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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from The Jazz of Innovation
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Do Innovations destroy or expand the market?

Do Innovations destroy or expand the market? | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it

Apparently Socrates in ancient Greece was strongly opposed to the new practice of writing.  He thought that it would kill the long-established skill of memorizing and reciting long stories.  Furthermore he thought that writing would replace or discourage conversation.  It seems ludicrous that any intellectual could oppose writing.  However, every innovation involves an element of destruction.  Often that destruction is of a popular practice or method.  But in general, the net effect of innovation is to grow the whole sector.  In the case of writing it dramatically improved the field of communication,  For sure recitation diminished (though it survived) but writing transformed mankind’s ability to store and transfer knowledge.


Via Peter Verschuere
Joel Mondragon's insight:

I thought it was interesting to see how Socrates opposed written language although he is one of the most renown philophers in ancient history. Even in the modern world you can see similar concepts and ideas Socrates had taken into consideration hundreds of years ago.  

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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from The Jazz of Innovation
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Do Innovations destroy or expand the market?

Do Innovations destroy or expand the market? | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it

Apparently Socrates in ancient Greece was strongly opposed to the new practice of writing.  He thought that it would kill the long-established skill of memorizing and reciting long stories.  Furthermore he thought that writing would replace or discourage conversation.  It seems ludicrous that any intellectual could oppose writing.  However, every innovation involves an element of destruction.  Often that destruction is of a popular practice or method.  But in general, the net effect of innovation is to grow the whole sector.  In the case of writing it dramatically improved the field of communication,  For sure recitation diminished (though it survived) but writing transformed mankind’s ability to store and transfer knowledge.


Via Peter Verschuere
Joel Mondragon's insight:

I thought it was interesting to see how Socrates opposed written language although he is one of the most renown philophers in ancient history. Even in the modern world you can see similar concepts and ideas Socrates had taken into consideration hundreds of years ago.  

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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Conformable Contacts
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Earthquake destroyed ancient Greece?

Earthquake destroyed ancient Greece? | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it

An earthquake may have led to the collapse of the first Greeks - the Mycenaens - who inspired the legends of the Trojan Wars, 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey,' a new study has found.

The abrupt decline of the Mycenaens around 1200 BC, marking the start of a Dark Ages in Greece, is a Mediterranean mystery.

Warfare with invaders or uprising by lower classes form some leading explanations behind their collapse, 'Our Amazing Planet' reported.

Some scientists also believe one of the country's frequent earthquakes could have contributed to the culture's collapse.

Now, geologists hope to find evidence to confirm whether an earthquake was a likely culprit, at the ruins of Tiryns, a fortified palace.


Via YEC Geo
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article speculates that perhaps an earthquake led to the downfall of the Mycenaean era. They are now trying to figure out if frequent earthquake activity was responsible for the beginning of the dark age of Greece by doing tests on the collapsed walls found at the sites. 

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Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 21, 2014 4:37 PM

This site lays the blame on an earthquake for the fall of the Myceaean civilization.

Chase Lee's curator insight, February 22, 2014 1:29 AM

So they are suggesting that Greece was subject to many earthquakes which led to the decline of greek society. Im not too sure about this. It doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense. It seems to me that if the Parthenon could stay standing for the last 2500 years then it probably wasn't that big of an issue.

Kelcey Hein's curator insight, May 3, 2014 2:38 AM

This covers a possible natural disaster that could have collapsed the Mycenaen Civilizations

Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Ancient History
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the Earliest Chinese Writing | Ancient Chinese Culture

the Earliest Chinese Writing | Ancient Chinese Culture | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
The earliest Chinese writing appeared during the Shang Dynasty (1766 B.C - 1050 B.C.) and the earliest form is called the oracle bone script.

Via Mick, Jessica Magana
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article describes some of the earliest writing in ancient china. It explains how the Shang dynasty was the first to create this written language. The language was called oracle bone script because it was carved from a heated rod into things like turtle shells. 

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:18 AM

In this article,  says the shang dynasty was appeared to be the first writing in the Ancient China.

Keith Mielke's curator insight, February 14, 2014 2:09 PM

As discussed in class bone script was the most common form of writing due to the availability of bones and most of all how common the reading of broken bones to tell the future was. 

Carlee Allen's curator insight, May 17, 10:58 AM

This article talks about the ancient origin of the Chinese language. It was invented by a man who was related to the Yellow Emperor. It also talked about how there was sometimes the same signs for different words, and how the same words even had different sign sometimes. The first Chinese handwriting appeared during the Shang Dynasty.

 

I thought that it was interesting to see the origins of the Chinese language, especially since I have always been fascinated with China and their culture.

Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Early Humans
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Chinese scientists identify largest neolithic city- China.org.cn

Chinese scientists identify largest neolithic city- China.org.cn | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it

Chinese scientists identify largest neolithic city http://t.co/YRLo9MGk...


Via Patti McNamara
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This page illustrates what seems to be the largest city found from Neolithic ancient china. The city was constructed of stone which contained inner and outer building structures. Aside from stone structures archeologists also found carved jade and what seems to be the first mural of this period in china.

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Andreina Ruiz's curator insight, February 19, 2014 2:22 AM

It is amazing how archaeologists were able to find the largest city in neolithic China located in northwest China's Shaanxi Province. It is considered to be 4,000-year-old Shimao Ruins.

Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Ancient Origins of Science
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Neolithic cave dwelling found in NW China- China.org.cn

#China Neolithic cave dwelling found in NW China http://t.co/f8tWd3UjIo

Via Ruby Carat
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article was very interesting, because it describes an archeological discovery from ancient Neolithic China. The site was significant because it contained intact artifacts including houses from that time period. Various types of pottery and ceramics were also found with distinctive patterns.  

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 25, 2013 10:07 PM
wish it gave more information without me having to click it but its interesting
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Archaeology in Europe News: 07/01/2013 - 08/01/2013

Archaeology in Europe News: 07/01/2013 - 08/01/2013 | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
However, based on the length of theNeolithic-era barrows beneath each of the buildings, the researchers estimate the halls to have been 100 and 230 feet long, respectively. The team also believes the .....
Joel Mondragon's insight:

I enjoyed reading the article becuase it talks about the discovery of built shleters that may be 4000 b.C. years old. Furthermore it leave you with a question in your head as to why they burned down the structure after they were built. 

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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Ancient Origins of Science
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Generational Wealth: Hesiod versus Aristotle | Isaac M. Morehouse

Generational Wealth: Hesiod versus Aristotle | Isaac M. Morehouse | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
The ancient poet wrote at a time near the end of the Greek Dark Ages and at the beginning of the Archaic period. Greece was a highly decentralized region made up of mostly small, self-governing societies, and the merchant ...

Via Ruby Carat
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article talks about a common man during the end of the Dark Age in Greece and the beginning of the Arcadian period. It reflects on what life was like during this specific time in history. 

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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Ancient Origins of Science
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Linguistics Baking Part III: Phoenician | res gerendae

Linguistics Baking Part III: Phoenician | res gerendae | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
... colonised by Phoenicians: Carthage, of course, is the best-known Phoenician foundation, but they also settled in other areas of Northern Africa, the Iberian Peninsula, Sardinia, and Cyprus; in the western Mediterranean Phoenician, ...

Via Ruby Carat
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article explains the origin of the Phoenician language where it was believed to have originated. It also talks about the type of language it was and who were some of the people that adopted it. For example most famously known it was the basis for Greek language. 

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Andreina Ruiz's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:54 PM

Phoenicians is a language that was originally spoken in the southern Levant. The script was the basis for the Greek alphabet. It was not just an alphabet, but a script that represents consonants but not vowels.

JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 26, 2014 10:18 PM

A course on phoenicians baking during the ancient era. 

Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Ancient Origins of Science
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Dongba culture linked to Neolithic cave paintings - Mongols China ...

Dongba culture linked to Neolithic cave paintings - Mongols China ... | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
Academics from Britain and China claim to have found links between Neolithic cave paintings and the Dongba religion of Yunnan Province. The latest research establishes a pattern that reveals the origins of Dongba writings ...

Via Ruby Carat
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article makes a direct link between Dongba culture and cave paintings form Neolithic China. Even today this culture still uses this form of written language using pictures to explain different concepts. The findings of these pictographs suggest that they were used by higher ranked individuals thousands of years ago. It’s interesting to see how influential artifacts might be in discovering direct connections from our history to present day civilizations. 

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Rescooped by Joel Mondragon from Cultural Worldviews
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Site provides clearer picture of China's ancient past

Site provides clearer picture of China's ancient past | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
New archaeological discoveries in Yuyao city, in eastern China's Zhejiang province, provide a clearer picture of life in China's Neolithic age and confirm that the nation originated the practice of paddy cultivation.

Via ramblejamble
Joel Mondragon's insight:

This article is important because it describes one of the most influential Neolithic sites of ancient china to the modern world. This famous site found by mistake contains clear layouts of ancient Neolithic tribes. It explains also how the civilizations cultivated patty fields. 

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The Archaeology News Network: Genetic study pushes back ...

The Archaeology News Network: Genetic study pushes back ... | paleolithic and neolithic era | Scoop.it
Indeed, the authors also demonstrate that the populations who adopted a sedentary farming lifestyle during the Neolithic had previously experienced the strongest Paleolithic expansions. Conversely ...
Joel Mondragon's insight:

The ancient world made a dramatic change when people left old customs behind and began new ways of living and expanding. During the begin of the new stone age people left nomatic lifestyles and began building permanet settlements which allowed agricultural growth. With new these methods of living the world's population skyrocketed.

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