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The Increasing Role Of Smartphones In Digital Health

The Increasing Role Of Smartphones In Digital Health | palliative | Scoop.it
A Juniper Research report argues new smartphone interfaces are going to be instrumental to the future of mHealth. By Christine Kern, contributing...

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Digital medicine? High-tech health care on the way

Digital medicine? High-tech health care on the way | palliative | Scoop.it

Disruption in health care seems to have been a long time coming. From month-long wait times to preventable diseases; from inefficient IT systems to complicated medicines, the sector is now innovating, fast.


That's according to both clinicians and start-up founders at TechCrunch Disrupt in London, who argue that so-called healthtech is about to shake up the sector, making things better for both patients and doctors.


One obvious opportunity for the sector is the U.K.'s National Health Service (NHS), which is facing a funding gap of £30 billion ($48.4 billion) a year by 2021, according to the Nuffield Trust and NHS England.

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David Bennett's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:17 AM

A very interesting look at how ‘digital health’ could shape the future of healthcare delivery. The idea that patients’ increasing use of mobile phone and tablet devices will help to one day make healthcare delivery more cost effective is crucial. How will pharma have to keep up with the ever changing technology?

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The Compelling Case for Doctors to Warmly Embrace Social Media

The Compelling Case for Doctors to Warmly Embrace Social Media | palliative | Scoop.it

Most doctors recognize that healthcare’s “starting line” moved some time ago.

The typical care continuum now begins online, long before the first medical office appointment or doctor-patient face-to-face encounter. Among the chief propellants of this digital shift are the:

Mainstream proliferation of rapid Internet access;Wide adoption of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets;Instant online availability of health and medical information;Strong public popularity of major social media sites;Empowerment of the informed patient/consumer; andIncreasing emphasis on wellness, prevention and healthy living.

The Internet-related communications channels have become, for most medical practices, a primary means to reach, engage and attract new patients. In short, a doctor’s marketing and new business development efforts will be most productive when “fishing where the fish are biting.”




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Drugs and Bugs at the End of Life - Geripal

Drugs and Bugs at the End of Life - Geripal | palliative | Scoop.it
Geripal Drugs and Bugs at the End of Life Geripal The potential benefits are discussed, as well as potential next steps including the need to merge “best practices and research initiatives from both infectious diseases and palliative care,” which...
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MPs: 'Parliament must invest in good palliative care' - The Christian Institute

MPs: 'Parliament must invest in good palliative care' - The Christian Institute | palliative | Scoop.it
A cross-party group of MPs has urged Parliament to invest in palliative care, after the resounding defeat of an attempt to introduce assisted suicide earlier this month.
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Facing the challenges of palliative care: evolution - OUPblog (blog)

Facing the challenges of palliative care: evolution - OUPblog (blog) | palliative | Scoop.it
The last two decades have witnessed truly remarkable growth in the field of palliative care. Such growth is challenging, and brings both uncertainties and optimism about the future.
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Lessons on End-of-Life Care From a Sister’s Death

Lessons on End-of-Life Care From a Sister’s Death | palliative | Scoop.it
The New Old Age has often discussed end-of-life care. Such considerations recently turned from journalistic to intensely personal.
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NHS misses a year of cancer targets

NHS misses a year of cancer targets | palliative | Scoop.it
The NHS in England has repeatedly missed a key target for rapidly treating cancer patients, official figures for 2014 show.

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In palliative care, these 10 factors matter most - Futurity: Research News

In palliative care, these 10 factors matter most - Futurity: Research News | palliative | Scoop.it
Patients with serious illnesses are less likely to experience physical and emotional suffering if they receive palliative care that meets 10 key indicators.

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When a heart life-saver can become a curse: Tiny defibrillator implants keep thousands alive but can also lead to a drawn-out and distressing death

When a heart life-saver can become a curse: Tiny defibrillator implants keep thousands alive but can also lead to a drawn-out and distressing death | palliative | Scoop.it
Fred Emery thought having a defibrillator would help. But his condition deteriorated and doctors suggested that it was time to turn off this life-line.
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Managing Social Media Risks in Healthcare

Managing Social Media Risks in Healthcare | palliative | Scoop.it

The staggering statistics on the use of social media should come as a surprise to no one. According to 2014 numbers, 74% of adults with online access use social networking sites. For Internet users between ages 18 and 29, that figure is over 90%. Facebook alone has 1.32 billion active users.


For businesses, social media presents a multitude of both opportunities and challenges. Businesses in every industry have leaned on these online platforms to reach potential customers and build brand awareness in whole new ways, but at the same time these tools have raised consumers’ expectations of online availability and have run into employee use issues.


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8 Essential Social Media Tools Doctors Should Be Using Right Now

8 Essential Social Media Tools Doctors Should Be Using Right Now | palliative | Scoop.it

1. LinkedIn

Doctors should not limit their LinkedIn interaction to only building their professional contacts list. Instead, doctors can create a company page that reflects their practice and opens another line of communication for patients.


2. Facebook

Facebook is a giant in the social media realm, and for good reason. The site offers a simple platform that that can be used to share patient testimonials, reminders or any public information. By consistently sharing on the site, doctors can keep their name and practice on the forefront of their patients minds, all while increasing their exposure to potential patients.


3. YP

The Yellow Pages no longer arrive in book form through the mail carrier service. Instead, the brand has reinvented itself into an online search engine for businesses. Doctors should take advantage of this and list their practice in the catalog. This is also a tool that does not need to be used extensively, instead doctors can set a plan to check their profile once every month and make note of any reviews left.


4. Yelp

Similar to YP in that it hosts business profiles, Yelp varies in that it is used heavily by individuals looking to read reviews and ratings on a particular restaurant, cab service or doctor’s office. Doctors should make a profile and monitor reviews posted on Yelp more consistently (as they are updated more frequently than other rating sites). If doctors happen to find a negative review, they can amend their practice to improve or respond to the patient directly online to resolve the issue.


5. Twitter

This is a tool that can be used depending on the doctor. Much more personal than Facebook, Twitter allows a doctor to share his/her personality in a professional setting. Some ideas to tweet about could include medical term definitions, health-related quotes or breaking news in the health care industry.


6. YouTube

Just as individuals share videos with friends through YouTube, physicians and other health care professionals can share brief, medically-focused videos to inform patients.


7. Angie’s List

While Yelp and YP are open to the public, Angie’s List is a subscription-based site which offers reviews that hold a little more weight than those posted on free sites. Creating a profile is free, which means doctors should take advantage of this and increase their exposure. 


8. Google+

Google+ has been overlooked by most due to its slow integration into the public’s social circle. However, due to Google’s recent jump into the world of telemedicine, doctors should build a presence on the site now more than ever.


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Tiziano Galli's curator insight, May 3, 2015 8:42 AM
Il mix di strumenti si adatta meglio al mercato US ma 1,2,5,6 e 8 vanno bene anche per noi e vari altri strumenti potrebbero sostituire o aggiungersi a quelli qui riportati. Ne faccio un elenco e ne paarlo nel mio libro... Medici pazienti e Social Media...
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Learning by listening: Physicians say online reviews can improve health care

Learning by listening: Physicians say online reviews can improve health care | palliative | Scoop.it

Online platforms that allow users to read and write reviews of businesses and services afford health care providers an opportunity to learn by listening, Penn Medicine physicians say in a new Viewpoint published today in JAMA. The authors point to a growing body of literature supporting the value of unstructured reviews in supplementing ratings from formal sources such as the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Heathcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). They call on hospital leaders to pay attention to online reviews to show current and prospective patients that they are being heard.

"Reviews posted to sites like Yelp or TripAdvisor are the modern day version of word-of-mouth testimonials, providing insight into millions of consumer experiences that are not only influential to other consumers, but can and should be influential to service providers," said lead author Raina M. Merchant, MD, MSHP, an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of Penn's Social Media and Health Innovation Lab. "It's understandable that in a high-stakes setting like health care, providers may be concerned about these reviews not accurately describing parts of care visible or only understood by other care professionals. But, while we cannot control how these platforms operate, what we can do is take stock of what the reviewers are saying and find ways to make them feel like their concerns or questions are heard."

Each month, more than 80 million users read and write reviews on Yelp alone. Of those, roughly 42,000 describe U.S. hospital experiences, with most comments addressing "patient experience" issues such as parking, the cafeteria, wait times, and navigating the facility. But, results of a recent study of more than 16,000 Yelp reviews about U.S. hospitals showed that many of these services, which are areas of key importance for patients and guests, are not captured by standardized quality surveys like HCAHPS. That survey measures impressions of 11 different domains, including discharge information and the overall hospital environment. The researchers say the content contained in Yelp comments could be organized into an additional 12 areas, including amenities, compassion of staff, and family member care, an area which the authors say addresses an influential group often overlooked by service providers: family and friends.

"Most organized approaches to evaluating care focus specifically on the patient, but many online reviews seem to include either input from or focus on caregivers, friends, family and others who are often bypassed by formalized surveys," said David A. Asch, MD, MBA, a professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics and Health Policy and director of the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation. "Family members and friends are powerful advocates for vulnerable patients and also experience health services and shape patient perceptions of it. Incorporating these insights from reviews on Yelp and other consumer review platforms can be a powerful differentiator for a business."

While health professionals look for ways to use online platforms to deliver messages to patients, the authors say it's crucial to recognize that the internet is a two-way street, where patients are also sharing important ideas.


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Ad campaign highlights role of palliative care nurses at night - Nursing Times

Ad campaign highlights role of palliative care nurses at night - Nursing Times | palliative | Scoop.it
Charity Marie Curie has launched a new TV and radio advertising campaign to highlight the care and support that its nurses provide through the night to people living with a terminal illness.
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Body farm donors go public on their decisions to donate corpses

Body farm donors go public on their decisions to donate corpses | palliative | Scoop.it
Dr David von Reyk has always been an "eager and willing human guinea pig" for his colleague's experiments. Now he's taking the ultimate step.
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End of Life Cartoons? | Hospice Action Network

End of Life Cartoons? | Hospice Action Network | palliative | Scoop.it
RT @HospiceAction: Draw a cartoon about a parent's death? @Jackohman did & it's beautiful http://t.co/1CFyVYoq5U #hpm #hospice #eol http://…
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Medical Futility Blog: The Good Man, Death, and the Doctor [EOL in Art 27]

Medical Futility Blog: The Good Man, Death, and the Doctor [EOL in Art 27] | palliative | Scoop.it
The Good Man, Death, and the Doctor [EOL in Art 27]: "The Good Man, Death, and the Doctor" is an 1814 engravi... http://t.co/Z8sGTXWDab
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Medics must realise that death is an inevitable part of life, not a failure

Medics must realise that death is an inevitable part of life, not a failure | palliative | Scoop.it
Healthcare professionals should not shy away from discussing dying; good care for all at the end of life should be the norm
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Medical Futility Blog: Louise Vernet on Her Death Bed [EOL in Art 15]

Medical Futility Blog: Louise Vernet on Her Death Bed [EOL in Art 15] | palliative | Scoop.it
Louise Vernet on Her Death Bed [EOL in Art 15]: Paul Delaroche created a convincing and transcendent image of... http://t.co/5RWUBYnwU3
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Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study ... - Forbes

Hospice Care Decreases Depression Symptoms In Surviving Spouses, Study ... - Forbes | palliative | Scoop.it
Patients being placed in hospice care aren't the only ones eligible to receive services.
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NHS should stop buying drugs which cost more than £13,000, researchers say - Telegraph

NHS should stop buying drugs which cost more than £13,000, researchers say  - Telegraph | palliative | Scoop.it
Academics say the NHS should stop funding for drugs which cost more than £13,000 a year, following controversial research which watchdogs say would 'close the door' on the majority of new treatments

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End of Life and palliative care: Thinking about the words we use - YouTube

Messages for practice 1. When speaking to a person who is dying or their relatives, understand the impact of the terms used 2. Where possible, try to explain...

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