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Food quality matters, and has serious implications for water and energy use, health effects and biodiversity. 

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Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging"

Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging" | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

Background

The impact of diet on specific age-related diseases has been studied extensively, but few investigations have adopted a more holistic approach to determine the association of diet with overall health at older ages. We examined whether diet, assessed in midlife, using dietary patterns and adherence to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), is associated with aging phenotypes, identified after a mean 16-year follow-up.

Methods

Data were drawn from the Whitehall II cohort study of 5350 adults (age 51.3±5.3 years, 29.4% women). Diet was assessed at baseline (1991-1993). Mortality, chronic diseases, and functioning were ascertained from hospital data, register linkage, and screenings every 5 years and were used to create 5 outcomes at follow-up: ideal aging (free of chronic conditions and high performance in physical, mental, and cognitive functioning tests; 4%), nonfatal cardiovascular event (7.3%), cardiovascular death (2.8%), noncardiovascular death (12.7%), and normal aging (73.2%).

Results

Low adherence to the AHEI was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular death. In addition, participants with a “Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) had lower odds of ideal aging (odds ratio for top vs bottom tertile: 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.94; P=.02), independently of other health behaviors.

Conclusions

By considering healthy aging as a composite of cardiovascular, metabolic, musculoskeletal, respiratory, mental, and cognitive function, the present study offers a new perspective on the impact of diet on aging phenotypes.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Alexis Dickerson's insight:

Standard American Diet = SAD diet.  Ancestoral health diets seek historic dietary principles with the goal of restoring/optimizing health and reducing diseases of affluence (diabesity, CHD, etc)

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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, May 16, 2013 1:02 PM

"Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) has been attributed to many disease of older age. This study characterizes ideal aging as avoidance of these disease. The additional life style strategies of exercise and smoking are strongly associated with favorable aging but diet is an independent predictor.  It makes common sense that the cumulative effect of daily diet over the middle third of life will have an impact on outcomes in the last third of life.

Cynthia Tait's comment, May 17, 2013 10:24 PM
hmmm - this sounds all to plausible - not sure I am going to share this with my parents - as this will mean they have been on the right path all their lives - searching and reading and modifying their diets to suit the long lives they wish to live. Go Mum and Dad. <yeah, I still didn't share it with them - i can hear the 'i told you so' echoes through from the future> :)
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Can too much exercise harm the heart and shorten your life?

Can too much exercise harm the heart and shorten your life? | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

Moderate joggers lived the longest during a 30-year study. The green bars show joggers who had a significantly lower risk of dying during the study compared with people who didn't exercise. The blue bars do not show statistically significant differences with non-joggers.

Until further studies can help physicians personalize their advice on exercise, researchers agree that the safest bet is to listen to your body and cut back if you experience pain or excessive fatigue between workouts. Many people check off marathons and triathlons from their bucket lists and then ease back into shorter workouts.

Resistance training with weights, balance exercises, and stretching also become more important as the body ages, to combat the loss of muscle mass, balance, and flexibility. “Optimal aging includes not just cardiovascular fitness but retention of overall muscle strength,” 


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Slow, steady frequent exercise for optimal health!

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Michael Wiener's curator insight, September 4, 2013 5:16 PM

This is very interesting as most men and women think the longer they workout, the better. It's good to know that moderate exercise can do a lot in improving health and fitness. Consuming the right types of foods at the right amount is probably the major player in maintaining ideal weight resulting to great level of physical fitness.

 

Exercising too much might not do anything good if one do not watch what he/she eats.

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Food quality matters, and has serious implications for water and energy use, health effects and biodiversity. 

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The Rise of the Minimalist Workout

The Rise of the Minimalist Workout | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

People have been trying to figure out forever what the right amount of exercise is, but the focus lately is on the shortest period possible.

In the past, formal recommendations have called for a substantial amount of regular exercise. For example, published guidelines from the Health and Human Services Department in 2008 suggested 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week — the equivalent of five 30-minute walks. The guidelines added that 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week, like jogging, could be substituted.

These guidelines were based on a large body of science showing that 150 minutes of moderate exercise was associated with a longer life span and a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, June 24, 2013 11:17 AM

Studies have shown that 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week is associated with improved longevity and reduced risk of many diseases (obesity, diabetes).
Although these shorter more intense exercises are appealing for "busy" Americans, we don't know if the same long term health effects can be expected. In addition to the shorter time required in these workouts and therefore greater likelihood of adoption by those whop are motivated, another potential benefit is that the shorter duration of pain and discomfort with exercise may be an attractive aspect to help overcome the hurdles to exercise.

Ellen Diane's comment, June 26, 2013 4:31 AM
I do intervals in my over 40 fitness class:) we do lots of cardio (cardiac:) bursts
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Health Junkie: Hormones and Chemicals Released Due to Exercise

Health Junkie: Hormones and Chemicals Released Due to Exercise | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

"Ever wonder what is going on chemically in the body while you sweat it out at the gym? The euphoric feelings during and after exercise, as well as the muscle soreness that might just come a day later, don't just appear magically. Your body is made up of millions of chemical reactions, which result in different physical and mental feelings. Take a look at some of the top hormones and chemicals that are released when you workout."


Via PAT NOVAK
Alexis Dickerson's insight:

Physical actitivity is a great way to cleanse and renew your system.  Focus on longer moderate paced movements, or physical activites like gardening for constant engagement of your muscles without overwork.  And most importantly, drink plenty of fluids to allow toxins to be flushed from the body.

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Cake mix wins top foodie awards - Whitsunday Times

Cake mix wins top foodie awards - Whitsunday Times | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it
Cake mix wins top foodie awards
Whitsunday Times
Tania Hubbard, a co-founder of The Gluten Free Grain Free Company, created the range of mixes that took first place in the health and wellness category of the awards.
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Exploding Myths about Exercise

Exploding Myths about Exercise | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

Even when you know physical activity is good for you, it's easy to keep dragging your feet—literally. We all have reasons to stay inactive, but sometimes those reasons are based more on myth than reality. Here are some of the most common myths about physical activity and ways to replace them with a more realistic, can-do spirit.

 

=> Myth 1: "Physical activity takes too much time." Physical activity does take some time, but there are ways to make it manageable. If you don't have 30 minutes in your daily schedule for an activity break, try to find three 10-minute periods. If you're aiming for 60 minutes daily—a good goal if you're trying to avoid weight gain—perhaps you can carve out some "fitness time" early in the day, before your schedule gets too busy. Another idea is to combine physical activity with a task that's already part of your daily routine, such as walking the dog or doing yard chores.

=> Myth 2: "Getting in shape makes you tired."

Once you begin regular physical activity, you're likely to have even more energy than before. As you progress, daily tasks will seem easier. Regular, moderate-to-brisk physical activity can also help you to reduce fatigue and manage stress.

=> Myth 3: "The older you are, the less physical activity you need."

Most people become less physically active as they age, but keeping fit is important throughout life. Regular physical activity increases older people's ability to perform routine daily tasks and to stay independent longer. No matter what your age, you can find a physical activity program that is tailored to your particular fitness level and needs.

=> Myth 4: "Taking medication interferes with physical activity."

In most cases, this is not true. In fact, becoming more active may lessen your need for certain medicines, such as high blood pressure drugs. However, before beginning a physical activity program, be sure to inform your doctor about both prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking, so that your health can be properly monitored.

=> Myth 5: "You have to be athletic to exercise." Most physical activities don't require any special athletic skills. In fact, many people who have bad memories of difficult school sports have discovered a whole world of enjoyable, healthful activities that involve no special talent or training. A perfect example is brisk walking—a superb, heart healthy activity. Others include bicycling, gardening, or yard work, as long as they're done at a brisk pace. Just do more of the activities you already like and already know how to do. It's that simple.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, June 16, 2013 7:58 AM

NIH publication on exercise facts and fiction. 5 myths debunked.

Angelo Santa Ana's curator insight, June 16, 2013 1:16 PM

Our bodies are built to move. Exercise promotes a longer, healthier, more vibrant life

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#OnThisDay 150 years ago: 1st presentation on low carbohydrate diet by William Banting

#OnThisDay 150 years ago: 1st presentation on low carbohydrate diet by William Banting | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it

In 1863, William Banting wrote a booklet called Letter on Corpulence, Addressed to the Public which contained the particular plan for the diet he followed. It was written in the form of an open letter in the form of a personal testimonial. Banting accounted all of his unsuccessful fasts, diets, spa and exercise regimes in his past, then described the dietary change which finally had worked for him, following the advice of a physician. His own diet was four meals per day, consisting of meat, greens, fruits, and dry wine. The emphasis was on avoiding sugar, saccharine matter, starch, beer, milk and butter. Banting’s pamphlet was popular for years to come, and would be used as a model for modern diets. Initially, he published the booklet at his personal expense. The self-published edition was so popular that he determined to sell it to the general public. The third and later editions were published (see the archived comoplete booklet at he link on teh image) The pamphlet's popularity was such that the question "do you bant?" referred to his method.

From wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Banting

 


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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, September 21, 2013 7:12 AM

As a cardiologist, practicing for 20 years I am complicit in the incorrect counsel of patients earlier in my career that was part of government and professional medical societies that recommended eating a low fat and high carbohydrate diet.  This approach has clearly contributed to the obesity and diet issues we face as a society.  The lower carbohydrate, very low sugar diet advocated first 150 years ago is "new again".  For those interested in a well done documentary on the topic, check out he documentary Perfect Human Diet at http://www.perfecthumandiet.us 

Alexis Dickerson's comment, September 22, 2013 6:39 AM
very cool document!
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Nutrition Journal | Abstract | Subjective satiety and other experiences of a Paleolithic diet compared to a diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes

Nutrition Journal | Abstract | Subjective satiety and other experiences of a Paleolithic diet compared to a diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it
We found marked improvement of glycemic control and several cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes given advice to follow a Paleolithic diet, as compared to a diabetes diet.
Alexis Dickerson's insight:

Paleo confers many health benefits, but will also decrease hunger, giving you more control over your food choices, via improved insulin sensitivity.

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Loaded Nacho Meatballs (Low Carb and Gluten Free)

Loaded Nacho Meatballs (Low Carb and Gluten Free) | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it
Meatball Mondays continues with this low carb & gluten free meatball recipe inspired by loaded nachos and topped with salsa, cheese, jalapenos & sour cream!

Via Carlos Newsome
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18 Recipes That Make The Paleo Diet Look (Almost) Easy - BuzzFeed

18 Recipes That Make The Paleo Diet Look (Almost) Easy - BuzzFeed | Paleo Primal Diet | Scoop.it
18 Recipes That Make The Paleo Diet Look (Almost) Easy
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18 Recipes That Make The Paleo Diet... is starting to get hot on Twitter Tweet It about a week ago ×; pinterest.com readers just made 18 Recipes That Make The Paleo Diet...
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Paleo is easy... see!

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