Pahndeepah Perceptions
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Why drawing needs to be a curriculum essential

Why drawing needs to be a curriculum essential | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Drawing has creative, expressive and educational value; it remains fundamental to translating and analysing the world
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Drawing has seen something of a renaissance in the last twenty years in the UK. From the Campaign for Drawing to the Drawing Research Network, from the Drawing Room to the Rabley Drawing Centre, we've witnessed a proliferation of passion, effort and energy matched by increased museum exhibitions, dedicated degree courses, professors, publications and conferences.

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The mammoth that trampled on the history of mankind

The mammoth that trampled on the history of mankind | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Next month marks 150 years since the discovery of the La Madeleine mammoth – an engraving that proves man lived alongside these prehistoric creatures. By Robin McKie
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Just a few weeks from now, scientists from across the globe will gather in the town of Les Eyzies in the Dordogne to commemorate one of the most important – and fortuitous – events in the study of human origins. They will congregate to mark the 150th anniversary of the discovery of theMadeleine mammoth, a small piece of ancient art that provided unequivocal proof of the deep antiquity of Homo sapiens.

The uncovering of the engraving, in 1864, was the handiwork of a joint British-French archaeological expedition and it provided the first, unambiguous evidence that human beings had once shared this planet with long-extinct animals such as the mammoth. Its discovery was also an act of extraordinary good fortune, it transpires.

"On the day the engraving was found, two of the world's leading palaeontologists happened to be at the site," says Jill Cook, an ice age art expert at the British Museum. "The piece had been fragmented and workmen carrying out the excavations would never have realised this. They would have simply dumped the bits into a bag and forgotten about them."

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The Collection Online | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Collection Online | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

After Wikipaintings  and GoogleArt, one of the real delights  when you want to  surf around through the greatest works of art. And the real museum ain't so bad either if you happen to be in NYC. 

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Exteriorizing the Inner Realms: Occult revelations in the art of 'Abraxas'

Exteriorizing the Inner Realms: Occult revelations in the art of 'Abraxas' | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Engage in “sensory sorcery” with Pam Grossman, New York-based associate editor for Abraxas as she takes us on a tour through five incredible esoteric art pieces.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Very intriguing conversation on esoteric and occult art with one of the editors of the journal ABRAXAS.

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New target for chronic pain treatment found | neuroscientistnews.com

New target for chronic pain treatment found | neuroscientistnews.com | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. In a paper published May 21 in the journal Neuron, a team of researchers led by Mark Zylka, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, shows that PIP5K1C controls the activity of cellular receptors that signal pain. By reducing the level of the enzyme, researchers showed that the levels of a crucial lipid called PIP2in pain-sensing neurons is also lessened, thus decreasing pain.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

New therapy for chronic pain

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When PhDs realize they won't be professors - Macleans.ca

When PhDs realize they won't be professors - Macleans.ca | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Young academics struggle with the transition from school to work
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

The Postdoc Survey, a partnership between the Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars andMitacs (an organization that coordinates industry-university research partnerships, including internships) consulted 1,830 of the estimated 9,000 Ph.D. graduates working as entry-level “postdoctoral researchers” in Canada. They found that their average age was 34 and roughly two-thirds earned less than $45,000 annually, many without benefits. Half reported no exposure to non-academic careers and 87 per cent said they either had no access to career counselling or were uncertain thereof. Nearly seven in 10 said their career goal was to become a professor—despite the odds. While large numbers agreed they wanted training in things like grant or proposal writing and project management, few were getting any. Some of their comments were revealing: one said non-academic careers were seen as “selling out or failing.”

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We Must Imagine Sisyphus Happy - Existential Comics

We Must Imagine Sisyphus Happy - Existential Comics | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Awesome!

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Here's How Netflix Is About to Change Radically

Here's How Netflix Is About to Change Radically | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Using Netflix will not always involve scrolling through endless lists of movies served up by genre or because you watched one episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer last summer. A Netflix executive says in the future, the streaming service may not throw hundreds of choices at people all at once.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Chief Product Officer Neil Hunt said Netflix was going to focus on developing more personal recommendations to help alleviate the paradox of choice users feel when trying to sift through thousands of movies and TV shows. “You won’t see a grid and you won’t see a sea of titles,” Hunt said. The company could automatically serve users three or four viewing options based on their tastes. Still, Hunt said it was “somewhat unrealistic” to believe Netflix would ever deliver a completely linear, algorithm-driven experience, the way Pandora does with music.

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Deconstructing God

Deconstructing God | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Can reading abstruse French theory lead to religious belief?
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Always a pleasure to read Jack Caputo. 


"If you cease to “believe” in a particular religious creed, like Calvinism or Catholicism, you have changed your mind and adopted a new position, for which you will require new propositions. Imagine a debate in which a theist and an atheist actually convince each other. Then they trade positions and their lives go on. But if you lose “faith,” in the sense this word is used in deconstruction, everything is lost. You have lost your faith in life, lost hope in the future, lost heart, and you cannot go on.

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The future soldier: part human, part machine

The future soldier: part human, part machine | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
The U.S. military has big plans for wearable tech in the coming years.

Via Khannea Suntzu
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

The Soldier 2.0

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Longer than a Blue Whale: 'Biggest Dinosaur ever' Discovered

Longer than a Blue Whale: 'Biggest Dinosaur ever' Discovered | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Fossilized bones of a dinosaur believed to be the largest creature ever to walk the Earth have been unearthed in Argentina, paleontologists say. Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall. Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus. Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period. A local farm worker first stumbled on the remains in the desert near La Flecha, about 250km (135 miles) west of Trelew, Patagonia. The fossils were then excavated by a team of paleontologists from the Museum of Palaeontology Egidio Feruglio, led by Dr Jose Luis Carballido and Dr Diego Pol. They unearthed the partial skeletons of seven individuals - about 150 bones in total - all in "remarkable condition".
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Salon Takes Aim at Patton Oswalt Again, Is Once Again Publicly Embarrassed

Salon Takes Aim at Patton Oswalt Again, Is Once Again Publicly Embarrassed | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
As soon as Patton Oswalt began cleverly trolling Twitter last Wednesday afternoon, it was only a matter of time before Salon had a comment about it. Turns out it took all of a few days.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

The ongoing devolution of Salon.com is Patton-ly obvious. 

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Soul Spelunker » Hermetic Intelligence

Soul Spelunker » Hermetic Intelligence | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

The primary way the soul is deepened is through imagination. When we have new ideas about something we’re thinking about metaphorically, such as how a spiral exemplifies the movement of the soul, or how snowflakes are perfect mandalas, then we are functioning in the area of Hermetic intelligence. One of the main tasks of Hermes as World Daimon is to guide the soul into a deeper experience of the world. In our day, viewing the world metaphorically and imaginatively has taken a back seat to science, engineering and technical learning. What many don’t understand is that our technical concentration of this age is yet another story of soul, and we must view it, not literally, but through the eyes of soul. Most don’t listen to the voice of Hermes. Most are not receptive to the wisdom he provides.   Everything that occurs in this world can be “seen through,” as James Hillman often said. We can view all of the wonders of Nature metaphorically. If we listen closely, Hermes will supply us with a wealth of interpretations that will lead our souls downward into, what Moore calls, “a vortex of significance.”


Via Zeteticus
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Kim Cascone's comment, May 21, 2014 3:21 PM
thanks for sharing this :) (Y)
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This Neuroscientist Exposes Every Lie You've Been Told About Drugs Since You Were a Kid

This Neuroscientist Exposes Every Lie You've Been Told About Drugs Since You Were a Kid | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

Chatting with Dr. Hart in his office at Columbia to discuss the themes presented in High Price, and the problems caused by the government's War On Drugs.

Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

"...People have these unbelievable views about drugs. We are a wealthy country, and we spend a lot of money on science to find the right answers about drugs. We have the truth, but it's not being shared because law enforcement, politicians, parents, and even scientists have an interest in keeping the public unaware. I'm trying to say, "Be prepared to let evidence dictate what you think..."

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How the visual language of comics could have its roots in the ice age

How the visual language of comics could have its roots in the ice age | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Cartoons have a sophisticated language all their own, argues psychologist and comics obsessive Neil Cohn. He breaks it down for David Robson
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The Future of Work and Death

A documentary feature concerning the future of two ‘inevitable’ parts of the human condition; WORK and DEATH.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

“The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.” - Isaac Asimov

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How the brain works during meditation | neuroscientistnews.com

How the brain works during meditation | neuroscientistnews.com | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Meditation is more than just a way to calm our thoughts and lower stress levels: our brain processes more thoughts and feelings during meditation than when you are simply relaxing, a coalition of researchers from Norway and Australia has found. Mindfulness. Zen. Acem. Meditation drumming. Chakra. Buddhist and transcendental meditation. There are countless ways of meditating, but the purpose behind them all remains basically the same: more peace, less stress, better concentration, greater self-awareness and better processing of thoughts and feelings.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Considering the impact of mindfulness

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Flies take time over tough decisions

Flies take time over tough decisions | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

After training fruit flies to avoid a new smell at a specific intensity, the researchers offered them a choice between that dangerous odour level and a weaker one. The flies did well when the safe option was four or five times weaker, but chose randomly if the difference was only 10%.

Crucially, as the differences became smaller and trickier to distinguish, the flies took more and more time to make a decision, waiting much longer in an intermediate zone between the two odour levels.

This is a pattern that psychologists have studied for many decades. "The same mathematical models that describe human decision-making also capture the flies' behaviour perfectly," Prof Miesenböck told BBC News. "That's remarkable."

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US Navy funds morality lessons for robots (Wired UK)

US Navy funds morality lessons for robots (Wired UK) | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

Scientists to explore the challenges of providing autonomous robots with a sense of right and wrong -- and the consequences of their actions


As we all learned from the 1986 film War Games, machines have the upperhand in warfare when it comes to making logical decisions (such as, the only winning move in nuclear war is not to play). But now it seems the US Navy is not content with that party trick, as it is working on teaching artificial intelligence how to make moral and ethical decisions, too.

A multidisciplinary team at Tufts and Brown Universities, along with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been funded by the Office of Naval Research to explore the challenges of providing autonomous robots with a sense of right and wrong -- and the consequences of their actions. Matthias Scheutz, principal investigator on the project, and director of the Human-Robot Interaction lab at Tufts, believes that what we think of as a uniquely human trait could be simpler than most of us thought.


Via Mau
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Warbots 2.0

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the FCC's Net Neutrality Proposal

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the FCC's Net Neutrality Proposal | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
This is our chance to tell the government how to guarantee a free and open internet. Here's a rundown of key issues so you can make your voice heard.
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Video reveals entire organism's neurons at work

Video reveals entire organism's neurons at work | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Researchers image complete nervous system in real time.
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Phenomenology & Practice

Phenomenology & Practice | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

Phenomenology & Practice is a human science journal dedicated to the study of the lived experience of a broad range of human practices.


Via focusing_gr, Chriss Foster
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When Trilobites Ruled the World

When Trilobites Ruled the World | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
“The remains of trilobites, a diverse group of marine animals much older than dinosaurs, are remarkably well preserved, providing fresh insights of their anatomies and social behavior.”Trilobites may be the archetypal fossils, symbols of an archaic world long swept beneath the ruthless road grader of time. But we should all look so jaunty after half a billion years.At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Brian T. Huber, chairman of paleobiology, points to a flawless specimen of Walliserops, a five-inch trilobite that swam the Devonian seas around what is now Morocco some 150 million years before the first dinosaurs hatched. With its elongated, triple-tined head horn and a bristle brush of spines encircling its lower body, the trilobite could be a kitchen utensil for Salvador Dalí. Nearby is the even older Boedaspis ensifer, its festive nimbus of spiny streamers pointing every which way like the ribbons of a Chinese dancer.In most trilobites, each compound orb held hundreds of tiny calcite lenses, arranged in a tightknit honeycomb pattern, like the eye of a fly. But fairly late in trilobite evolution one group developed a different sort of eye, composed of a smaller number of larger, separated calcite lenses. As they described last spring in the journal Scientific Reports, Brigitte Schoenemann of the Universities of Cologne and Bonn in Germany and Euan N. K. Clarkson of the University of Edinburgh, used advanced scanning techniques, including synchrotron radiation, to examine specimens of these later, larger-lensed trilobite eyes. On the back of the lenses, the scientists were astonished to see traces of the sensory receptor cells that once linked the eyes to the brain. “It was extraordinary,” Dr. Schoenemann said. “As far as we know, these are the oldest receptor cells that have ever been seen in any fossil animal.”Analyzing the microstructure of the receptor tracings, the researchers concluded that the eyes were designed to work optimally in lowlight, murky conditions, a sign that some trilobites were turning reclusive, descending to deeper waters or burrowing farther into the mud to escape the proliferation of toothy marine predators and new crustacean competitors. Toward the end of the Paleozoic Era, the once-thriving trilobite tribe had been reduced to a scattering of species. And they, too, vanished in the great Permian extinction 252 million years ago.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Voids & Supervoids in the Universe

Voids & Supervoids in the Universe | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

Cosmic voids, and supervoids, are large volumes of space that are devoid of matter.  This includes normal matter, in the form of galaxies, and dark matter.  Initially, astronomers were not sure if the voids contained dark matter, even though there were no galaxies, but recent observations show that the halos of dark matter are not present.  The filamentary structure of galactic superclusters surrounds the voids.  While space is mostly empty, voids are large volumes, tens of megaparsecs across.  The largest confirmed supervoids are about 100 Mpc (325 million light-years) or more across .  The larger known voids include the Boötes Supervoid, and the Northern and Southern Local Supervoids.  To explain the cold spot in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), some astronomers propose a huge supervoid, tentatively dubbed the Eridanus or Great supervoid.  The Capricornus void is another disputed void, but would be around 230 Mpc across.  This link has some of the latest information on cosmic voids.


The Local Void is very large at approximately 60 Mpc long, and is located within the Virgo Supercluster.  Our own Local Cluster of galaxies lies on the edge of the void.  The dwarf galaxy Eso 461-36 lies within the void, but appears to be moving towards the boundary at around 216 km/second (135 miles/sec).  In addition, the Milky Way has been found to have three main components to its motion; two are attractive, towards the "great Attractor" at 455 km/second and the Virgo Cluster at 185 km/second, and one repulsive, away from the local void at approximately 260 km/second.


The center of the Boötes void, also known as the Great Void, is about 215 Mpc away from the Milky Way.  It is a near spherical region of space, some 75 to 100 Mpc across.  It  contains a much lower density of galaxies than expected, and to date, only about 60 galaxies have been found in the void, although there are probably more dwarf galaxies not yet detected.  Consider that the distance to our nearest large galaxy, Andromeda, is only 1% the diameter of the Boötes void, you would reasonably expect to find many more galaxies in that volume of space.  Assuming an average galaxy spacing of 10 million light-years, four times the distance to Andromeda, there would be approximately 2,000 galaxies in a volume of space the size of the Boötes void.  It is interesting in that the galaxies found are in a "tube" like area that runs through the void, leading to the hypothesis that it formed as the merger of a number of smaller voids.  The astronomer Greg Aldering has said, “If the Milky Way had been in the center of the Boötes void, we wouldn’t have known there were other galaxies until the 1960s” such is the low density.  However, the galaxies that have been found are brighter, on the average, than galaxies found outside of voids, which is perplexing.


The Eridanus Supervoid, or Great Void, is conjectural, and has been suggested as a way to explain the "cold spot" in the cosmic microwave background radiation, or CMB. This would be an extraordinarily large region of the universe, at least 150 Mpc or 500 million light-years across, and possibly twice this figure.  It is also very distant at between 1.8 Gpc and 3 Gpc (6 to 10 billion light-years).  Many astronomers and cosmologists do not accept the supervoid theory for the aberration in the CMB, but many of the alternatives are even more astounding including cosmic textures and parallel universes.  So the jury remains out on this one.


The Taurus Void is circular, about 30 Mpc across, and adjacent to the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster.  A few galaxies have been found inside it including UGC 2627 and UGC 2629 which are approximately 185 million light years away.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The  emptiness of empty 

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Operation American Spring Was Every Bit the Massive Success You Knew It Would Be

Operation American Spring Was Every Bit the Massive Success You Knew It Would Be | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
'It’s a very dismal turnout,' lamented 61 year old Jackie Milton of Jacksboro, Texas.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

less than 100 showed up!

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