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Asian Slaves in Colonial Mexico From Chinos to Indians | Latin American history | Cambridge University Press

Asian Slaves in Colonial Mexico From Chinos to Indians | Latin American history | Cambridge University Press | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
This book is a history of Asian slaves in colonial Mexico and their journey from bondage to freedom.
Kristie Flannery's insight:
"During the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, countless slaves from culturally diverse communities in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia journeyed to Mexico on the ships of the Manila Galleon. Upon arrival in Mexico, they were grouped together and categorized as chinos. Their experience illustrates the interconnectedness of Spain’s colonies and the reach of the crown, which brought people together from Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe in a historically unprecedented way. In time, chinos in Mexico came to be treated under the law as Indians, becoming indigenous vassals of the Spanish crown after 1672. The implications of this legal change were enormous: as Indians, rather than chinos, they could no longer be held as slaves. Tatiana Seijas tracks chinos’ complex journey from the slave market in Manila to the streets of Mexico City, and from bondage to liberty. In doing so, she challenges commonly held assumptions about the uniformity of the slave experience in the Americas
This is the first book-length project that traces chinos' origins in Asia and to offer a comprehensive reconstruction of their lives in Mexico.
It will be of interest to Mexicanists, colonial Latin Americanists,  and students/scholars of slavery in the Americas and early modern world. Seijas' study is also relevant to those studying European expansion in the Pacific.
Seijas also challenges assumptions about the uniformity of slave experience in the Americas.
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'Kangaroo' sketch suggests Portuguese may have beaten Dutch to Australia

'Kangaroo' sketch suggests Portuguese may have beaten Dutch to Australia | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Nun's 500-year-old prayer book contains sketches of a kangaroo-like creature and a man who could be an Indigenous Australian
Kristie Flannery's insight:

Did the Portuguese beat the Dutch to Australia? This is the conclusion that many have drawn after a drawing of a kangaroo, an animal native to Australia, was discovered in a 500-year old prayer book that belonged to a Portuguese woman named Caterina de Carvalho. 


It's entirely possible that the answer to this question is 'yes'; the  secrecy that surrounded early-modern Portugese navigation may have preserved the secret of discovery for centuries. But we shouldn't jump to conclusions. 


The National Library of Australia’s curator of maps, Martin Woods, said "the likeness of the animal to a kangaroo or wallaby is clear enough, but then it could be another animal in south-east Asia, like any number of deer species, some of which stand on their hind legs to feed off high branches".

 

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Mapping our World

Mapping our World | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it

The National Library of Australia (NLA) Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia exhibit provides a never-before-seen glimpse into the world’s cartographic history. Access behind-the-scenes information and view the history of the extraordinary pieces on display by selecting an application below.


Via Maree Whiteley
Kristie Flannery's insight:

Excited about this amazing exhibit on global cartography now showing at the National Library of Australia.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:25 AM

Incredible collection of historical maps...just keep clicking to enlarge the images!

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BibliOdyssey: Dapper Days in China

BibliOdyssey: Dapper Days in China | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Eclectic historic science and art images from rare books and prints
Kristie Flannery's insight:

The BibliOdyssey Blog posted these beautiful engravings from Amsterdam clergyman and doctor Olfert Dapper's late 17th century text  'Description of China'.  

 

"The illustrations for Dapper's ere undoubtedly produced by Jacob Van Meurs, a fellow countryman with his own celebrated reputation as cartographic engraver, who collaborated with Dapper on a number of projects. The visual recording of the country runs the gamut from what is likely faithful renderings of idols and religious and civil buildings from Taiwan and the Mainland, to mystical approximations or downright absurdities and fanciful botanical and biological specimens."

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Tres esclavos, los primeros japoneses de la Nueva España

Tres esclavos, los primeros japoneses de la Nueva España | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Grabado de diplomáticos japoneses en la embajada Tensho, en el siglo XVI Tres nombres yacen enterrados entre miles de documentos sobre la época colonial en el Archivo General de México: Gaspar, Miguel y Ventura.
Kristie Flannery's insight:

This blog post from the Spanish newspaper El Pais discusses evidence discovered in Mexico's Archivo General de la Nación that reveals three Japanese slaves named "Gaspar, Miguel y Ventura", were among those who traveled to New Spain in the late 16th century - they arriving in 1597.

 

What do we know abotu these enslaved men apart from their names?The two historians working on this project, Lucio de Sousa from the University of Evora (Portugal) and Mihoko Oka from the University of Tokyo have discovered some interesting details about the lives of the Japanese slaves.

 

All three were the property of a Portuguese merchant named Pérez. Gaspar was born in Bungo, in the south of the Japanese archipelago, and was sold into slavery for seven pesos when he was an eight year old boy. The only known detail about Miguel was that he was sold in 1594. 

 

The slaves accompanied Pérez from Manila, the capital of the Spanish Empire in the Philippines to Mexico City where the mercant was forced to appear before the Inquisition on suspicion of beign a Jew. Gaspar y Ventura testified about their owner's religon before the Inquistors.

 

This is an amazing find that reminds us of the wealth of Inquisition records and all their secrets that we are yet uncover.

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Cockatoo perched in Renaissance painting prompts historians to rethink Pacific and Global history

Cockatoo perched in Renaissance painting prompts historians to rethink Pacific and Global history | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Historian says the birds can live for 60 years and could have lasted the lengthy journey to Europe along the Silk Road
Kristie Flannery's insight:

Andrea Mantegna's 1496 painting (now on display at  the Louvre), clearly shows what appears to be a sulphur-crested cockatoo perched above Mary, mother of Jesus. 

 

"The cockatoo could have been transported from Australia or eastern Indonesia via China, altering what was previously known of trading routes to Europe.

 

“We know sea cucumbers were traded from the 17th century from Arnhem land but not the area where these cockatoos were,” said Dalton. “The Ming dynasty in China in the 1430s curtailed trade, which forced traders marooned in Indonesia to look to trade into India and the Middle East, which could then go onto Venice.

 

“This could explain why the cockatoo got to Venice. Whether it’s from Australia or Timor, it still challenges everything we know. I think lots of people will be looking at these paintings more closely now.”

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Guiuan church, a National Cultural Treasure in Samar, heavily damaged by ‘Yolanda’

Guiuan church, a National Cultural Treasure in Samar, heavily damaged by ‘Yolanda’ | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Typhoon “Yolanda” made first landfall at the town of Guiuan, Eastern Samar, devastating the town’s church of La Purisima Concepción, considered one of the finest and most beautiful Spanish colonial structures in the country.
Kristie Flannery's insight:

The Philippine Daily Inquirer reports on damage caused to heritage buildings in Guiuan, Eastern Samar by the recent Typhoon Yolanda, and early restoration efforts.

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When Disaster Strikes | Not Even Past

When Disaster Strikes | Not Even Past | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Kristie Flannery's insight:

What should historians do when diaster strikes? How should scholars react to the the extreme devastation wroght by Tyhoon Haiyan (or Yolanda)? See my op ed on historians' responsibilities to the communities they study on UT Austin's Not Even Past blog. 

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Imperial & Global Forum

Imperial & Global Forum | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Blog of the Centre for Imperial and Global History at the University of Exeter
Kristie Flannery's insight:

I'm excited about the new blog (and facebook page) from the Centre for Imperial and Global History at the University of Exeter; home to one of the largest groups of imperial and global historians in the UK!  Like their facebook page and stay tuned!

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Viaje de Hasekura : El Blog de la BNE

Viaje de Hasekura : El Blog de la BNE | Pacific and Global History | Scoop.it
Kristie Flannery's insight:

Today the Biblioteca Nacional de España (The National Library of Spain) has blogged about the Japanese samurai Hasekura Tsunenaga (also known as Felipe Francisco Faxecura), who traveled to Spain is an ambassador of Sendai n the early 17th Century. Several primary sources are posted, including this marvellous image of Hasekura dressed in ceremonial garb.

 

Hasekura left Japan in 1613 aboard the Datemaru, or San Juan Bautista, and arrived in Acapulco in 1614 (surely calling at Manila en route). After making the arduous journey overland across Mexico to Veracruz, the Japanaese ambassador sailed across the Atlantic to Spain.

 

Hasekura met the King of Spain, Felipe III, in Madrid in January 1615 where the two men discussed trade. The Japanese ambassador met with the Pope later that year. Clearly these powerful Europeans valued relationships with Japan. However, the Spanish monarch ultimately refused to sign a trade agreement with the Japanese ambassador because he represented a daimio, or local nobleman, and not the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu.

 

The Japanese embassy left Seville in 1617, with the exception of four members of the mission who remained in Coria del Río. One enduring impact of the trade mission: today there are 700 people in the region with the sirname "Japón".

 

An edict against christianity was progulmated after the embassy returned to Sendai. Christians were ordered to renounce their faith or be exiled (if they were part of the nobility) or executed (if they belonged to the lower orders). 

 

Hasekura died of natural causes in 1622.

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