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For Mom

For Mom | Writing | Scoop.it

amother, mom, eulogy for mom

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A beautiful tribute to a mom.

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Fun With Article Topic Generators

Fun With Article Topic Generators | Writing | Scoop.it
freelance writing tips, topic generators, blog topic generator, ideas for writers
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Fun for writers!

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6 Quick Tricks to Help You Tighten Up Your Writing | Positive Writer

6 Quick Tricks to Help You Tighten Up Your Writing | Positive Writer | Writing | Scoop.it
You can tighten up your writing without losing your voice or compromising your writing style.

Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, February 5, 2014 8:37 PM

 

The more you write, proofread and edit, the more adept you become at spotting bulging and unnecessary word fat. Six quick tricks is a fast read to help you do just that. Which one of the six do you need to work on?

 

My favorite was #3, simply because I love the word "circumlocution." Has quite a ring to it. It means: don't be too wordy. Don't use two words when one will do. Three instead of four. Pick the best adjective out of two.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://positivewriter.com/tighten-your-writing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+PositiveWriter+%28Positive+Writer%29

 

Paige durand's curator insight, February 5, 2014 8:42 PM

This is a really useful article since it gives 6 ways to clean up your writing. I like how it almost forces you to do everything you've been doing wrong and through it away. Like myself i have a problem of using words repetitively and my work sometimes sounds out of order. this article tells you how to fix that in the simplest of ways.

Penelope's comment, February 5, 2014 8:43 PM
I agree!
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To Write or To Play? That Used to be the Question - Angie's Diary

To Write or To Play? That Used to be the Question - Angie's Diary | Writing | Scoop.it
To Write or To Play? – That used to be the question – Now you can do both at the same time. Introducing a brand new way of competitive writing.
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Soothe Your Soul From Grief

Soothe Your Soul From Grief | Writing | Scoop.it
Grief, child loss, bereaved parents, death of a child,
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A beautifully written book written by a mother who lost her daughter to cancer. Farrimond not only tells her story but helps others survive the grief journey.

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Helping you become a #1 Bestselling Author

Helping you become a #1 Bestselling Author | Writing | Scoop.it

Bestselling Author … Bestselling Novel … sounds good doesn’t it?


Via Jane Steen, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Poetry Quiz | Box Clever | QuizFortune

Poetry Quiz | Box Clever | QuizFortune | Writing | Scoop.it
From Wilde to Whitman, Yeats to Keats, how well do you know your poetry? Find out in QuizFortune's Poets and Poems Quiz
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Hummm....

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Book Review of: Soothe Your Soul From Grief; A Mother's Inspiration

Book Review of: Soothe Your Soul From Grief; A Mother's Inspiration | Writing | Scoop.it
Grief, child loss, bereaved parents, death of a child,death of a loved one, emerging from grief
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A review of Erica Farrimond's Soothe Your Soul From Grief

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We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up

We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up | Writing | Scoop.it
All too often it's English teachers who close down teen interest in reading.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Lynnette Van Dyke
Shay Davidson's insight:

Interesting. I'm quite sure people could argue all day about the books kids are forced to read in high school. I only wish that good teachers had a choice in the books they wanted to present to students--and I'd get to pick the good teachers out!

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:36 PM

24 January 2014

 (This scooped article was orignally published in 2008)

 

Okay, Gulp!

 

I think I'll begin my comments with one of my favorite Dick Cavett quotes....

 

__________

It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear.

__________

 

There, I said it. Literature teachers, we may just be a big part of the problem, well intended as we may be.

 

If you don't read the scooped article, or finish my brief comments, I'll include one paragragh from the article worthy of some open-minded collegial contemplation in a pending department meeting...

 

__________

""Butchering." That's what one of my former students, a young man who loves creative writing but rarely gets to do any at school, called English class. He was referring to the endless picking apart of linguistic details that loses teens in a haze of "So what?" The reading quizzes that turn, say, "Hamlet" into a Q&A on facts, symbols and themes. The thesis-driven essay assignments that require students to write about a novel they can't muster any passion for ("The Scarlet Letter" is high on teens' list of most dreaded). I'll never forget what one parent, bemoaning his daughter's aversion to great books after she took AP English Literature, wrote to me: "What I've seen teachers do is take living, breathing works of art and transform them into dessicated lab specimens fit for dissection."

__________

 

(awkward pause)

 

 

 

Yes, we do need to sow the seeds of the next crop of English majors. But, we ought to consider it even more important, since the numbers are so lopsided, to remember that as many as 90% of our students "ain't gonna major in English" and perhaps as many as 50% of our students "ain't gonna read a single piece of fiction" after they are no longer required to do so.

 

I know.

 

I don't particularly want to hear it either.  But "facts is facts." And, if there is any truth in the contentions made in this article that in too many cases we may be killing what we believe we are nourishing we may want to revisit even our own personal favorite lessons.

 

I am not proposing that we "dumb down" but rather that we give some thought to how we might "relevance up" what we do in our literary reading instruction. Anyone who can't imagine how to "relevance up" say a play like Cyrano deBergerac, must surely have forgotten what it felt like to have acne or the intensity of the forces of physical attractivenss at a time in one's life when "inner beauty" is just something that teens' parents say is really important while correcting their children's posture.

 

Yes, of course! That's it. Our students don't particularly want to hear what they don't want to hear either. But, we're the grown ups in the room aren't we? 

 

Of course if taken as a blanket condemnation of how we teach literary reading, then it is a harsh and unfair implication to suggest that none of us do manage to successfully engage the vast majority of our students. But, if we are willing to listen and hear what we may not really want to hear, we may give some readjusted attention to the complaints of those who are brave or annoyed enough to express those complaints. And, if we really do want to hear what we really don't want to hear, then we might also spend significant time listening to the eerie silience of those who "lay low" only pretending to care or to those silent ones who don't even bother to pretend to care while wondering why the clock moves so slowly.

 

We can sometimes too easily explain away the complaints and disengaged silence by believing that "they're just lazy, they spend too much time on facebook, they just don't care, that they just want less challenging work." There certainly are those. But a surprising number of the disengaged don't want less; they want "something" more.

 

It was not too long ago that the battle cry was, "No Child Left Behind!" But, I would propose that perhaps an equally important concern is that when we finish with them, that they do not ride off "into the real world" happy to be finally free to leave some of their teachers behind.

 

Teach to their hearts and their minds will follow.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

Steffen Sipe's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:45 AM

sorry....

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While the Jester Laughs

While the Jester Laughs | Writing | Scoop.it
poem, political poem,
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Beautifully written poem about our lack of control...

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The Cithian Chronicles : My first book

The Cithian Chronicles : My first book | Writing | Scoop.it
Another Cithian rose into the air. Beams of Darkness hit straight into five buildings. We all screamed and ran into the sewers. I saw a door about a foot or two away. It had cobwebs all over it. The pitter patter of footsteps came ...
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