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Will different OTU delineation methods change interpretation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community patterns? - Lekberg - 2014 - New Phytologist - Wiley Online Library

Will different OTU delineation methods change interpretation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community patterns? - Lekberg - 2014 - New Phytologist - Wiley Online Library | Papers | Scoop.it
Will different OTU delineation methods change interpretation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community patterns? http://t.co/oDQoqUd2JD
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Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on growth and reproductive response of plants under water deficit: a meta-analysis

Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on growth and reproductive response of plants under water deficit: a meta-analysis | Papers | Scoop.it
Despite a large body of literature that describes the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on plant response to water deficit, reviews of these works have been mainly in narrative form, and it is therefore difficult to quantify the magnitude of the effect. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the effect of mycorrhizal colonization on growth and yield of plants exposed to water deficit stress. Data were compared in the context of annual vs. perennial plants, herbaceous vs. woody plants, field vs. greenhouse conditions, degree of stress, functional group, regions of plant growth, and mycorrhizal and host species. We found that, in terms of biomass measurements, mycorrhizal plants have better growth and reproductive response under water stress compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. When variables such as habit, life cycle, or water stress level are considered, differences in mycorrhizal effect on plant growth between variables are observed. While growth of both annual and perennial plants is improved by symbiosis, perennials respond more favorably to colonization than annuals. Overall, our meta-analysis reveals a quantifiable corroboration of the commonly held view that, under water-deficit conditions, plants colonized by mycorrhizal fungi have better growth and reproductive response than those that are not.
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Meta-Analysis of Interactions between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Biotic Stressors of Plants

Meta-Analysis of Interactions between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Biotic Stressors of Plants | Papers | Scoop.it
“ Naturally, simultaneous interactions occurred among plants, herbivores, and soil biota, that is, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), nematodes, and fungal pathogens. These multiple interactions play fundamental roles in driving process, structure, and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis with 144 papers to investigate the interactions between AMF and plant biotic stressors and their effects on plant growth performance. We found that AMF enhanced plant tolerance to herbivores, nematodes, and fungal pathogens. We also found reciprocal inhibition between AMF and nematodes as well as fungal pathogens, but unidirectional inhibition for AMF on herbivores. Negative effects of AMF on biotic stressors of plants depended on herbivore feeding sites and actioning modes of fungal pathogens. More performance was reduced in root-feeding than in shoot-feeding herbivores and in rotting- than in wilt-fungal pathogens. However, no difference was found for AMF negative effects between migratory and sedentary nematodes. In return, nematodes and fungal pathogens generated more reduction of root colonization in Non-Glomeraceae than in Glomeraceae. Our results suggested that AMF positive effects on plants might be indirectly mediated by competitive inhibition with biotic stressors of plants. These positive and negative interactions make potential contributions to maintaining ecosystem stability and functioning.”
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Soil Microbes Alter DNA in Response to Climate Change | EcoWatch

Soil Microbes Alter DNA in Response to Climate Change | EcoWatch | Papers | Scoop.it
A 10-year study of soil ecosystems has determined that microbes alter their genetic code in response to a warming climate so they can process excess carbon being absorbed by plants from the atmosphere, a team of U.S. ...
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Soil fungi can save money and phosphorus runoff - Corn and Soybean Digest

Soil fungi can save money and phosphorus runoff - Corn and Soybean Digest | Papers | Scoop.it
Corn and Soybean Digest Soil fungi can save money and phosphorus runoff Corn and Soybean Digest Research by USDA – ARS soil microbiologists Mike Lehman and Wendy Taheri sheds new light on phosphorus/fungi interactions.
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Nature : Mycorrhiza-mediated competition between plants and decomposers drives soil carbon storage

Nature : Mycorrhiza-mediated competition between plants and decomposers drives soil carbon storage | Papers | Scoop.it
ABSTRACT: Soil contains more carbon than the atmosphere and vegetation combined1. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the accumulation and stability of soil carbon is critical to predicting the Earth’s future climate2, 3. Recent studies suggest that decomposition of soil organic matter is often limited by nitrogen availability to microbes4, 5, 6 and that plants, via their fungal symbionts, compete directly with free-living decomposers for nitrogen6, 7. Ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal (EEM) fungi produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes, allowing them greater access to organic nitrogen sources than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi8, 9, 10. This leads to the theoretical prediction that soil carbon storage is greater in ecosystems dominated by EEM fungi than in those dominated by AM fungi11. Using global data sets, we show that soil in ecosystems dominated by EEM-associated plants contains 70% more carbon per unit nitrogen than soil in ecosystems dominated by AM-associated plants. The effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon is independent of, and of far larger consequence than, the effects of net primary production, temperature, precipitation and soil clay content. Hence the effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon content holds at the global scale. This finding links the functional traits of mycorrhizal fungi to carbon storage at ecosystem-to-global scales, suggesting that plant–decomposer competition for nutrients exerts a fundamental control over the terrestrial carbon cycle.
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Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on growth and reproductive response of plants under water deficit: a meta-analysis

Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on growth and reproductive response of plants under water deficit: a meta-analysis | Papers | Scoop.it
Despite a large body of literature that describes the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on plant response to water deficit, reviews of these works have been mainly in narrative form, and it is therefore difficult to quantify the magnitude of the effect. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the effect of mycorrhizal colonization on growth and yield of plants exposed to water deficit stress. Data were compared in the context of annual vs. perennial plants, herbaceous vs. woody plants, field vs. greenhouse conditions, degree of stress, functional group, regions of plant growth, and mycorrhizal and host species. We found that, in terms of biomass measurements, mycorrhizal plants have better growth and reproductive response under water stress compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. When variables such as habit, life cycle, or water stress level are considered, differences in mycorrhizal effect on plant growth between variables are observed. While growth of both annual and perennial plants is improved by symbiosis, perennials respond more favorably to colonization than annuals. Overall, our meta-analysis reveals a quantifiable corroboration of the commonly held view that, under water-deficit conditions, plants colonized by mycorrhizal fungi have better growth and reproductive response than those that are not.
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