It is surprising, insofar as there exists a highly resilient and strongly connected core consisting of a small fraction of airports (around 2.3%) together with an extremely fragile star-like periphery. Yet, in spite of their relevance, more than 90% of the world airports are still interconnected upon removal of this core. With standard and unconventional removal measures we compare both empirical and topological perceptions for the fragmentation of the world. We identify how the WAN is organized into different classes of clusters based on the physical proximity of airports and analyze the consequence of this fragmentation.


Revealing the structure of the world airline network
Trivik Verma, Nuno A. M. Araújo, Hans J Herrmann

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.1368

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Network Weirdness: Exploring the Origins of Network Paradoxes

Social networks have many counter-intuitive properties, including the "friendship paradox" that states, on average, your friends have more friends than you do. Recently, a variety of other paradoxes were demonstrated in online social networks. This paper explores the origins of these network paradoxes. Specifically, we ask whether they arise from mathematical properties of the networks or whether they have a behavioral origin. We show that sampling from heavy-tailed distributions always gives rise to a paradox in the mean, but not the median. We propose a strong form of network paradoxes, based on utilizing the median, and validate it empirically using data from two online social networks. Specifically, we show that for any user the majority of user's friends and followers have more friends, followers, etc. than the user, and that this cannot be explained by statistical properties of sampling. Next, we explore the behavioral origins of the paradoxes by using the shuffle test to remove correlations between node degrees and attributes. We find that paradoxes for the mean persist in the shuffled network, but not for the median. We demonstrate that strong paradoxes arise due to the assortativity of user attributes, including degree, and correlation between degree and attribute.


Network Weirdness: Exploring the Origins of Network Paradoxes
Farshad Kooti, Nathan O. Hodas, Kristina Lerman

http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.7242

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António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 10, 8:06 AM

Some network insights into the vague notion of popularity.

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Behavioral and Network Origins of Wealth Inequality: Insights from a Virtual World

Almost universally, wealth is not distributed uniformly within societies or economies. Even though wealth data have been collected in various forms for centuries, the origins for the observed wealth-disparity and social inequality are not yet fully understood. Especially the impact and connections of human behavior on wealth could so far not be inferred from data. Here we study wealth data from the virtual economy of the massive multiplayer online game (MMOG) Pardus. This data not only contains every player's wealth at every point in time, but also all actions of every player over a timespan of almost a decade. We find that wealth distributions in the virtual world are very similar to those in western countries. In particular we find an approximate exponential for low wealth and a power-law tail. The Gini index is found to be
g=0.65, which is close to the indices of many Western countries. We find that wealth-increase rates depend on the time when players entered the game. Players that entered the game early on tend to have remarkably higher wealth-increase rates than those who joined later. Studying the players' positions within their social networks, we find that the local position in the trade network is most relevant for wealth. Wealthy people have high in- and out-degree in the trade network, relatively low nearest-neighbor degree and a low clustering coefficient. Wealthy players have many mutual friendships and are socially well respected by others, but spend more time on business than on socializing. We find that players that are not organized within social groups with at least three members are significantly poorer on average. We observe that high `political' status and high wealth go hand in hand. Wealthy players have few personal enemies, but show animosity towards players that behave as public enemies.


Behavioral and Network Origins of Wealth Inequality: Insights from a Virtual World
Benedikt Fuchs, Stefan Thurner

http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.6342

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Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience

Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience | Papers | Scoop.it

The confluence of new approaches in recording patterns of brain connectivity and quantitative analytic tools from network science has opened new avenues toward understanding the organization and function of brain networks. Descriptive network models of brain structural and functional connectivity have made several important contributions; for example, in the mapping of putative network hubs and network communities. Building on the importance of anatomical and functional interactions, network models have provided insight into the basic structures and mechanisms that enable integrative neural processes. Network models have also been instrumental in understanding the role of structural brain networks in generating spatially and temporally organized brain activity. Despite these contributions, network models are subject to limitations in methodology and interpretation, and they face many challenges as brain connectivity data sets continue to increase in detail and complexity.


Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience
• Olaf Sporns
Nature Neuroscience (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3690

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Innovations in Statistical Physics

In 1963-71, a group of people, myself included, formulated and perfected a new approach to physics problems, which eventually came to be known under the names of scaling, universality, and renormalization. This work formed the basis of a wide variety of theories ranging from its starting point in critical phenomena, and moving out to particle physics and relativity and then into economics and biology. This work was of transcendental beauty and of considerable intellectual importance.
This left me with a personal problem. What next? Constructing the answer to that question would dominate the next 45 years of my professional life. I would try to:
* Help in finding and constructing new fields of science
* Do research and give talks on science/society borderline
* Provide helpful, constructive criticism of scientific and technical work
* Help students and younger scientists
* Demonstrate scientific leadership


Innovations in Statistical Physics
Leo P. Kadanoff

http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.6464

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Synthetic biology: Biocircuits in synchrony

Synthetic biology: Biocircuits in synchrony | Papers | Scoop.it

A major goal of synthetic biology is to build reliable, predictable networks of molecular and cellular components that can work as new biological devices capable of, for example, sensing chemicals, manufacturing drugs or even fighting disease. However, achieving such goals entails the production of complex synthetic biocircuits, which requires synchronization of multiple components. Although synchronization is well established in electronics1, synchronizing living cells is a major challenge, because it demands correlation of different phenomena that may be taking place on different temporal and spatial scales. (...) Prindle et al. report that such coupling has been achieved in cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli.


Synthetic biology: Biocircuits in synchrony
Ricard Solé & Javier Macía

Nature (2014)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13224 ;


Rapid and tunable post-translational coupling of genetic circuits
Arthur Prindle, Jangir Selimkhanov, Howard Li, Ivan Razinkov, Lev S. Tsimring & Jeff Hasty
Nature (2014)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13238

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Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People—by DJing

Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People—by DJing | Papers | Scoop.it

“Our research—the notion of feedback and complex systems—informs everything we do. A DJ and an audience are a cybernetic system, controlling each other’s state.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 16, 8:15 PM

From a government to a society, to a DJ and an audience....to a Master/Mistress and a "slave", it's all the same stuff.

 

It's a dialectic; a dialogue without words.  It's motion, it's energy, action, perception....everything that relates to a human(s)-human(s) relationship.

 

It's amazing to me that so many of the people who hold power at the moment seem to have no conscious or sub-conscious conception of these principles.  That's how they're going to be thrown out by the mob, just because of their ideological views and their incorrectly perceived self-interests.  They just know the brutal, the club.  They seem to neither know or understand anything about the energy dynamic that's at stake between the two "sides".

 

Incredible that so many people could rise without knowing or understanding or comprehending or even wishing to know, comprehend and understand these things.

 

Silly people.

 

Think about it.

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Why marathons have runner 'traffic jams'

Why marathons have runner 'traffic jams' | Papers | Scoop.it

How do such crowding problems arise, and could they be reduced? Some researchers believe that we can find the answers through a more familiar system in which jams appear – road traffic flow. Martin Treiber, of the Technical University of Dresden in Germany, has previously developed models for traffic flow, and now he has reported modifications that capture the essential details of sporting events such as marathons.


http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140409-why-marathons-are-like-road-jams

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Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?

The generality of network properties allows the utilization of the ‘wisdom’ of biological systems surviving crisis events for many millions of years. Yeast protein-protein interaction network shows a decrease in community-overlap (an increase in community cohesion) in stress. Community rearrangement seems to be a cost-efficient, general crisis-management response of complex systems. Inter-community bridges, such as the highly dynamic ‘creative nodes’ emerge as crucial determinants helping crisis survival.


Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?
Péter Csermely, Agoston Mihalik, Zsolt Vassy, András London

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology

Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/115 

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 13, 10:46 AM

Love the insights generated by looking at existing systems and how one could apply or learn from how they function in a different context - rich with insight and ideas.

Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 6:54 PM

Interesting.

 

Check it out.

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Hierarchical Block Structures and High-Resolution Model Selection in Large Networks

Hierarchical Block Structures and High-Resolution Model Selection in Large Networks | Papers | Scoop.it

Social, technological, and biological networks are known to organize into modules or “communities.” Characterizing and identifying modules is highly nontrivial and still an outstanding problem in networks research. A new approach uses both the concept of modular hierarchy for network construction and the methods of statistical inference to address this problem, succeeding where the existing approaches see difficulties.


Hierarchical Block Structures and High-Resolution Model Selection in Large Networks
Tiago P. Peixoto
Phys. Rev. X 4, 011047 (2014)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevX.4.011047

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Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells

Biofilms are multifunctional and environmentally responsive assemblies of living and non-living components. By using synthetic gene networks in engineered cells to regulate the production of extracellular amyloid fibrils, and by interfacing the fibrils with inorganic materials such as metal nanoparticles, stimuli-responsive synthetic biofilms with switchable functions and tunable composition and structure have now been produced.


Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells
• Allen Y. Chen, Zhengtao Deng, Amanda N. Billings, Urartu O. S. Seker, Michelle Y. Lu, Robert J. Citorik, Bijan Zakeri & Timothy K. Lu

Nature Materials (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmat3912

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Information Flow in Animal-Robot Interactions

The nonverbal transmission of information between social animals is a primary driving force behind their actions and, therefore, an important quantity to measure in animal behavior studies. Despite its key role in social behavior, the flow of information has only been inferred by correlating the actions of individuals with a simplifying assumption of linearity. In this paper, we leverage information-theoretic tools to relax this assumption. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we focus on a robotics-based experimental paradigm, which affords consistent and controllable delivery of visual stimuli to zebrafish. Specifically, we use a robotic arm to maneuver a life-sized replica of a zebrafish in a predetermined trajectory as it interacts with a focal subject in a test tank. We track the fish and the replica through time and use the resulting trajectory data to measure the transfer entropy between the replica and the focal subject, which, in turn, is used to quantify one-directional information flow from the robot to the fish. In agreement with our expectations, we find that the information flow from the replica to the zebrafish is significantly more than the other way around. Notably, such information is specifically related to the response of the fish to the replica, whereby we observe that the information flow is reduced significantly if the motion of the replica is randomly delayed in a surrogate dataset. In addition, comparison with a control experiment, where the replica is replaced by a conspecific, shows that the information flow toward the focal fish is significantly more for a robotic than a live stimulus. These findings support the reliability of using transfer entropy as a measure of information flow, while providing indirect evidence for the efficacy of a robotics-based platform in animal behavioral studies.


Information Flow in Animal-Robot Interactions
by Sachit Butail, Fabrizio Ladu, Davide Spinello and Maurizio Porfiri
Entropy 2014, 16(3), 1315-1330; doi:10.3390/e16031315
http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/16/3/1315/

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Evolutionary Multiplayer Games

Evolutionary game theory has become one of the most diverse and far reaching theories in biology. Applications of this theory range from cell dynamics to social evolution. However, many applications make it clear that inherent non-linearities of natural systems need to be taken into account. One way of introducing such non-linearities into evolutionary games is by the inclusion of multiple players. An example is of social dilemmas, where group benefits could e.g.\ increase less than linear with the number of cooperators. Such multiplayer games can be introduced in all the fields where evolutionary game theory is already well established. However, the inclusion of non-linearities can help to advance the analysis of systems which are known to be complex, e.g. in the case of non-Mendelian inheritance. We review the diachronic theory and applications of multiplayer evolutionary games and present the current state of the field. Our aim is a summary of the theoretical results from well-mixed populations in infinite as well as finite populations. We also discuss examples from three fields where the theory has been successfully applied, ecology, social sciences and population genetics. In closing, we probe certain future directions which can be explored using the complexity of multiplayer games while preserving the promise of simplicity of evolutionary games.


Evolutionary Multiplayer Games
Chaitanya S. Gokhale, Arne Traulsen

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.1421

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 9:06 AM

Very cool.

 

We're such a young species.  It's not shocking that our most important and influential positions in our society are presently occupied by no-good-niks who don't know or care to know about the reality of the universe (if they even believe and accept that there is such a thing as external reality in the first place).

 

We're still growing into our brains, such that we could easily kill ourselves of before we've come to master their actions and our actions which result from their functions.  We only have a secondary view to freality to work with and, not all people have one that is functioning properly for their own sakes and their own benefits, let alone, for everyone who falls under their jurisdiction and influence directly or indirectly.

 

Sad.

 

Think about it.

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Spreading dynamics on networks: the role of burstiness, topology and stationarity

Spreading on networks is influenced by a number of factors including different parts of the inter-event time distribution (IETD), the topology of the network and nonstationarity. In order to understand the role of these factors we study the SI model on temporal networks with different aggregated topologies and different IETDs. Based on analytic calculations and numerical simulations, we show that if the stationary bursty process is governed by power-law IETD, the spreading can be slowed down or accelerated as compared to a Poisson process; the speed is determined by the short time behaviour, which in our model is controlled by the exponent. We demonstrate that finite, so called "locally tree-like" networks, like the Barab\'asi-Albert networks behave very differently from real tree graphs if the IETD is strongly fat-tailed, as the lack or presence of rare alternative paths modifies the spreading. A further important result is that the non-stationarity of the dynamics has a significant effect on the spreading speed for strongly fat-tailed power-law IETDs, thus bursty processes characterized by small power-law exponents can cause slow spreading in the stationary state but also very rapid spreading heavily depending on the age of the processes.


Spreading dynamics on networks: the role of burstiness, topology and stationarity
Dávid X. Horváth, János Kertész

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.2468

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Eight (No, Nine!) Problems With Big Data

Eight (No, Nine!) Problems With Big Data | Papers | Scoop.it

BIG data is suddenly everywhere. Everyone seems to be collecting it, analyzing it, making money from it and celebrating (or fearing) its powers. Whether we’re talking about analyzing zillions of Google search queries to predict flu outbreaks, or zillions of phone records to detect signs of terrorist activity, or zillions of airline stats to find the best time to buy plane tickets, big data is on the case. By combining the power of modern computing with the plentiful data of the digital era, it promises to solve virtually any problem — crime, public health, the evolution of grammar, the perils of dating — just by crunching the numbers.

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Noise induces explosive synchronization

We study explosive synchronization of network-coupled oscillators. Despite recent advances it remains unclear how robust explosive synchronization is in view of realistic structural and dynamical properties. Here we show that explosive synchronization can be induced simply by adding uncorrelated noise to the oscillators' frequencies, demonstrating it is not only robust to, but moreover promoted by, this natural mechanism. We support these results numerically and analytically, presenting simulations of a real neural network as well as a self consistency theory used to study synthetic networks.


Noise induces explosive synchronization
Per Sebastian Skardal, Alex Arenas

http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.0883

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Dynamical Systems on Networks: A Tutorial

We give a tutorial for the study of dynamical systems on networks, and we focus in particular on ``simple" situations that are tractable analytically. We briefly motivate why examining dynamical systems on networks is interesting and important. We then give several fascinating examples and discuss some theoretical results. We also discuss dynamical systems on dynamical (i.e., time-dependent) networks, overview software implementations, and give our outlook on the field.


Dynamical Systems on Networks: A Tutorial
Mason A. Porter, James P. Gleeson

http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.7663

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