Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children
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Pediatric Laser Acupuncture and Renal Biopsy | Clinical Trials Search | UCSF Medical Center

Pediatric Laser Acupuncture and Renal Biopsy | Clinical Trials Search | UCSF Medical Center | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Pediatric Laser Acupuncture and Renal Biopsy

STATUS: Recruiting

SPONSORS:
University of California, San Francisco

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test if treatment with laser therapy in pediatric patients undergoing renal biopsies will improve patient satisfaction of the overall procedure. In this study, the participant will receive a laser acupuncture treatment targeting either kidney acupoints or targeting "sham" points not associated with the kidney; the participant will not get both. Both treatment sessions are given by a certified medical acupuncturist. The patient will still receive standard pain control protocols with anesthetic medications like lidocaine plus ketamine or fentanyl and versed during the biopsy, along with pain management after the procedure. All medication will be administered without regard for which group the participant has been randomized, as the treatment team will also be blinded. Hypothesis: We will test the hypothesis that treatment with laser acupuncture in patients undergoing renal biopsies will improve patient satisfaction of the overall procedure. Specific Aims: Specific Aim 1: Determine whether the use of laser acupuncture improves patient's overall satisfaction of renal biopsy. Specific Aim 2: Determine whether the use of laser acupuncture decreases the amount of sedative medication given during renal biopsy.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator), Primary Purpose: Supportive Care

Official Title

Efficacy of Laser Therapy as an Adjuvant Treatment During Kidney Biopsies to Decrease Anxiety and Pain.

Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study: 7 Years - 25 Years

Genders Eligible for Study

Both

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Acupuncture helps young patients manage pain and nausea

Acupuncture helps young patients manage pain and nausea | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
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(Medical Xpress)—The pink plastic box that Cynthia Kim, MD, EdD, opens at the bedside of a young patient at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco looks like it might contain art supplies. But inside is everything she needs to provide an ancient form of pain relief.

Kim is one of three physicians within the UCSF Department of Pediatrics trained to perform acupuncture on hospitalized patients, making UCSF one of a very few academic medical centers to offer this complementary treatment to both inpatients and outpatients.

Kim, a hospitalist specializing in pain management and palliative care, grew up in Korea where traditional Chinese medicine was the first-line treatment for family ailments. Her pediatrics training in the United States schooled her in western medicine, but Kim now offers young patients the best of both worlds.

Kim, along with pediatric hospitalist Karen Sun, MD, and pediatric rehabilitation specialist Mitul Kapadia, MD, is a licensed medical acupuncturist – a physician trained to provide acupuncture to hospitalized patients.

Her expertise is provided through the Integrative Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care (IP3) service, which provides both traditional and complementary pain management and palliative care for children at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco.

An Effective Complementary Therapy

In light of studies that have shown the benefit of this 2,000-year old treatment for conditions such as nausea, back pain, anxiety and headaches, insurance companies are increasingly covering acupuncture as a complementary treatment, said Kim.

About 3 million people in the U.S. currently use acupuncture as part of their health care, she said.

The IP3 team provided more than 200 acupuncture consults in 2013 to hospitalized patients. Most of the patients Kim sees are undergoing cancer treatment and use acupuncture to help manage chronic nausea from chemotherapy or to relieve discomfort from other aspects of their treatment.

Cynthia Kim, MD, EdD, opens the pink box that contains the tools she uses to perform acupuncture on her young patients. Credit: David Law

Acupuncture has been shown to reduce nausea by up to 70 percent, according to Kim. The treatment, which very rarely has side effects, can also help with post-surgical pain.

Controlled studies of acupuncture in pediatric patients have shown its usefulness in managing nausea after surgical removal of tonsils and adenoids and following eye surgery to correct strabismus. It has also been shown to help reduce chronic headache pain in children. Just how acupuncture works is not well understood, but it may stimulate the release of neurotransmitters such as endorphins and serotonin or otherwise inhibit pain transmission.

Acupuncture is based on the theory that energy flows along meridians, or channels, in the body, and that blockages in this flow lead to illness.

Acupuncturists memorize thousands of pressure points along major and minor meridians that are believed to affect body functions, said Kim. She often applies acupuncture to a nausea pressure point along the forearm, but points around the ear are also useful in managing the stress and anxiety that can accompany hospital treatment.

Laser Acupuncture Offers Alternative to Needles

Traditionally, acupuncture involves inserting very thin needles into the body, but there are a number of variations on classic acupuncture that are also effective, including adding electrical stimulation to the acupuncture point, or simply applying pressure.

Laser acupuncture is a particularly popular option for young children. It uses infrared light from a device that resembles a small flashlight to deliver an imperceptible dose of thermal energy to the pressure point. Research has shown laser acupuncture to be as effective as needles, said Kim, which is a boon for young patients who may become anxious at the sight of yet another needle, even one that is painless.

"They'd much rather see me use my little red light," said Kim with a smile.

Effective acupuncture is tailored to an individual's personality traits, so Kim typically spends a half-hour with patients during treatments to get to know them. She clearly relishes the time she spends with each child.

"Acupuncture involves touching, and that is a part of the healing process that is not emphasized in western medicine," she said.

After evaluating a patient to see if symptoms are likely to respond to acupuncture, Kim typically administers five treatments over the course of several weeks. She then teaches parents and children how to treat these same points on their own with acupressure. About half of the children who receive treatment during their hospitalizations also use acupuncture on an outpatient basis, often through the IP3 service's weekly clinic.

Ongoing Research

Now that acupuncture is incorporated into pediatric care at UCSF, the team plans to add to the body of research on how it can best be used.

Kim is conducting a controlled trial using laser acupuncture on young patients who undergo renal biopsies each year at the children's hospital. The biopsy involves inserting a large needle into the kidney, a procedure that can be painful and make patients anxious.

The study is comparing actual to sham treatment by means of pre- and post-treatment patient surveys. Preliminary data suggest a 50-percent decrease in the use of pain medications and anxiety, said Kim.

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Acupuncture & Herbs Cut Childhood Emergency Asthma

Acupuncture & Herbs Cut Childhood Emergency Asthma | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Children with asthma receiving a combination of acupuncture, herbal medicine and conventional medications have superior patient outcomes, less visits to emergency rooms, and fewer hospitalizations than children receiving only conventional medications. Researchers investigated 12,580 children receiving asthma medical care across 15 multi-hospitals in a five year study. Traditional Chinese Medicine (acupuncture, herbal medicine, Chinese Tuina massage, herbal pastes) was combined with pharmaceutical drugs including inhaled bronchodilators and steroids in the study protocol. The integrative medicine approach, TCM plus conventional drugs, produced an astonishing result. Not a single child receiving integrative medicine during the study required an emergency room (ER) visit or hospitalization. The superior clinical outcomes and reduction of medical emergencies suggests that integrating TCM into conventional protocols benefits children with asthma.

Single-Payer Investigation
The Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) of Taiwan established a single-payer healthcare system in 1995 called the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI). Under this system, an examination of 1 million patient records yielded a sample size of 12,580 asthmatic children for investigation. The BNHI paid for all of the medical visits and examined the cost-effectiveness of combining TCM therapies (acupuncture, herbs, Tuina massage) and conventional pharmaceutical care. It was found that there is an additional upfront cost to provide TCM therapies but there is a savings on the backend in reduced emergency room visits and hospitalizations. The findings demonstrate that adding acupuncture, herbal medicine and other TCM procedures to conventional protocols provides a cost-effective approach for asthmatic children while producing superior patient outcomes.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatment combined with conventional treatment provided additional benefits. There was a reduction in school absenteeism. The children’s parents had less disruption of their work schedules. There was less of a burden on families to provide caregivers. The government shouldered lower overall costs and responsibilities associated with asthmatic care. The study demonstrates that combining TCM with conventional medicine for asthmatic children “may have a substantial impact” in reducing the severity of asthma, frequency of emergency services, hospitalizations and costs of providing care by parents.

The study documents several herbal formulas and acupuncture points found effective for the treatment of asthma by modern research. The herbal formula Xiao Qing Long Tang is effective for treating asthma with white sputum and a nocturnal cough. Additional research demonstrates Xiao Qing Long Tang’s ability to “attenuate allergic airway inflammation” and to “prevent asthma through neurotropin regulation.” The herbal formula Ding Chuan Tang demonstrates effectiveness for treating asthma with yellow sputum. Additional research shows that Ding Chuan Tang “may improve airway hyper-responsiveness in stabilized asthmatic children.”

Two important acupuncture points were highlighted in the research. LU10 (Yuji) and ST36 (Zusanli) were shown to “regulate cardiopulmonary function, Fas and Bcl-2 mRNA expression, and promote eosinophil apoptosis in the asthmatic state….” Chinese therapeutic massage, Tuina, at the DU and Bladder Foot-Taiyang channels on the back improved “key pulmonary functions in asthmatic children.” Herbal pastes applied to acupuncture points BL13 (Feishu), BL12 (Fengmen) and DU14 (Dazhui) demonstrated the ability to help asthmatics. The herbal pastes consisted of:

Bai Jie (Sinapis alba L., white mustard)
Xi Xin (Asarum heterotropoides, wild ginger)
Gan Sui (Euphorbia kansui)
Yanhusuo (Corydalis yanhusuo)
Bing Pian (Dryobalanops aromatica, borneol)
Gan Jiang (Zingiber officinale, dried ginger)

Two additional key observations were made. The incidence of children with asthma is increasing over time and those unresponsive to conventional therapies may benefit from adding Traditional Chinese Medicine to the regime of care. The researchers note, “Our findings suggest that asthmatic children at partly controlled level(s) under conventional therapy may benefit from adjuvant treatment with integrated TCM.” This study and its recommendations demonstrates the inherent impetus within a single-payer healthcare system to support improved patient outcomes and cost-effective care.


Reference:
Hung, Yu-Chiang, I-Ling Hung, Mao-Feng Sun, Chih-Hsin Muo, Bei-Yu Wu, Ying-Jung Tseng, and Wen-Long Hu. "Integrated traditional Chinese medicine for childhood asthma in Taiwan: a Nationwide cohort study." BMC complementary and alternative medicine 14, no. 1 (2014): 389

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Acupuncture effective for pain management post tonsillectomy surgery

Acupuncture effective for pain management post tonsillectomy surgery | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
A researchers has revealed that medical acupuncture is effective in reducing pain after tonsillectomy surgery and can be used as an alternative to codeine.
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Acupuncture Helps Stanford Intensive Care Infants

Acupuncture Helps Stanford Intensive Care Infants | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
A Stanford University study finds acupuncture effective for helping infants receiving medical care.

 

Acupuncture Helps Stanford Intensive Care Infants

on 20 October 2014.

 

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A Stanford University study finds acupuncture effective for reducing the need for sedative medications for neonates and infants undergoing treatments in the intensive care unit. Dr. Golianu, MD (Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University), Christina Almgren, PNP (Stanford Children’s Health, Stanford University), et. al., note that high doses of opioids and benzodiazepines are often required for neonates and infants for the purposes of pain management and sedation. Cessation from medications lead to withdrawal symptoms and irritability. The researchers cite acupuncture’s documented ability to reduce pain, irritability and withdrawal symptoms in adults. 

The research team applied acupuncture in the pediatric setting to see if the therapeutic effects known to help adults also applies to neonates and infants. They concluded that the pediatric patients “tolerated acupuncture well and required a decreased amount of pain medication for treating agitation and withdrawal.” The study concludes, “Acupuncture may be a useful adjunct for managing agitation and withdrawal in neonates and infants in the intensive care unit, and may lead to a decreased need for sedative medications.” Acupuncture points used in the study were Yin Tang, ST36, and PC6 plus acupuncture point protocols developed by the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association.

In a related study, doctors from the University of Washington School of Medicine (Seattle, Washington) conclude, “Our experience suggests that acupuncture therapy is a safe, non-pharmacological option for prevention of emergence delirium in children undergoing general anesthesia.” The doctors note that delirium occurs in approximately 12 - 50% of pediatric patients receiving general anesthesia. They add that pharmaceutical drugs used to manage delirium often produce unwanted adverse effects including “sedation and longer recovery time from anesthesia.”

The study came up with some very interesting findings. All children in the study receiving intravenous anesthesia plus acupuncture required less quantities of propofol, an amnestic-hypnotic drug. A total of 83% of patients did not get delirium. An additional 17% had relatively mild cases of delirium and were able to “communicate the source of distress.” The acupuncture points used in the study were SP8, HT7, and LR3. Needle stimulation was applied to the three acupuncture points. Magnet therapy was applied to ear Shenmen. No complications occurred demonstrating that acupuncture is both safe and effective in the prevention of pediatric emergence delirium. 

Acupuncture Points Close-Up
Some of the acupuncture points used are highlighted here.

Yintang (M-HN-3, Hall of Impression)
This acupoint is located in the glabella and is at the midpoint between the medial extremities of the eyebrows. Yintang activates the channels, stops pain and calms the shen (spirit). This point is especially useful for children because it is classically indicated for the treatment of childhood fright, both chronic and acute. 

ST36 (Zusanli, Leg Three Measures)
This point is located 3 cun below ST35 and is one fingerbreadth from the anterior crest of the tibia. There is a notch in the tibia to which this point is directly level to and lateral from. ST36 benefits the spleen and stomach qi and blood. It strengthens weak and deficient conditions and is used to benefit digestion. ST36 finds use for these investigations and is indicated for the treatment of mania and neurasthenia.

PC6 (Neiguan, Inner Pass)
This acupoint is located 2 cun above the transverse wrist crease between PC3 and PC7 between the tendons of the palmaris longus and flexor carpi radialis. PC6 calms the shen and heart, regulates qi and stops pain. It is useful for many conditions including vomiting, nausea, palpitations and mental disorders. The traditional designations of PC6 are as follows: Luo Point, Confluent Point of the Yin Wei channel (paired to SP4).


References:
Golianu, Brenda, Jeannie Seybold, and Christina Almgren. "Acupuncture Helps Reduce Need for Sedative Medications in Neonates and Infants Undergoing Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Case Series." Medical Acupuncture 26, no. 5 (2014): 279-285.
Authors: 
Dr. Golianu, MD. Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
Christina Almgren, PNP. Stanford Children's Health, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.

Kundu, Anjana, Nathalia Jimenez, and Anne Lynn. "Acupuncture therapy for prevention of emergence delirium in children undergoing general anesthesia." Medical Acupuncture 20, no. 3 (2008): 151-154.
Authors:
Dr. Anjana Kundu, MD. Dr. Nathalia Jimenez, MD. Dr. Anne Lynn, MD. University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.

- See more at: http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1391-acupuncture-helps-stanford-intensive-care-infants#sthash.rU5hpIT4.dpuf

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Acupuncture for Children - The Epoch Times

Acupuncture for Children - The Epoch Times | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Where and How to Massage 

There are 363 acupressure points on the regular acupuncture channels and countless extra points, so how do you choose what points to use? An excellent strategy is to have a consultation with a pediatric acupuncturist and have them teach the right points to do for the child’s specific condition.

Another idea is to get an acupressure reference guide that has easy-to-read point location descriptions and that also has recommendations for specific point protocols for the most common pediatric ailments. Once you know the right points, then you’ll have the power to help your child anytime and anywhere.

There are three easy acupressure massage techniques that any parent can easily learn. The first is to locate the point and simply hold down on it, as if the finger were an acupuncture needle. 

The second is to locate the point and then massage it in small circles, either clockwise or counter-clockwise. The third is to locate the point and then stroke the area back and forth. This generally works best for points on the arms and legs.

Remember that with acupressure, a general area is being massaged and that pinpoint precision is not as important as it would be with an acupuncture needle.

Tools 

Acupressure can be done with either finger pressure or with a metal tool. Most pediatric acupuncturists will stimulate the acupressure points using a metal “shonishin” device. The reason for the use of a metal tool is that it conducts the Qi or energy of the body more efficiently than finger pressure alone. This is why acupuncture needles are made of metal.

For a do-it-yourself acupressure tool, a coin, ring, or other smooth metal object can be used. Some babies and children don’t like to be massaged with a metal tool, though, so for them standard finger pressure will also be effective. Just double the amount of time that is spent on each point. 

Ultimately, the most important thing is that the acupressure points are being massaged, so however it can be done is just fine.

Getting Your Child to Cooperate 

As soon as a baby is old enough to turn over and crawl, administering an acupressure treatment can become quite a challenge. 

While a parent will want them to be still for a few minutes, all they will want to do is be on the move. To get the acupressure done will require some savvy parenting, but just as with diaper changes and necessary medications, a way can be found to do it.

It is usually best to put babies in a highchair or car seat so that they are somewhat restrained during their treatment. Another idea is to go into the bathroom and close the door. 

To engage an older child in the actual massage, stickers can be put on the points, or points can be written on and then washed (massaged) off.

‘Less Is More’

Children respond quickly to acupressure, and this positive response can sometimes cause parents to get carried away and over-treat their kids. It is best to treat chronic conditions once a day and acute conditions twice a day. Chinese Medicine is designed to ignite the body’s own healing energy, so overkill is not necessary. 

With kids, the adage is “less is more.” Start simply with acupressure sessions with children. Pick one condition and treat that for a week. Use two or three points and then add more as needed. Sometimes when one condition is cleared, then other co-existing problems will also disappear. So go slowly and see what happens.

There is nothing esoteric or complicated about practicing acupressure on children. Anyone can do it with some simple instruction, and then it is literally in their hands for whenever it is needed.

It is an effective, inexpensive, and natural remedy with a tradition that spans several thousand years, so you can have confidence in its ability to help with the most basic pediatric complaints. Adding acupressure to your parenting bag of tricks is a great idea—you have nothing to lose, and your child will have so much to gain.

Jennifer Taveras, L.Ac.

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Acupuncture MRI Shows Lasting Pain Relief

Acupuncture MRI Shows Lasting Pain Relief | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Acupuncture MRI Shows Lasting Pain Relief

on 18 December 2014.

Acupuncture induces lasting pain relief. Doctors using MRI neuroradiology scans captured images showing how acupuncture accomplishes enduring analgesia. The researchers state that the MRI images reveal that “acupuncture and pain mobilize overlapping brain regions and the same intrinsic networks.” They add that “acupuncture consists of specific brain activation–modulating patterns that outlast the needling period….” 

The researchers note that “most acupuncture studies conclude that the acupuncture-induced decrease in pain perception consists of acupuncture specific brain activations….” The current study concurs with prior research findings. In this investigation, the team of doctors tested pain relief in humans induced by manual needling of acupuncture points LI4, LV3 and ST36.

The LI4 and LV3 acupuncture point combination is a classic Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) prescription for pain relief. Together, these acupuncture points are called Si Guan, roughly translated as the four gates or four bars. They are a set of four acupuncture points located bilaterally on the hands and feet. ST36, translated as leg three miles and located on the lower leg, is also indicated for the TCM function of activating the channels and alleviating pain.

The researchers note that sham acupuncture and true acupuncture are different. They cite “a recent individual meta-analysis based on data from 29 randomized clinical trials with a total of 17,922 patients reported clear differences between real acupuncture and sham procedures for several chronic pain conditions.” Published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, the researchers conclude that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain including neck and back pain, shoulder pain, osteoarthritis and headaches.

The new MRI findings demonstrate that the effective actions exerted by true acupuncture points are specific to certain brain networks. A great deal of research on the brain pathways and biochemical mechanisms relating to acupuncture treatments has been published within the last two years. One of the more intriguing studies demonstrates that a biochemical responsible for pain reduction is activated by acupuncture. 

The analgesic biochemical is a chemokine called CXCL10. Acupuncture stimulates its expression which, in turn, reduces pain and inflammation by activating natural opioids in the body. In general, chemokines attract white blood cells to sites of infection to assist in immune system responses. The chemokine CXCL10, when activated by electroacupuncture, triggers powerful anti-inflammatory responses. 

 

Electroacupuncture was shown to stimulate several other important responses including the augmentation of interferon (IFN)-gama and mRNA expression and increases in opioid peptide containing macrophages. The researchers add that electroacupuncture “elicited long-term antinociception,” reduced sensitivity to pain. The researchers found that CXCL10 regulates “opioid-containing macrophages as (a) key regulator of electroacupuncture-induced antinociception.”

The study measured that acupuncture “suppressed selected pro- and enhanced anti-inflammatory cytokines” and “increased the production of the cytokine IFN-gamma and the chemokine CXCL10 at the site of inflammation leading to an increase in opioid-containing CXCR3+ macrophages.” In addition, “Macrophage-derived opioid peptides could activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons and suppressed inflammatory pain. Taken together we identified a new molecular pathway of acupuncture-induced analgesia.”

Prior to this research, it was known that acupuncture caused opioid peptide releases in the spinal cord, brain and peripheral nervous system. The new research extends “these findings by demonstrating that electroacupuncture stimulated the increased numbers of leukocytes (macrophages) containing the three opioid peptides END, ENK, and DYN and that all three opioid peptides mediated antinociception to thermal and mechanical stimuli….”

Refereneces:

Theysohn, Nina, Kyung-Eun Choi, Elke R. Gizewski, Ming Wen, Thomas Rampp, Thomas Gasser, Gustav J. Dobos, Michael Forsting, and Frauke Musial. "Acupuncture-Related Modulation of Pain-Associated Brain Networks During Electrical Pain Stimulation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study." The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (2014). 
Author affiliations:
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
University Clinic of Neuroradiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health
Science, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.

Vickers AJ, Cronin AM, Maschino AC, et al. Acupuncture for Chronic Pain: Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med. Published online September 10, 2012. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2012.3654.

Schiapparelli P, Allais G, Rolando S, et al. Acupuncture in
primary headache treatment. Neurol Sci 2011;32 Suppl
1:S15-18.

Wang, Ying, Rebekka Gehringer, Shaaban A. Mousa, Dagmar Hackel, Alexander Brack, and Heike L. Rittner. "CXCL10 Controls Inflammatory Pain via Opioid Peptide-Containing Macrophages in Electroacupuncture." PloS one 9, no. 4 (2014): e94696.

- See more at: http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1409-acupuncture-mri-shows-lasting-pain-relief#sthash.wqwIy3Ip.dpuf


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Acupuncture effective for pain management post tonsillectomy surgery

Acupuncture effective for pain management post tonsillectomy surgery | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
A researchers has revealed that medical acupuncture is effective in reducing pain after tonsillectomy surgery and can be used as an alternative to codeine.
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Studies: acupuncture as a local anaesthetic in the case of children

Studies: acupuncture as a local anaesthetic in the case of children | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

LOCAL ANESTHETICS

Rosted, P. and Bundgaard, M.; Can Acupuncture Reduce the Induction Time of a Local Anaesthetic? - A Pilot Study. Acupunct Med 2003. Vol.21[3], p.92-99. 

Schwartz, L.; Acupuncture augmentation of local anesthesia with intravenous sedation for a child undergoing awake craniotomy. Med Acup 1998. Vol.10[1], p.47-48.

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Acupuncture After Surgery - for children

A California doctor is using an alternative form of pain management for surgery patients... acupuncture. And it's working.
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Research: The York acupuncture safety study: prospective survey of 34,000 treatments by traditional acupuncturists (2000) | BMJ

Research:  The York acupuncture safety study: prospective survey of 34,000 treatments by traditional acupuncturists (2000) | BMJ | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Participants, methods, and results The study involved a prospective postal audit of treatments undertaken during a four week period in 2000. All 1848 professional acupuncturists who were members of the British Acupuncture Council and were practising in the United Kingdom were invited to record details of adverse events and mild transient reactions after treatment. Standardised self report forms were used. Participating practitioners also provided information on themselves, including age, sex, length of training, and years of practice. To have a 95% probability that no serious event occurs in n treatments, a survey sample size needs to be three times n.4 On this basis, a sample of 30 000 treatments was sought. Piloting indicated that a four week period was needed. A total of 574 practitioners participated, 31% of the total population. The mean age of participants was 44.8 years (range 23-79 years), 65% were female, and 62% had been practising acupuncture for more than five years. Information on sex, training college, and length of practice was available from the British Acupuncture Council's database. Participants were sufficiently representative of the population of practitioners for a re-weighting of the primary data to be unnecessary. Participating practitioners reported on 34 407 treatments. Practitioners were asked to give details of any adverse events they considered to be “significant,” including any event that was “unusual, novel, dangerous, significantly inconvenient, or requiring further information.” There were no reports of serious adverse events, defined as events requiring hospital admission, leading to permanent disability, or resulting in death (95% confidence interval 0 to 1.1 per 10 000 treatments). Practitioners did, however, report 43 minor adverse events, a rate of 1.3 (0.9 to 1.7) per 1000 treatments. The most common events were severe nausea and fainting (table). Three avoidable events—two patients had needles left in, and one patient had moxibustion burns to the skin—were caused by practitioners' errors. View this table: In this window In a new window Details of 43 minor adverse events associated with 34 407 acupuncture treatments, all reported as “significant” by practitioners Participating practitioners recorded 10 920 mild transient reactions occurring in 5136 treatments, 15% (14.6% to 15.3%) of the 34 407 total. Some local reactions at the site of needling were reported—mild bruising in 587 (1.7%) cases, pain in 422 (1.2%) cases, and bleeding in 126 (0.4%) cases. Patients experienced an aggravation of existing symptoms after 966 (2.8%) treatments, 830 (86%) of which were followed by an improvement, possibly indicating a positive “healing crisis.” The most commonly reported mild transient reactions were “feeling relaxed” in 4098 (11.9%) cases and “feeling energised” in 2267 (6.6%) cases, symptoms that often indicate an encouraging response to treatment.3

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Efficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgaris -- Son et al. 28 (3): 126 -- Acupuncture in Medicine

Efficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgaris -- Son et al. 28 (3): 126 -- Acupuncture in Medicine | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med 2010;28:126-129 doi:10.1136/aim.2010.003004

Original papersEfficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgarisByeong-Kook Son, Younghee Yun, In-Hwa Choi

+Author Affiliations

Department of Oriental Dermatology, Kyung Hee University, East-West Neo Medical Center, Seoul, KoreaCorrespondence toDr In-Hwa Choi, Department of Oriental Dermatology, Kyung Hee University, East-West Neo Medical Center, 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Korea; inhwajun@khnmc.or.krAccepted 4 August 2010Abstract

Background Ah shi point acupuncture involves inserting needles at painful or pathological sites.

Objective To evaluate the efficacy of ah shi point and general acupuncture point treatment of acne vulgaris.

Methods 36 subjects were recruited and randomised in a double-blind (patient-blind and observer-blind) controlled trial to receive acupuncture either at general acupuncture points only, or at both general acupuncture points and ah shi points 12 times over 6 weeks. The subjects were evaluated using the following outcome measurements: an inflammatory lesion count, a quality-of-life scale (Skindex-29) and a subjective symptom score.

Results After 12 treatment sessions, there was a significant reduction in the inflammatory acne lesion counts, the Skindex-29 scores and the subjective symptom scores from baseline in both groups, but no significant difference between groups.

Conclusions Acupuncture treatment of moderate acne vulgaris was associated with reduction of inflammatory lesions and improvement of the quality of life.

Accepted 4 August 2010


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BMJ research article: The use of laser acupuncture for the treatment of neurogenic pruritus in a child – a case history -- Stellon 23 (1): 31 -- Acupuncture in Medicine

BMJ research article: The use of laser acupuncture for the treatment of neurogenic pruritus in a child – a case history -- Stellon 23 (1): 31 -- Acupuncture in Medicine | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med 2005;23:31-33 doi:10.1136/aim.23.1.31

Case reportThe use of laser acupuncture for the treatment of neurogenic pruritus in a child – a case historyAnthony Stellon, general practitioner medical acupuncturist

+Author Affiliations

Dover, UK, stellon@btinternet.comAbstract

This report describes the successful treatment using laser acupuncture of a six year old girl with neurogenic pruritus of the abdomen. It is the first case report of neurogenic pruritus treated by laser acupuncture. The main advantage of using low energy laser, as opposed to acupuncture needles, to stimulate points, is that low energy laser causes little or no sensation, which is particularly useful when treating children.

  


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Who can have acupuncture? Is it safe for children? Yes. Find out more...

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Acupuncture efficacy in the treatment of persistent primary nocturnal enuresis. [Arab J Nephrol Transplant. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture efficacy in the treatment of persistent primary nocturnal enuresis. [Arab J Nephrol Transplant. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Arab J Nephrol Transplant. 2013 Sep;6(3):173-6.Acupuncture efficacy in the treatment of persistent primary nocturnal enuresis.El Koumi MA1, Ahmed SA, Salama AM.Author information AbstractINTRODUCTION:

This study aimed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese acupuncture in the treatment of persistent primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE).

METHODS:

Fifty children and adolescents suffering from persistent PNE were recruited from the Pediatrics and Urology Outpatient Clinic of Zagazig University Hospital during the year 2010. They included 31 boys and 19 girls, with a mean age of 116 ± years (range 9-17 years). The children and their parents underwent thorough counseling followed by two courses of treatment, each course administered over 10 consecutive days. Patients were instructed to continue regular follow-up, every three months, after starting the therapy. The response rate (cure, improvement, or failure) was monitored by recording dry nights and the number of spontaneous arousals to void per week on a calendar. Children who showed partial or no response after six months of observation received another two courses of acupuncture therapy, and were followed up for a further six months period.

RESULTS:

After the initial two courses of treatment, the cure rate at six months was 76% with an additional 18% achieving partial improvement. Twelve children needed another two courses of treatment. After one year of follow-up, 92% of patients showed complete cure and 8% showed failure of acupuncture therapy.

CONCLUSION:

Acupuncture treatment in patients with PNE appears effective in increasing the percentage of dry nights, with stable results even after the end of treatment courses. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the therapeutic mechanism of acupuncture. Keywords: Acupuncture Therapy; Nocturnal Enuresis; Traditional Medicine.

PMID: 24053744 [PubMed - in process] Free full text

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Italian Journal of Pediatrics - Acupuncture in the treatment of infantile colic

Italian Journal of Pediatrics - Acupuncture in the treatment of infantile colic | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Regarding the recently published review ”Looking for new treatments of Infantile Colic“ by Savino et al. we want to add that positive effects of acupuncture have been demonstrated to release pain and agitation and that acupuncture seems to be a safe treatment when performed by trained acupuncturists. Inconclusive results in the few published articles on the subject can be due to different acupuncture points, different insertion time, different needling methods, differences in the outcome variables, in how the crying was measured and insufficient sample sizes. Further research is needed on understanding the utility, safety, and effectiveness of acupuncture in infants with colic.
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Acupuncture Effect on Inflammatory Markers in Pediatric Otitis Media With Effusion: A Pilot Study - myTomorrows

Acupuncture Effect on Inflammatory Markers in Pediatric Otitis Media With Effusion: A Pilot Study - myTomorrows | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Objective: to evaluate acupunctures effect on inflammatory markers in pediatric Otitis Media
with Effusion Methods: 100 Children with otitis media with effusion (OME) diagnosis, who are
in watchful waiting for 3 month, will be randomized in two groups: acupuncture and control.
50 Children in the acupuncture group will receive standard treatment combined with
acupuncture for 3 months. 50 Children in the control group will receive standard treatment
only, for the same time period. After 3 months, both groups will be reassessed for OME.
Children with no improvement from both groups will be assigned for tympanostomy.

Data collection: in children undergoing tympanostomy, middle ear effusion (MEE) will be
collected, analyzed and evaluated for group differences.
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Rady Doctor Uses Acupuncture Instead of Pain Meds

Rady Doctor Uses Acupuncture Instead of Pain Meds | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Rady Children's Hospital's Dr. James Ochi is one of the few doctors around the country using acupuncture in lieu of pain medicine.

 

NBC 7’s Greg Bledsoe shares the story of how Dr. James Ochi, of Rady Children's Hospital, is using acupuncture instead of pain medications on his latest patient, Tasha Bruner, an 18-year-old student who suffers from severe sinus issues. Under Ochi's watchful eye, Bruner had polyps removed for the third time. (Published Tuesday, Dec 17, 2013)Tuesday, Dec 17, 2013 • Updated at 5:24 PM PST

The operating room is not where most 18-year-old cheerleaders would choose to spend their spare time, but Tasha Bruner is getting used to it.

Tasha has severe sinus issues.

UCSD Medical Center's Smallest Baby Headed Home  Six months ago, Alexis Clarke was born at UCSD Medical Center at just 25 weeks. Weighing a mere 11 ounces, Alexis is the smallest baby ever born at the medical center. These days, she's bigger and healthier, and hopefully headed home soon. NBC 7's Greg Bledsoe shares her story of survival. (Published Wednesday, Nov 6, 2013)

“It’s all stuffed up. I can’t smell. I can’t breathe. I have to breathe through my mouth,” she explained.

On Tuesday, Tasha had polyps removed for the third time at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego.

Although this surgery can be painful to wake up from, Dr. James Ochi won’t be using pain medication. Instead, he’s using acupuncture.

Ochi said placing needles at pressure points on the hands and face lessen pain.

Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration banned the use of codeine in child having their tonsils removed.

“The number of narcotics I prescribe for my patients has hit the floor,” Ochi said.

Besides the codeine ban, Ochi said there are other reasons to use acupuncture. He said it works, it’s safer, and it’s less expensive than drugs.

“Acupuncture is cheap,” Ochi said. “It costs pennies per needle.”

However, Ochi said that might be why he is one of the few doctors around the country doing it.

“The sad truth is that acupuncture does not generate much money,” he said.

Ochi recently published a study involving 31 kids who said their pain level, on average, was 5.5 on a 1 to 10 scale.

“After acupuncture for about 15 minutes, their pain level fell to about 2,” Ochi said.

“For me, it is extremely moving to look at a child who is unhappy after surgery and with a few needles make them smile.”



Source: http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Rady-Doctor-Uses-Acupuncture-Instead-of-Pain-Meds-236296651.html#ixzz3NKMIbSun ;
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Children with Cancer UK | Complementary therapy

Children with Cancer UK | Complementary therapy | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
National childrens charity funding research, welfare and campaigning projects to help children with all types of cancer. Find information about childrens cancers and fundraising, or make a donation.

 

Complementary therapy

 

       

Complementary therapies are thought to be used by up to a third of cancer sufferers. These therapies may be used alongside the conventional treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, not as an alternative. 

Complementary therapies are generally used to help with the symptoms of disease and the side effects of treatment. Side effects such as nausea, vomiting, fatigue and pain are well known but depression and anxiety are also very common and complementary therapies can help reduce anxiety and promote relaxation. 

Some cancer centres offer complementary therapies directly. Some patients will need to seek independent practitioners; in all cases it is advisable to seek advice from your child’s doctor. Some complementary therapies may actually interfere with conventional treatments. 

Types of complementary therapies
There is a wide range of complementary therapies, but they can be broadly categorised as follows. Some of these categories overlap.

Alternative medical systems, such as acupuncture, homeopathy and Chinese medicine.Complex natural products, such as botanicals, and green tea.Energy therapies, such as Qi Gong, Reiki, therapeutic touch and magnet therapy.Exercise therapies, such as Tai Chi, yoga, and dance therapy.Manipulative therapies, such as chiropractic, massage, osteopathy and reflexology.Mind therapies, such as aromatherapy, art therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, imagery, mindfulness and meditation.Nutritional therapies, such as anti-oxidants, macrobiotics and vitamins.Spiritual therapies, such as prayer and healing.


Examples of complementary therapies and their use
Acupuncture
This involves using needles that stimulate anatomic points in the skin, causing energy to pass along paths in the body called meridians. This can help a person’s mental and physical health. 

The therapist needs formal training, regulated by the British Acupuncture Council. Acupuncture is NOT an effective treatment for cancer on its own, however it can relieve pain, nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. It is generally considered safe but should be avoided in certain conditions, such as skin that has been radiated, infected skin, those with low platelets or on anti-coagulants.

Visit the British Acupuncture Council for further information 

Aromatherapy
This involves delivering essential oils to the body, either by being applied to the skin, sprayed into the room, or inhaled. This can overlap with massage, healing touch and Reiki as these methods can also be used to deliver the oils. Again there is no evidence that aromatherapy alone can treat cancer but it has been studied for the treatment of stress and anxiety and to help nausea and pain. 

Aromatherapy has very few side effects and is recognised as being safe but of course allergic reactions or irritation of the skin could occur. Children enjoy choosing the aromas, and can receive these while they are playing.

Visit the International Federation of Aromatherapists for further information

Homeopathy:
This is an alternative type of medicine based on the principle that a substance taken in small amounts will cure the same symptoms it causes if taken in large amounts. The substances are alcohol- or water-based solutions containing very small amounts of minerals or chemicals. 

Homeopathy is performed by regulated practitioners, but cannot be used alone to treat cancer.  It can however improve the quality of life and reduce fatigue. There is limited safety research but there are no published cases of serious adverse effects reported. Before using any homeopathy you must discuss this with your cancer specialist.

Visit the British Homeopathic Association for further information

Imagery
Imagery involves mental exercises designed to allow the mind to influence the health and well-being of the body. The patient imagines sights, sounds, smells, tastes, or other sensations to relax them into a daydream state of mind. 

Imagery can be used with standard medical treatment in people with cancer and may be particularly helpful for younger children, to help them relax during conventional treatment, or during their stay in hospital. Evidence suggests it may reduce some of the side effects of chemotherapy. It is considered safe, and can be taught by a trained therapist, then practised at home.

Massage therapy
This involves pressing or rubbing the muscles and soft tissues of the body. There are several types of therapy but a qualified practitioner should have both training and experience, with certification showing the level of achievement. 

Massage therapy is not effective as a sole treatment for cancer but can relieve anxiety, depression, pain and improve general well-being. It is considered safe when performed by a trained therapist, but can cause temporary side effects such as pain. The therapist will know to avoid massaging areas that have blood clots, infection, fractures, open wounds, low platelet counts or known tumour sites.

Visit Massage Therapy UK for further information

Mindfulness meditation:
Mindfulness is a mind-body approach to well-being that can help change the way you think about experiences and reduce stress, anxiety and pain. Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to the present moment, using techniques like meditation, breathing and yoga. It helps a person become more aware of their thoughts and feelings so that instead of being overwhelmed by them, feel better able to manage them. This would be more appropriate for teenagers and young adults rather than young children.

Visit Be Mindful for further information

Natural Products
Natural products, such as herbs, vitamins and supplements are widely available, but there is no scientific evidence to support any particular supplement or diet. Good nutrition is very important and a dietician may be involved with patients who are unable to eat due to their cancer or experiencing side effects from treatment. 

Certain vitamins may even interfere with treatment so it is advised to avoid these altogether. Natural does not mean safe.

Reflexology
Reflexology is a non-intrusive complementary therapy, based on the theory that different points on the feet, lower leg, hands, face or ears correspond with different areas of the body. 

Reflexologists work holistically with their patients and work alongside conventional healthcare professionals to promote better health. Reflexology is a very easy therapy to receive. The therapist will use their hands to apply pressure to the feet, lower leg, hands, ears or face, depending on the type of reflexology chosen. Benefits include feelings of relaxation, wellbeing and lifting mood. Side effects may include transient discomfort during the treatment, but generally the experience should be relaxing. The therapist will avoid skin that has been radiated, infected, or those with low platelets or on anti-coagulants.

Visit the Association of Reflexologists for further information

Reiki
“Reiki” is Japanese for “universal life energy” and is an energy based therapy. It is based on the belief that a universal energy source supports the body’s own healing process. Practitioners access this energy allowing it to flow through the body to promote wellbeing. The therapist is trained, and places his or her hands over the patient until the therapist feels a flow of energy. The patient may feel a warmth, tingling, or a sensation of feeling relaxed and calm. 

Reiki is not an effective treatment for cancer used alone, but used as a complementary therapy alongside conventional treatments it can be helpful. There are no known side effects.

Visit the Reiki Association for further information

Yoga
The Sanskrit word yoga is translated as 'union'. The practice of yoga helps to co-ordinate the breath, mind and body to encourage balance, both internally and externally and promote feelings of relaxation and ease. There are more than 100 types of yoga but in the UK the most widely taught form is Hatha Yoga. 

Yoga teaches postures and movements to stretch, strengthen and flex the body, to develop breath awareness, to relax and sometimes to meditate. Scientific evidence does not support it as an effective treatment for cancer but it can improve quality of life.

There are certain medical contraindications, so a patient should always discuss its use with their oncologist.

Visit the British Wheel of Yoga website

Finding a therapist
If you would like to explore the use of complementary therapies for your child it is strongly advised that you first have a discussion with their cancer specialist – and keep the specialist informed of any therapies you may subsequently use. 

Some therapies may be provided by the hospital. The links highlighted above will provide more background information on the more commonly used complementary therapies as well as information on how to find appropriately trained therapists. 

Research
There is limited research into the benefits of complementary therapies in children, adolescents and young adults with cancer for a number of reasons. It is difficult to measure outcomes and the studies that have been done reveal that use is often concealed from the medical team. 

Hopefully future research will provide evidence based data to support the use of complementary therapies in the future.

A 2005 review by a team in the United States looked at studies performed over the preceding decade. These studies found that complementary therapies are commonly used among children diagnosed with cancer. The reasons given include: 

Wanting to do whatever they could to contribute to their child’s healthHelp with symptom managementHopes of improving the immune systemHopes of improving the chance of a cure


The majority were not using complementary therapies due to any dissatisfaction with conventional treatment. An important, recurring finding was that doctors were often unaware of the children’s use of such therapies. Various reasons were given such as “it was not important for the doctor to know”, “the doctor would not understand”, and they “didn’t want to offend the doctor”. 

The use of these therapies should always be disclosed so that safety issues can be addressed. The doctor should also be able to provide evidence-based information on potentially helpful therapies that may be safely incorporated into the child’s care plan.

Further information
The following organisations can provide further information about complementary therapies:

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council: www.cnhc.org.ukThe British Complementary Medicine Association: www.bcma.co.ukThe Federation of Holistic Therapists: www.fht.org.ukThe Institute of Complementary and Natural Medicine: http://icnm.org.uk
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Shaftesbury Acupuncture Clinic, Bedford - Google+

Shaftesbury Acupuncture Clinic, Bedford - Google+ | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it
Shaftesbury Acupuncture Clinic - Shaftesbury Clinic was established in Bedford in 2008. This popular clinic has developed a reputation for professionalism and integrity, and prides itself on providing high quality acupuncture

 

We are always happy to talk about acupuncture, and to direct you to news, research and information on acupuncture to help you decide whether acupuncture is for you.


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'He's a lot calmer but still a menace': Mother's verdict after tearaway son, 14, is given free ACUPUNCTURE

'He's a lot calmer but still a menace': Mother's verdict after tearaway son, 14, is given free ACUPUNCTURE | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

A 'one-boy wave of terror' who has stolen cars, committed arson and terrorised residents is being given free acupuncture in a bid to stop his behaviour.

Sonny Grainger, 14, is notorious in his Hull, East Yorkshire, neighbourhood for smashing windows, attacking passsers-by with sticks, stones and bottles and was just 12 when he was given an Asbo.

 

He has already been expelled from three schools.

Now the Hull Youth Justice Service has agreed to pay for a course of 45-minute acupuncture sessions costing around £40 each to try to calm him down.

  +2

Sonny Grainger with his mother Nadine West. She says the acupuncture is showing signs of working, but admits he remains a menace to neighbours and passers-by - and has urged police to be tougher on her son

 

 +2

Hull Youth Justice Service has agreed to pay for a course of 45-minute acupuncture sessions costing around £40 each to try to calm him down

His mother, Nadine West, 40, says the holistic approach is showing signs of working, but admits he remains a menace to neighbours and passers-by - and has urged police to be tougher on her son.

She said: 'Sonny loves the acupuncture. He is definitely a lot calmer when he walks out after the sessions, but he is still a menace.

 

'His school agreed to only have him for three days a week but that was not good enough for Sonny.

'He only needs to attend school on a Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. They have been absolutely fantastic. But he won't go to school now. He has not been since February.

'He spends his days hanging out with his friends or playing his computer. I am really worried I will end up getting prosecuted, but he just won't go to school. What more can I do?'

Last November, Sonny breached his Asbo when he was caught with cannabis on the school premises and assaulted another pupil.

His mother believes her family is not being given adequate help and accuses the authorities of biding their time before they throw her son in jail.

SO JUST WHAT IS 'ODD'?

Oppositional Defiant Disorder is a recognised psychiatric condition said to affect between one and 16 per cent of school-age children.

They are consistently surly, with a pattern of unco-operative, defiant and hostile behaviour towards authority figures.

Symptoms can include frequent tantrums, excessive arguing with adults, refusal to comply with requests, deliberate attempts to annoy and blame others, frequent anger or resentment, spiteful attitude and revenge seeking.

Causes are unknown, but experts believe biological, psychological and social factors might have a role.

Typical treatments include psychotherapy, anger management and social skills training. Medication can also be used.

She said: 'Giving him another Asbo when this runs out is not the answer. I honestly believe now it is only a matter of time before he is locked up and they will just throw away the key. Sonny has to learn to meet people halfway, but he is just not interested.

'I would love it if the police could make him attend some kind of boot camp. He might stand a chance.'

Nadine previously claimed Sonny's misbehaviour was down to him suffering from a Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), meaning he does the opposite of what he is told.

He has visited a child psychologist and took tablets in a bid to sedate him in the evenings with little success.

His crime sheet includes stealing cars and motorbikes, starting fires on his estate and even smashing the windows in his own home when his mother tried to tell him off.

After he was handed the Asbo in July 2009, PC Trevor Needham, the neighbourhood beat officer, said: 'Sonny Grainger has caused untold misery for the people of the estate. He has been a tyrant to people here.

'On a daily basis we received complaints about his behaviour, it is actually unbelievable just how bad this lad was.

'He has been a one-boy wave of terror and the way he was going about driving cars and setting fires, I honestly believed it was only a matter of time before he would have killed someone.

'The boy does know the difference between right and wrong and this Asbo is a last ditch attempt to change his behaviour.'



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1383016/Teenage-tyrant-given-ACUPUNCTURE-cure-tearaway-tendencies-mum-says-send-boot-camp.html#ixzz2uYlwaYQU ;
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Acupuncture and Nocturnal Eneuresis (Bedwetting) research papers

Acupuncture and Nocturnal Eneuresis (Bedwetting) research papers | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

MEDICATION FOR NOCTURAL ENURESIS

Capozza, N., Creti, G., De Gennaro, M., Minni, B., and Caione, P.; The treatment of nocturnal enuresis. A comparative study between desmopressin and acupuncture used alone or in combination. [Italian]. Minerva Pediatr 1991. Vol.43[9], p.577-582. Servizio di Urologia Pediatrica, Ospedale del Bambino Gesu, Roma 5105 During the period from March to September 1989, 40 children suffering from primary nocturnal enuresis, aged between 5 and 14 years, were included in a study to assess the comparative therapeutical efficacy of DDAVP and acupuncture. Children were divided into four groups of 10: group A was treated with DDAVP, group B was treated with acupuncture, group C was treated with DDAVP and acupuncture and group D was treated with placebo (control). The trial design included 3 periods: observation (2 weeks), treatment (8 weeks) and follow-up (4 weeks). Nineteen children completed the study. The efficacy of treatment, which was expressed as a percentage of dry nights, was high in both the DDAVP and acupuncture groups, when used separately. The combined treatment of DDAVP and acupuncture appeared to be the most efficacious both in terms of the percentage of dry nights at the end of treatment and in relation to the stability of results, even after the end of the study. The paper gives a detailed analysis of correlations between type of treatment and urinary osmolarity. Controlled clinical trial.

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The science of acupressure: references and resources

The science of acupressure: references and resources | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

BASIC SCIENCE ACUPRESSURE ARTICLES

Dullenkopf, A., Schmitz, A., Lamesic, G., Weiss, M., and Lang, A.; The influence of acupressure on the monitoring of acoustic evoked potentials in unsedated adult volunteers. Anesth.Analg. 2004. Vol.99[4], p.1147-1151. 

Rose, J. B. and Watcha, M. F.; Postoperative nausea and vomiting in paediatric patients. Br J Anaesth. 1999. Vol.83[1], p.104-117. 

White, P. F.; Are nonpharmacologic techniques useful alternatives to antiemetic drugs for the prevention of nausea and vomiting? [editorial; comment]. Anesth.Analg. 1997. Vol.84[4], p.712-714. 


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Shaftesbury Clinic's curator insight, February 14, 2014 5:16 AM

Acupressure is acupuncture without the needles, this is particularly suitable for children, and the needle-phobic, as illustrated above.

 

We offer acupressure and we also treat children of all ages at Shaftesbury Clinic, Bedford.

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German Study Finds Acupuncture Can Help Treat Allergies

With allergy season around the corner, new research looks at whether acupuncture may help treat some of the miserable symptoms.

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Shaftesbury Clinic's curator insight, February 27, 2014 2:40 PM

With #allergy season around the corner, new research looks at whether #acupuncture may help treat some of the miserable symptoms. #hayfever #research #rhinitis

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Treatment of skin diseases with acupuncture a review, Journal of Dermatological Treatment, Informa Healthcare

Treatment of skin diseases with acupuncture a review, Journal of Dermatological Treatment, Informa Healthcare | Paediatric acupuncture - acupuncture and acupressure for children | Scoop.it

Journal of Dermatological Treatment

Original Article

Treatment of skin diseases with acupuncture a review

 

1995, Vol. 6, No. 4 , Pages 241-242PDF (219 KB)PDF Plus (109 KB)ReprintsPermissionsP Rosted†200 Abbey Lane, Sheffield, S8 0BU, UK†Correspondence: P Rosted, 200 Abbey Lane, Sheffield, S8 OBU, UK

 

 

This review summarizes and criticizes 10 papers concerning the treatment of skin diseases with acupuncture. Despite a high success rate, the results are questioned because of the lack of objective evidence presented.

KeywordsSkin diseases, Acupuncture, Transepidermal nerve stimulation


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