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Whatever, Etc. 00024

Whatever, Etc. 00024 | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Related Articles: Whatever, Etc. 00021: The Loving Struggle 1 (keithwaynebrown.com) Whatever, Etc. 00022: The Loving Struggle 2 (keithwaynebrown.com) Whatever, Etc. 00023: The Loving Struggle 3 (ke...
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Moving forward... dipping into Critical Pedagogy by way of Existenzphilosophie.

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What Will Education Look Like in a More Open Future?

Technology and rapidly evolving student needs are influencing how schools can think about trust, autonomy and collaboration.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, April 17, 11:16 AM

Moving into the open access virtual world. I have enjoyed 11 years as a virtual librarian and I LOVE what I do.  Learning commons has never been more ubiquitous and democratic as we share and glean from each other.

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Oscillation - Berfrois

Oscillation - Berfrois | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
We propose a pragmatic romanticism unhindered by ideological anchorage. Thus, metamodernism shall be defined as the mercurial condition between and beyond irony and sincerity, naivety and knowingness, relativism and truth, optimism and doubt, in pursuit of a plurality of disparate and elusive horizons. We must go forth and oscillate!
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How the US Became an Oligarchy

How the US Became an Oligarchy | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
According to a new study from Princeton University, American democracy no longer exists.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Democracy schmocracy

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New instrument dates old skeleton before 'Lucy'; 'Little Foot' 3.67 million years old

New instrument dates old skeleton before 'Lucy'; 'Little Foot' 3.67 million years old | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
A skeleton named Little Foot is among the oldest hominid skeletons ever dated at 3.67 million years old, according to an advanced dating method. Little Foot is a rare, nearly complete skeleton of Australopithecus first discovered 21 years ago in a cave at Sterkfontein, in central South Africa. Stone tools found at a different level of the Sterkfontein cave also were dated at 2.18 million years old, making them among the oldest known stone tools in South Africa.
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Watch The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel () online - Amazon Instant Video

British pensioners on a tight budget move to a retirement home in india; their adventures there giving them a new lease on life.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Such a beautiful little film.

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The Virtues of Blogging as Scholarly Activity

The Virtues of Blogging as Scholarly Activity | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
There was a time when you could have pointed to a list of publications as a neat proxy for your academic life, but now you might want to reference not only your publications, but also a set of videos, presentations, blog posts, curated collections, and maybe even your social network. All of these combine to represent the modern academic. My blog sits at the heart of these, the place where I reference the other media and representations.
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What Dancy's Late Late Show appearance has to say about the philosopher's disappearance

What Dancy's Late Late Show appearance has to say about the philosopher's disappearance | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
On April 1, 2010, the professional philosopher Jonathan Dancy, who happens to be the father-in-law of Claire Danes, appeared on the Late Late Show to speak with Craig Ferguson about moral philosoph...
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

B

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What's the Difference Between Film and Reality?

What's the Difference Between Film and Reality? | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Your brain isn't so sure, according to Jeffrey M. Zacks' new book Flicker.
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Philosophy Bites Again Is a True Philosophical Gourmet

Philosophy Bites Again Is a True Philosophical Gourmet | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

This is a dinner party in book form, although with topics such as torture, group agency, hate speech, and the afterlife, it's not for the absent-minded.

Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Philosophizing via podcast, youtube, blogging, e-books, books... however philosophy can get beyond the walls of academe into the life of the commons.

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Ultra-cold mirrors could reveal gravity's quantum side

Ultra-cold mirrors could reveal gravity's quantum side | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

An experiment not much bigger than a tabletop, using ultra-cold metal plates, could serve up a cosmic feast. It could give us a glimpse of quantum gravity and so lead to a "theory of everything": one that unites the laws of quantum mechanics, governing the very small, and those of general relativity, concerning the monstrously huge.


Such theories are difficult to test in the lab because they probe such extreme scales. But quantum effects have a way of showing up unexpectedly. In a strange quantum phenomenon known as the Casimir effect, two sheets of metal held very close together in a vacuum will attract each other.


The effect occurs because, even in empty space, there is an electromagnetic field that fluctuates slightly all the time. Placing two metal sheets very close to one another limits the fluctuations between them, because the sheets reflect electromagnetic waves. But elsewhere the fluctuations are unrestricted, and this pushes the plates together.

James Quach at the University of Tokyo suggests that we might be able to observe the equivalent effect for gravity. That would, in turn, be direct evidence of the quantum nature of gravity: the Casimir effect depends on vacuum fluctuations, which are only predicted by quantum physics.


But in order to detect it, you would need something that reflects gravitational waves – the ripples in space-time predicted by general relativity. Earlier research suggested that superconductors (for example, metals cooled to close to absolute zero such that they lose all electrical resistance) might act as mirrors in this way.


"The quantum properties of superconductors may reflect gravitational waves. If this is correct, then the gravitational Casimir effect for superconductors should be large," says Quach. "The experiment I propose is feasible with current technology."


It's still unclear if superconductors actually reflect gravitational waves, however. "The exciting part of this paper has to do with a speculative idea about gravitational waves and superconductors," says Dimitra Karabali at Lehman College in New York. "But if it's right, it's wonderful."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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One day we could borrow ‘antifreeze’ proteins from ticks to resist cold

One day we could borrow ‘antifreeze’ proteins from ticks to resist cold | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Feeling a bit nippy? For now you'll have to stick to your hat and scarf to warm up, but one day some antifreeze proteins from a fish or a tick might do the trick.

In a preliminary study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE, researchers report using specially bred mice -- ones spliced with the genes that give ticks antifreeze cells -- to show that mammals can benefit from the proteins that other species use to keep from icing over.
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The Most Powerful Artwork I Have Ever Seen

The Most Powerful Artwork I Have Ever Seen | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
The most thunderstruck I've ever been by art was before the 13,000-year-old cave paintings of mammals in Niaux, France.

Via Zeteticus
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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, February 23, 1:54 PM

Amazing, Thanks! 

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Brew Ratios Around the World

Brew Ratios Around the World | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Written by Ben Blake Brewing espresso seems like a pretty straightforward process, but there are actually quite a few variables that we’re looking to control and balance at one time in order to get...
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

At B - M - C  |  Coffee & Tea, 1306 W. Hickory in Denton, TX, we do the 1:1.5 . 

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3quarksdaily: The Spectre of History: Thoughts on an Islamic Reformation

3quarksdaily: The Spectre of History: Thoughts on an Islamic Reformation | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
The powerless, freed from the responsibility of consequences, can wallow in their misery, create imaginary histories, and nurture delusions of promised grandeur. In imposing their new order, the European powers took away both the capacity of governance from Muslim rulers and the possibility of challenges to this governance from reformers, leaving a vacuum in political thinking. In time, this vacuum was filled by the detritus of history - revivalist ideologies and fantasies in the quest to reclaim a mythical lost state of purity and virtue – leading directly to the situation before us today.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Very informative piece. 

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To Blend or Not to Blend - Matt Perger

I don’t believe the majority of coffee-drinking customers are quite ready to appreciate and understand why roasters have suddenly dropped blends from their offering. Blends still hold a special place in customer’s hearts; they’re the flag-bearer for the business; the gateway to the rest of your offering. Don’t get me wrong: I’m definitely a strong advocate for exposing customers to unique and special coffees. I’m just wary of how we go about that as an industry.

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Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel Experiment: Helium atoms put in same quantum state, start appearing in same place

Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel Experiment: Helium atoms put in same quantum state, start appearing in same place | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

Quantum mechanics has so many counterintuitive features that it seems possible to learn a new one every month. Today's lesson involves particles that are set into the same quantum state and effectively become indistinguishable. Once they are indistinguishable, they start behaving that way, showing up in the same place even when we'd expect to see them distributed at random. In today's issue of Nature, a paper describes getting atoms to behave this way, blurring the lines between a quantum probability function and what we think of as a physical object.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

blurring the lines between probability and object

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Trappist Monks Are Trying to Save Venezuela's Dying Coffee Industry

Trappist Monks Are Trying to Save Venezuela's Dying Coffee Industry | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Up until the ban on coffee exports, Monasterio Trapense used to ship 150 kilos of coffee per week to be sold in the US—and even got away with it for a while after the ban, but it was short-lived. After the ship carrying what would be their last shipment left port, they were contacted by the head of the National Guard and told that that was it. No more of their coffee would be leaving Venezuela.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 1, 11:47 PM

This seems more important than many actions that humans undertake, helping each other.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Comics Debate & Discourse: How To Be a Hero By Being An Ally - Comic Book Resources

Comics Debate & Discourse: How To Be a Hero By Being An Ally  - Comic Book Resources | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Comics Debate & Discourse: How To Be a Hero By Being An Ally - Casey Gilly examines recent hot-button comics issues and talks through solutions for keeping the dialogue productive and compassionate.
Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

"When an issue comes up that hits emotional spots, the compulsion is to react -- and reactions are charged. This is when angry Tweets are sent, or snarky comments are made or feelings are aired with no regard for who is on the receiving end. Take a moment and check in with yourself: Has this approach been effective for you in the past? Has it ever yielded your desired outcome? Probably not, unless your desired outcome is to get into a screaming contest where everyone walks away hoarse. 

"Responding, on the other hand, is about listening to what someone else is saying before you have your retort planned. It's allowing your perception to be authentically influenced by new information and different viewpoints. It means that we all take a moment to acknowledge that we are vulnerable people; sometimes we are wrong. This is a good time to ask questions, and be interested in the answer without making assumptions. Hurt feelings hurt, and they aren't going to feel better by slathering them in accusations."

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The Fermi Paradox - Wait But Why

The Fermi Paradox - Wait But Why | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Scientists estimate that there are over 100,000 intelligent alien civilizations in our galaxy alone—but we've never heard anything from any of them. Here are 13 possible explanations for why.
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The Collection and the Cloud

The Collection and the Cloud | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
How do we talk about the politics of cultural records? If we cannot preserve everything, who defines what is worth saving?
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Does philosophy matter? | OUPblog

Does philosophy matter? | OUPblog | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

"Philosophers love to complain about bad reasoning. How can those other people commit such silly fallacies? Don’t they see how arbitrary and inconsistent their positions are? Aren’t the counter examples obvious? After complaining, philosophers often turn to humor. Can you believe what they said! Ha, ha, ha. Let’s make fun of those stupid people.

...I worry that this widespread tendency among philosophers puts us out of touch with the rest of society, including academics in other fields. It puts us out of touch partly because they cannot touch us: we cannot learn from others if we see them as unworthy of careful attention and charitable interpretation...

"...many top departments today view colleagues with suspicion when they choose to write accessible books instead of technical journal articles. Philosophers often risk their professional reputations when they appear on television or write for newspapers or magazines. How can they be serious about philosophy if they are willing to water down their views that much? Are they getting soft?"

Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

From OUP's Academic Insights for the Thinking World... 

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Hit board game lets players compete in designing aesthetic rock gardens - Asahi Shimbun

Hit board game lets players compete in designing aesthetic rock gardens - Asahi Shimbun | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
While online smartphone games are all the rage, a new board game in designing a traditional Japanese-style rock garden is showing there is still a market for old-fashioned fun.

Via Zenibo Publishing
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NASA Sees 'Bright Spots' On Dwarf Planet In Our Solar System

NASA Sees 'Bright Spots' On Dwarf Planet In Our Solar System | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Scientists are puzzled by a new image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which found two bright spots on the dwarf planet Ceres. The spots are noticeably brighter than other parts of the surface, which looks to be rocky and pockmarked.
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Solitude: The Most Underestimated Self-Development Necessity

Solitude: The Most Underestimated Self-Development Necessity | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it
Montaigne, the great French writer, said that “we must reserve a little back-shop, all our own, entirely free, wherein to establish our true liberty and principal retreat and solitude”.
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Biologists now think there is a wider spectrum than two sexes

Biologists now think there is a wider spectrum than two sexes | Pahndeepah Perceptions | Scoop.it

As a clinical geneticist, Paul James is accustomed to discussing some of the most delicate issues with his patients. But in early 2010, he found himself having a particularly awkward conversation about sex.


A 46-year-old pregnant woman had visited his clinic at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Australia to hear the results of an amniocentesis test to screen her baby's chromosomes for abnormalities. The baby was fine — but follow-up tests had revealed something astonishing about the mother. Her body was built of cells from two individuals, probably from twin embryos that had merged in her own mother's womb. And there was more. One set of cells carried two X chromosomes, the complement that typically makes a person female; the other had an X and a Y. Halfway through her fifth decade and pregnant with her third child, the woman learned for the first time that a large part of her body was chromosomally male1. “That's kind of science-fiction material for someone who just came in for an amniocentesis,” says James.


Sex can be much more complicated than it at first seems. According to the simple scenario, the presence or absence of a Y chromosome is what counts: with it, you are male, and without it, you are female. But doctors have long known that some people straddle the boundary — their sex chromosomes say one thing, but their gonads (ovaries or testes) or sexual anatomy say another. Parents of children with these kinds of conditions — known as intersex conditions, or differences or disorders of sex development (DSDs) — often face difficult decisions about whether to bring up their child as a boy or a girl. Some researchers now say that as many as 1 person in 100 has some form of DSD2.


When genetics is taken into consideration, the boundary between the sexes becomes even blurrier. Scientists have identified many of the genes involved in the main forms of DSD, and have uncovered variations in these genes that have subtle effects on a person's anatomical or physiological sex. What's more, new technologies in DNA sequencing and cell biology are revealing that almost everyone is, to varying degrees, a patchwork of genetically distinct cells, some with a sex that might not match that of the rest of their body. Some studies even suggest that the sex of each cell drives its behaviour, through a complicated network of molecular interactions. “I think there's much greater diversity within male or female, and there is certainly an area of overlap where some people can't easily define themselves within the binary structure,” says John Achermann, who studies sex development and endocrinology at University College London's Institute of Child Health.


These discoveries do not sit well in a world in which sex is still defined in binary terms. Few legal systems allow for any ambiguity in biological sex, and a person's legal rights and social status can be heavily influenced by whether their birth certificate says male or female.


“The main problem with a strong dichotomy is that there are intermediate cases that push the limits and ask us to figure out exactly where the dividing line is between males and females,” says Arthur Arnold at the University of California, Los Angeles, who studies biological sex differences. “And that's often a very difficult problem, because sex can be defined a number of ways.”


That the two sexes are physically different is obvious, but at the start of life, it is not. Five weeks into development, a human embryo has the potential to form both male and female anatomy. Next to the developing kidneys, two bulges known as the gonadal ridges emerge alongside two pairs of ducts, one of which can form the uterus and Fallopian tubes, and the other the male internal genital plumbing: the epididymes, vas deferentia and seminal vesicles. At six weeks, the gonad switches on the developmental pathway to become an ovary or a testis. If a testis develops, it secretes testosterone, which supports the development of the male ducts. It also makes other hormones that force the presumptive uterus and Fallopian tubes to shrink away. If the gonad becomes an ovary, it makes oestrogen, and the lack of testosterone causes the male plumbing to wither. The sex hormones also dictate the development of the external genitalia, and they come into play once more at puberty, triggering the development of secondary sexual characteristics such as breasts or facial hair.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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