Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community
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Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community
Contributions of paid and unpaid workers and voluntary organisations in the community
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St Vincent de Paul Society Charities | Vinnies Australia

St Vincent de Paul Society Charities | Vinnies Australia | Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community | Scoop.it
Lauren Farrugia's insight:

St. Vincent De Paul Society has many prime examples that demonstrate the significant contribution volunteers have within an organization to supporting many social groups who may not have easy access to their basic needs. Initiatives that can be explored as a whole class could include Night Patrol, Winter Sleepouts and family services. An excursion to the local Vinnies store (or other second hand charity store depending on the area) could be conducted to have the children look at how these promote greater accessibility to accessing needs. 

 

Students could also be grouped and allocated a figurative budget, which they are then to write down what they could buy from the store with these financial resources. For example, the budget for one group could be $20, while another could be $40 and groups could present their ‘purchase list’ and discuss how an organization, such as Vinnies assists people within the community. Student individual reflections could conclude their experience to the store, whereby students are encouraged to express their thoughts on the contribution Vinnies makes to community life and the vital need for volunteers to assist the smooth running of services.

Donating items to such stores can also promote the idea of reusing resources rather than simply throwing them away, thus further establishing links with other key HSIE areas.

 

McDonald and Gilbert (2011) advocate the pedagogical strategy of field trips/excursions in Stage 2 learners finding out and collecting community based data, as it enables students to observe “beyond the classroom” (Gilbert, R., McDonald, H., 2011, p. 112). Additionally it reflects Newmann and Wehlage (1993, as cited by Gilbert, R., 2011 p.143) promote the concept of connectedness to the world as the key to experiential learning, as students are exploring the social issues within the community and learning how voluntary organizations are accessible (Gilbert, R., 2011, p.143). When assessing teachers use levels of the SOLO taxonomy to distinguish the levels of thinking students undertake when writing their reflections about the excursion. There are both numerical and literacy links with these learning activities, as students need to effectively budget and calculate monetary figures, as well as construct a written response that reflects their understanding of the contributions voluntary organizations, such as Vinnies, contribute to community life.

 

Gilbert., R, Hoepper., B (2011). Teaching society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

 

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Kogarah Community Services - Kogarah Community Services

Kogarah Community Services - Kogarah Community Services | Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community | Scoop.it
Lauren Farrugia's insight:

This website is a great example of a local community organization that has both paid and unpaid workers who provide varying services to meet the needs of all different groups of people within the community; as there are English as a second language, aged care and children services. Children and teachers can explore this website to become aware that people within their own community have access to obtaining their rights through such a service, and that there is assistance within the community for everyone; families, aged people and children. A guest speaker could visit the students (paid or unpaid) and describe their work, and what kind of work others perform.

Furthermore they could pose the question to the students; how would the community be affected if there were no workers in this service to assist others, both paid and unpaid? A brainstorm could then be followed. Prior to the visit, write a KWL chart and have groups prepare some interview questions. After the talk they can fill out the learnt column and in groups look at how this service meets the needs and allows for greater access to the rights of the community, and helps to enhance community and school life (as this particular service assists schools with before and after school care program). Gilbert, R. heightens the importance of connectedness as a “key element of authentic pedagogy” (Gilbert, R, 2011, p. 144), and this website provides an example of this on a local scale, while also encouraging students to develop a sense of contributing to their community, as this leads to acceptance of diversity (Gilbert, R., 2011).

 

Assessment strategy for teachers could include recording observations of group discussions and establishing criteria for the students to meet that shows they have demonstrated an understanding of the service, what they do and apply this information to critically thinking how this addresses the needs and rights of individuals within the community. There are profound literacy links through comprehending information to establish the links between the service and its ability to meet the needs of people.  

 

Gilbert., R, Hoepper., B (2011). Teaching society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

 

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Behind the News - 24/06/2008: Strikes

Behind the News - 24/06/2008: Strikes | Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community | Scoop.it
This year lots of Aussie school kids have scored an extra day off No theyre not wagging Its because of teachers strikes Theyve gone on strike because they reckon they should get paid more for
Lauren Farrugia's insight:

This video about the teacher strike is an advantageous example for students to develop awareness about the importance of having paid workers in society. For example, if there were no teachers, how would students access education? It also establishes a link with the rights and responsibilities of paid workers, what they are entitled to as a worker and how policies and laws are in place to ensure their fairness and safety is met. This also presents the ideas of a ‘chain reaction’, as teachers were unable to work, neither were some parents, as they had to look after their children. This could be followed with a teacher lead class discussion about the different types of paid workers in the community, for example, if doctors were to go on strike, would there be need for a hospital? What would happen to people in need of medical attention? This explores how society would be affected if they were to stop working, thus showing how they contribute to a developed community.

 

Together the class could construct a ‘chain reaction’ that displays the impact this would have on other members of the community. Additionally this could be role played where students act out the roles of the individuals in the chain reactions that are created and assessed through observation and the extent of participation. This compliments Gilbert R. ideas on active and experiential learning, particularly connectedness to the world, as students use the teacher strike example from the video to apply their knowledge of how workers contribute to society in real life contexts. Furthermore, the teaching activity reflects substantive conversation that allows students to interact about ideas on this topic and share ideas. This will lead to further discussion and raised questions that can build to “promote improved collective understanding of a theme or topic.” (Gilbert, R., 2011, p. 143) Provides students the opportunity to strengthen their communicative skills through oral conversation, and decoding skills as they interpret the video to assess the importance of paid workers in the community. 

 

Gilbert., R, Hoepper., B (2011). Teaching society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

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Story: Strong & Smart - Chris Sarra & Cherbourg

Story: Strong & Smart - Chris Sarra & Cherbourg | Paid and Unpaid Workers and Voluntary Organisations in the Community | Scoop.it
Story: Strong & Smart - Chris Sarra & Cherbourg
Lauren Farrugia's insight:

Everybody in Australia has the right to education. This source validates this through the story of Indigenous principal Chris Sarra, who employs initiatives to enhance the learning opportunities for Indigenous students at Cherbourg State School. This is a prime example of a paid worker having significant impact to school and community life by providing effective and quality leadership and positive attributes. A teacher can use this website to gather an understanding of Chris’ approach to enriching student learning and engagement with Indigenous students through enforcing the notion of high expectations.

 

Teachers could use this information and condense it for Stage 2 learners to comprehend and understand. In groups students could read the information about his approach, and discuss in groups how this assists in meeting the rights of Indigenous students in regards to accessing quality education, followed by a whole class discussion and brainstorm of the key initiatives and how this would enhance school/community life. Students then write individual letters to Chris Sarra about their thoughts on the initiatives he put forward and how they feel this would help better the quality of school and community life for Indigenous students, for example, by giving the students rewards they are more likely to come to school and gain access to their right to education. This learning activity requires students to develop their depth of knowledge, whereby they take the concepts from the information provided and uses them in an “active way to solve problems or construct explanations” (Gilbert, R., 2011, p. 144). Assessment strategies for teachers could include observation of group discussions about information, and the SOLO taxonomy to assess the characteristics of their letter responses (prestructural, unistructural, multistructural, relational and extended abstract) (Gilbert, R., 2011, p. 133). There are strong literacy links, as students need to take on the four key reader roles to decode the information and apply it with their knowledge on rights and how the contributions of this paid worker heightens community and school life for Indigenous students. 

 

Gilbert., R, Hoepper., B (2011). Teaching society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

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Kids Helping Kids

Tyler Page, just 10 years old inspired by an Oprah show raises $21,000 in 6 months for child trafficking (fishing slavery) and starts a non-profit company ca...
Lauren Farrugia's insight:

This clip is beneficial for students to become aware of the impact that children can have on a global level, demonstrating that adults are not the only unpaid workers in the community or establish voluntary organizations. Thus it is a valuable source to empower and inspire children to understand the difference their input can make to better the quality of lives for others. Following this video, group the students and have them create their own charity/organization that assists a particular group of people struggling on a global level. Firstly, an investigation can take place to research about issues in other countries (this may be conducted through exploration of already established organizations and who they assist) followed by a PowerPoint or video to be assembled that describes their organization, their goals and aims and what they hope to achieve, and how they will go about this.

 

McDonald and Gilbert (2011) assert the importance for effective means to capture students’ interests, through promoting creativity to stimulate their imagination and to “envisage new ways of thinking about issues or solving problems” (Gilbert, R., McDonald, H., 2010, p. 108) as reflected through this learning activity, by creatively responding to issues and attempt to solve/assist through designing their own organization. Furthermore, Winch (2010) asserts the benefits integrating ICT in writing to develop literacy skills, as students need to employ a range of media using subject-specific vocabulary to suit their intended audience (Winch, 2010, p. 400). Assessment strategies could include criteria that the students need to meet, as well as peer assessment whereby the students provide their input to the works of others. Teacher and students can perform this through observation, recording and providing feedback (Gilbert, R., 2011). Using multimedia provides solid literacy links, in addressing purpose of texts, varying ways to convey meaning, as well as exploring visuals to see how authors and creators use these to present important ideas and messages to an audience. 

 

Gilbert., R, Hoepper., B (2011). Teaching society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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