Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.]
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Opettaja-lehti - Juttusivu

Opettaja-lehti - Juttusivu | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it

Opettajakeskeistä työskentelytapaa ylläpitäviä dokumenttikameroita ja älytauluja ei Larun mielestä tarvita enempää. Teknologian opetuskäyttöä pitää suunnitella oppilaslähtöisesti, ja käytön on oltava pedagogisesti perusteltua.

Kai jotain kättä pitempää pitää opettajallakin olla? Larun mielestä riittää, että luokassa on videotykki tai jokin vastaava laite, joka heijastaa kuvan langattomasti seinälle opettajan ja oppilaiden päätelaitteista. Tabletti tai muu laite toimii älytauluna eikä perinteistä älytaulua tarvita lainkaan. Dokumenttikamerakin voidaan korvata tabletilla. Siihen tarvitaan vain soveltuva jalusta ja ohjelmisto.


Via Jukka Melaranta, Dafnord
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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, October 16, 2013 3:28 AM

Mielenkiintoista kuinka nopeasti tekniikka muuttuu. Älytaulut eivät enää olekaan edistyksen kärkeä...

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Parasites make mice lose fear of cats permanently, even after Toxoplasma infection is cleared

Parasites make mice lose fear of cats permanently, even after Toxoplasma infection is cleared | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it

Behavioral changes persist after Toxoplasma infection is cleared. A parasite that infects up to one-third of people around the world may have the ability to permanently alter a specific brain function in mice.

 

Toxoplasma gondii is known to remove rodents’ innate fear of cats. The new research shows that even months after infection, when parasites are no longer detectable, the effect remains. This raises the possibility that the microbe causes a permanent structural change in the brain. The microbe is a single-celled pathogen that infects most types of mammal and bird, causing a disease called toxoplasmosis. But its effects on rodents are unique; most flee cat odor, but infected ones are mildly attracted to it.

 

This is thought to be an evolutionary adaptation to help the parasite complete its life cycle: Toxoplasma can sexually reproduce only in the cat gut, and for it to get there, the pathogen's rodent host must be eaten.

 

In humans, studies have linked Toxoplasma infection with behavioral changes and schizophrenia. One work found an increased risk of traffic accidents in people infected with the parasite; another found changes in responses to cat odor. People with schizophrenia are more likely than the general population to have been infected with Toxoplasma, and medications used to treat schizophrenia may work in part by inhibiting the pathogen's replication.

 

Schizophrenia is thought to involve excess activity of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. This has bolstered one possible explanation for Toxoplasma’s behavioral effect: the parasite establishes persistent infections by means of microscopic cysts that grow slowly in brain cells. It can increase those cells’ production of dopamine, which could significantly alter their function. Most other suggested mechanisms also rely on the presence of cysts.

 

Research on Toxoplasma has mainly used the North American Type II strain. Wendy Ingram, a molecular cell biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and her colleagues investigated the effects of two other major strains, Type I and Type III, on mouse behavior. They found that within three weeks of infection with either strain, mice lost all fear of cat odor — showing that the behavioral shift is a general trait of Toxoplasma.

 

More surprising was the situation four months after infection. The Type I pathogen that the researchers used had been genetically modified to provoke an effective immune response, allowing the mice to overcome the infection. After four months, it was undetectable in the mouse brain, indicating that no more than 200 parasite cells remained. “We actually expected that Type I wouldn’t be able to form cysts, and therefore wouldn’t be able to cause the behavioral change,” explains Ingram.

 

But that was not the case: the mice remained as unperturbed by cat odour as they had been at three weeks. “Long after we lose the ability to see it in the brain, we still see its behavioral effect,” says geneticist Michael Eisen, also at Berkeley.

 

This suggests that the behavioral change could be due to a specific, hard-wired alteration in brain structure, which is generated before cysts form and cannot be reversed. The finding casts doubt on theories that cysts or dopamine cause the behavioral changes of Toxoplasma infections.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Becky Raines's comment, October 1, 2013 3:47 PM
That is so adorable. I was hoping that one day mice would stop being afraid and be sort of like friends, but that does mean that the cat has to agree as well. Cats like to chase mice so unless the cat agrees then it won't work out for either one animal.
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Supporting collaborative inquiry during a biology field trip with mobile peer-to-peer tools for learning: a case study with K-12 learners

Supporting collaborative inquiry during a biology field trip with mobile peer-to-peer tools for learning: a case study with K-12 learners | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it
(2012). Supporting collaborative inquiry during a biology field trip with mobile peer-to-peer tools for learning: a case study with K-12 learners. Interactive Learning Environments: Vol. 20, No. 2, pp.
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this study explores how collaborative inquiry learning can be supported with multiple scaffolding agents in a real-life field trip context. In practice, a mobile peer-to-peer messaging tool provided meta-cognitive and procedural support, while tutors and a nature guide provided more dynamic scaffolding in order to support argumentative discussions between groups of students during the co-creation of knowledge claims. The aim of the analysis was to identify and compare top- and low-performing dyads/triads in order to reveal the differences regarding their co-construction of arguments while creating knowledge claims. Although the results revealed several shortcomings in the types of argumentation, it could be established that differences between the top performers and low performers were statistically significant in terms of social modes of argumentation, the use of warrants in the mobile tool and in overall participation. In general, the use of the mobile tool likely promoted important interaction during inquiry learning, but led to superficial epistemological quality in the knowledge claim messages.

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Does social software fit for all? examining students' profiles and activities in collaborative learning mediated by social software

Does social software fit for all? examining students' profiles and activities in collaborative learning mediated by social software | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it
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Social patterns in mobile technology mediated collaboration among members of the professional distance education community

Social patterns in mobile technology mediated collaboration among members of the professional distance education community | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it
(2008). Social patterns in mobile technology mediated collaboration among members of the professional distance education community. Educational Media International: Vol. 45, No. 1, pp. 17-32.
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The aim of this study was to identify social patterns in mobile technology mediated collaboration among distributed members of the professional distance education community. Ten participants worked for 12 weeks designing a master’s programme in information sciences. The participants’ mobile technology usage activity and interview data were first analyzed to get an overview of the density and distribution of collaboration at individual and community levels. Second, the results of the social network analyses were interpreted to explore how different social network patterns of relationships affect online and offline interactions. Third, qualitative descriptions of participant teamwork were analyzed to provide practical examples and explanations. Overall, the analyses revealed nonparticipative behaviour within the online community. The social network analysis revealed structural holes and sparse collaboration among participants in the offline community. It was found that due to their separated practices in the offline community, they did not have a need for mobile collaboration tools in their practises

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Piilotteli konkurssissa omaisuuttaan verottajalta - yli kaksi vuotta vankeutta

Piilotteli konkurssissa omaisuuttaan verottajalta  - yli kaksi vuotta vankeutta | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it
Mies siirsi muun muassa 340 000 euron arvoiseksi lasketun tontin rakennuksineen, veneensä ja Mersunsa muiden nimiin..
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ICLS 2012 Sydney - Keynote 4 :: Pierre Dillenbourg

Pierre's keynote takes place in the Eastern Avenue Auditorium (EA AUD) from 8.30am -- 10.00am. Classroom orchestration: interweaving digital and physical wor...
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Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices

Scaffolding learning activities with collaborative scripts and mobile devices | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it

Academic dissertation to be presented with the assent of the Doctoral Training Committee of Human Sciences of the University of Oulu for public defence in Kaljusensali (Auditorium KTK 112), Linnanmaa, on 12 October 2012, at 12 noon

Jari Laru's insight:

The use of mobile devices, including mobile phones and tablets, is a growing trend in education. The practice has been widely technology driven and often justified simply by the importance of using new technology in a classroom and by claiming such devices to be important in reaching something referred to, although not that well defined, as 21st century skills. This thesis is one answer to the challenge represented by this development. It brings together theoretical ideas of scaffolding learning with collaborative scripts and the use of mobile devices as cognitive tools in a real life educational settings.

This thesis has constructivist grounds and aims at exploring how to support collaborative learning when students have ill-structured problems and their activities are supported with mobile technologies. The study consists of three case studies, which together form an example of how important it is to design, develop and deliver lightweight digital tools and activities for learners to construct knowledge.

Overall, the results of three case studies in this thesis confirms that it is a dubious assumption that learners will automatically take appropriate and measured advantage of the affordances of mobile devices and other emergent technologies involved in cognitive activities: rather, these cognitive tools require deliberate attention and effort from learners to make use of the affordances of the tools. Furthermore, results from the case studies reveal that personal factors such as students’ prior knowledge and their metacognitive and collaborative skills, as well as contextual cues such as cultural compatibility and instructional methods, influence student engagement.

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niftyjock's curator insight, December 9, 2013 4:27 PM

Fantatsic study, well researched and engaging text, 

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ScienceDirect.com - The Internet and Higher Education - Supporting small-group learning using multiple Web 2.0 tools: A case study in the higher education context

ScienceDirect.com - The Internet and Higher Education - Supporting small-group learning using multiple Web 2.0 tools: A case study in the higher education context | Papers & presentations ["mobile learning", web2.0, computer supported collaborative learning etc.] | Scoop.it
Jari Laru's insight:

In this single-case study, small groups of learners were supported by use of multiple social software tools and face-to-face activities in the context of higher education. The aim of the study was to explore how designed learning activities contribute to students' learning outcomes by studying probabilistic dependencies between the variables. Explorative Bayesian classification analysis revealed that the best predictors of good learning outcomes were wiki-related activities. According to the Bayesian dependency model, students who were active in conceptualizing issues by taking photos were also active blog reflectors and collaborative knowledge builders in their group. In general, the results indicated that interaction between individual and collective actions likely increased individual knowledge acquisition during the course.

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